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Dremel users: any reason to upgrade to the 3000 or 4000 series from older Dremel?

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 03-24-2018 02:11 AM 5590 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

2213 posts in 2448 days


03-24-2018 02:11 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dremel

I have a corded Dremel 395 that has the main duty of removing rust and polishing upon refurbishing duties upon planes & saws. I “suffices” for it’s job at hand. But I see the newest Dremel with more fanicer features. Anyone with the newer generation of Dremel possible to convince me to upgrade? The cordless/battery versions have no home in my shop :) I prefer corded.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"


11 replies so far

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therealSteveN

3095 posts in 993 days


#1 posted 03-24-2018 03:57 AM

I’m with you. I’ve had a Dremel model since I was 7, so 56 years ago I got my first one. Through the years I’ve burnt through a few, but basically just keep getting the basic tool. I’ve grown to love them for being able to put a cutting wheel, sanding, or burring tips on the tool, and bring the tool to the work.

Looking at the newer ones I see adjustable speed, like with routers. Everybody has to have nothing but an adjustable speed router, yet very few people ever change the speed from HIGH. I have plenty of permanently based equipment to bring the work to, so I don’t need a tiny Dremel to bring work to while it sits in some flimsy stand. Nah, it’s a tool you put a tip in to do what you want done, and bring the tool to the work, small work, finish work.

-- Think safe, be safe

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#2 posted 03-24-2018 04:33 AM

I have three Dremels and a couple of no-name brands. I got a 4000 as a present about a year ago and love it. For comparison, I have a way old “Moto-Tool” (model 370), as well as a newer model 395, all of which are variable speed and corded. The main advantage to the 4000 is the speed control, which (theoretically) maintains a constant speed regardless of load. It will bog slightly, but it’s a 1000% better than the others, which I can basically bring to a dead stop if I get too aggressive with them.

BTW: I got the 370 for free back after Hurricane Andrew – it had got wet and all rusted up, so my FIL was throwing it away. I took it apart and cleaned/lubed it up, and have been using it ever since. Unfortunately, you can’t replace the bearings on those, so I just have to keep them greased manually every now and then. It does get rather hot after a few minutes of continued use, so it’s generally set up for drilling only. My 395 was a CL purchase for $20… I already had the 4000, but wanted a Dremel flex-shaft which the 395 came with (along with a bunch of other stuff). Basically new, it was cheaper than buying the flex-shaft in the store, and an extra Dremel came along with it! If you don’t already have a flex shaft – get one – it will change the way you think about your Dremel :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2448 days


#3 posted 03-24-2018 01:29 PM

Brad… what do you use the flex shaft for? Again, my Dremel currently is only used to work on rust parts. Maybe I should expand my use knowledge of this little tool!

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2414 days


#4 posted 03-24-2018 01:55 PM

If you do decide to upgrade, get a variable speed one. Some of the tools work better at lower speeds, especially if you are trying to prevent something from getting too hot, or using the felt polishing pads. I would say it is not like the router example above…variable speed can be really handy on a dremel.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2448 days


#5 posted 03-24-2018 04:13 PM

Yep Brian and Brad…your suggestions are wise :) I’ll go snag a 4300 with flex shaft today after seeing a bunch of videos and reviews.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#6 posted 03-25-2018 05:12 AM

Yep Brian and Brad…your suggestions are wise :) I ll go snag a 4300 with flex shaft today after seeing a bunch of videos and reviews.
- Holbs

The 4300 is the newest on the block, and apparently is slightly bigger, has an LED light and uses a three jaw chuck system instead of the standard collet setup… I’d be interested in hearing how you like it. I guess it wouldn’t matter much if you keep the flex-shaft on it though. (here is a comparison writeup of the various 4xxx models).

As for the benefits of the flex-shaft – it lets you use and hold the tool like a pen, allowing you to get places where it’s either impossible or awkward to get to with the tool itself. It is also significantly lighter than using the tool directly, so you can use it for longer without any fatigue. I was using it tonight to shape some small 3” airplane propellers (making a baby mobile for the daughter who is expecting), and it would have been a PITA without the shaft IMO. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View mel52's profile

mel52

865 posts in 683 days


#7 posted 03-28-2018 02:34 AM

The 4000 tool has a lot more attachments that are fitted to it better. The cutting end is a little different shaped and sized for the attachments from what I’ve noticed. I have different attachments and the flex shaft that fits it and not the older models I have.

-- MEL, Kansas

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2213 posts in 2448 days


#8 posted 03-28-2018 02:54 AM

Yep Mel…I pulled the trigger and bought the latest & greatest version of dremel 4300 with flex shaft. I have much plane and other tool refurbishing to do and the LED end cap light and flex shaft will serve wonderfully. Also, my older 395 must of been dropped a number of times because it actually smoked a little last time I used it. Hence, the consideration of purchasing a new model. I can already tell the 1.8amp motor difference between the 4300 and 395 too.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2448 days


#9 posted 04-04-2018 03:30 AM

Thanks Brad :) I did buy the flexible shaft and it came in handy cleaning up my miter box. Lightweight, can get into tight spots. Well worth the $$$.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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DIY_Guy

3 posts in 562 days


#10 posted 07-04-2018 10:50 PM

There is a nice comparison below. Looks like the 4000 has a self-adjusting mechanism of the rotary tool. With the Dremel 4000, you don’t have to stop working and adjust its settings; the tool will do that automatically.

https://perfectcutsandmiters.com/general/dremel-3000-vs-4000/

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

245 posts in 499 days


#11 posted 08-26-2018 11:48 PM

Old thread, but I replaced my worn-out Dremel with the Makita M12 one, and I’m happy with it. It has a lot of torque.

The only reason I chose it over the Dremel version is that the Makita comes with cut-off attachments rather than more sanding things I already have.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-M12-12-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Rotary-Tool-Kit-w-1-1-5Ah-Battery-Charger-Tool-Bag-2460-21/202639145?cm_mmc=hd_email-_-Confirmation_STH_BOSS-_-20180623_PP_ET_Merch_Confirmation_STH_BOSS_3136866-_-product_desc__W833653219

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