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Temporary Dust Collection/Electrical Needs

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Forum topic by Nevaskwehr posted 03-23-2018 05:07 PM 509 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nevaskwehr

14 posts in 488 days


03-23-2018 05:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collection wood chips filter

Hey Jocks,

I’m currently using my parents’ garage to run my tools until I move in the fall and get a dedicated workspace (REALLY excited, can’t wait to post). I am dying in the dust even with a tight-fitting mask and the garage door open, so I’m looking into getting air filtration and possibly a small Wall-mountable dust collector to hook up to my planer. I’m using a Ryobi TS right now until I move and can get 220v. Currently, my only option is the single 20A 110v circuit running to the garage. Can I run my tools, small dust collector, and small Rikon 400cfm air filter on the circuit, or is it a pipe dream and I’ll have to wait until I move to breath? I can’t change the electrical wiring whatsoever.

Thanks,
Jordan

-- If I knew what I was doing, I’d be rich by now


13 replies so far

View Crashcup's profile

Crashcup

53 posts in 1619 days


#1 posted 03-23-2018 05:22 PM

If it were me, and I was in LA, I’d probably just get a big fan to put in a window. Between that and the open garage door, I would think that would move the dust out. Does the garage have a window on an opposite or adjacent wall from the door?

Or, do you mobile bases on your machines so you can wheel them into the driveway to work?

I’m assuming from your post that the TS and planer are working okay on the existing electrical….

View Nevaskwehr's profile

Nevaskwehr

14 posts in 488 days


#2 posted 03-23-2018 07:15 PM

Hi, thanks for the reply. It doesn’t have an accessible window, but there is a side door I could put a fan in. The driveway is a 30-35 degree slant, so it’s out of the picture. The tools work on the existing electrical, but I haven’t had to use two big power consumers at he same time.

-- If I knew what I was doing, I’d be rich by now

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4067 days


#3 posted 03-23-2018 07:26 PM

Have you tried a shop vac to get the dust?

Those little cyclone things and dust separator
lids work pretty well for collecting planer chips.
I used to use a separator lid with a 2.25” shop
vac hose on the outlet and a 4” dust hose on
the inlet.

I’m pessimistic about running a dust collector
and a 15 amp table saw on one 20 amp breaker.

A square fan with a furnace filter taped to it may
help with the airborne fine dust.

View Steve's profile

Steve

1356 posts in 1001 days


#4 posted 03-23-2018 07:47 PM

You could make a fan door to roll in front of the door.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-how-to/shop-tips/fan-door-clears-shop-air

View Nevaskwehr's profile

Nevaskwehr

14 posts in 488 days


#5 posted 03-23-2018 07:57 PM



Have you tried a shop vac to get the dust?

Those little cyclone things and dust separator
lids work pretty well for collecting planer chips.
I used to use a separator lid with a 2.25” shop
vac hose on the outlet and a 4” dust hose on
the inlet.

I m pessimistic about running a dust collector
and a 15 amp table saw on one 20 amp breaker.

A square fan with a furnace filter taped to it may
help with the airborne fine dust.

- Loren

So, I have the planer on a cart with a trash can under it to collect the chips as a separator, but I wanted to collect the fine dust coming through the screen I built in. I’ll try using my shop vac, just didn’t think the cfms were high enough for the output of the planer fan.

I like the idea of attaching a furnace filter to the back of a fan.


You could make a fan door to roll in front of the door.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-how-to/shop-tips/fan-door-clears-shop-air

- bndawgs

Great idea! I wish I had enough space on either side of the door.

-- If I knew what I was doing, I’d be rich by now

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1159 posts in 1980 days


#6 posted 03-23-2018 07:59 PM

Just plug in what you want to run and flip the switches. If the breaker doesn’t trip at any time you’re good to go.

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

434 posts in 2339 days


#7 posted 03-24-2018 12:12 AM



Hey Jocks,

I’m currently using my parents’ garage to run my tools until I move in the fall and get a dedicated workspace (REALLY excited, can’t wait to post). I am dying in the dust even with a tight-fitting mask and the garage door open, so I’m looking into getting air filtration and possibly a small Wall-mountable dust collector to hook up to my planer. I’m using a Ryobi TS right now until I move and can get 220v. Currently, my only option is the single 20A 110v circuit running to the garage. Can I run my tools, small dust collector, and small Rikon 400cfm air filter on the circuit, or is it a pipe dream and I’ll have to wait until I move to breath? I can’t change the electrical wiring whatsoever.

Thanks,
Jordan

- Nevaskwehr

You have 20 amps, what are the amp draw of what you want to run combined and not going over ~ 16 / 18 amps; you need the rest to start the motors.

View Nevaskwehr's profile

Nevaskwehr

14 posts in 488 days


#8 posted 03-24-2018 01:31 AM

Table saw: 15A
Shop vac: 11A
Air filter: 1A

I’ve run the shop vac with my miter saw, which is also 15A. So, this doesn’t really make sense to me.

-- If I knew what I was doing, I’d be rich by now

View Nevaskwehr's profile

Nevaskwehr

14 posts in 488 days


#9 posted 03-24-2018 01:47 AM

My mom just told me she could barely breathe in there even though I haven’t been in there since yesterday. Is a large fan in the door really going to have the same effect as having a Rikon, or Jet, air filtration unit?

-- If I knew what I was doing, I’d be rich by now

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4067 days


#10 posted 03-24-2018 02:36 AM

If you have an unheated shop or don’t need
to recirculate the air, blowing the dust outside
is more effective than cleaning it inside. You
may burn out your shop vac if you leave it
running with a hose in the shop and the outlet
outside, but it will help clear the air.

Getting the dust at the source is the best approach
by far. The table saw is a big offender with
fine dust because the blade sprays it all over.
Planers produce mostly chips. I’m a convert to
using a hose on the blade guard of a table
saw. It stops a lot of debris from hitting me
(which ruins clothing if I don’t wear an apron)
and also stops a lot of airborne dust. The heavier
chips fall to the floor easily enough or a bag/box
can be fitted beneath the saw.

You can buy a 1hp dust collector and maybe run
it on the same circuit with the planer or saw,
but no guarantees. At the very least you can
put the hose in the shop and put the collector
outside to clear the air after you’re done for the
day.

View Nevaskwehr's profile

Nevaskwehr

14 posts in 488 days


#11 posted 03-24-2018 04:14 AM

I found this on Home Depot’s website, it has two settings, 4000cfm high and 2800cfm low. It seems like this will be way more than enough to get it out, and I might be able to attach a filter to the back while blocking out the gaps.

-- If I knew what I was doing, I’d be rich by now

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

595 posts in 2633 days


#12 posted 03-24-2018 02:43 PM

Jordan,

So I’m not going to comment on air movers, the guys above provided some examples. But before I added a some additional wiring, I had one circuit in my garage. On the wall around the corner from my garage, however, there was another outlet on the exterior wall on a different circuit.

So for a long time I just rolled out a heavy duty extension cord and ran my DC off of that circuit. So maybe you can double up your power feed simply by adding an extension cord?

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View Nevaskwehr's profile

Nevaskwehr

14 posts in 488 days


#13 posted 03-24-2018 04:58 PM

Hey Mike,

I haven’t thought of that at all, actually. That’s a great idea!

-- If I knew what I was doing, I’d be rich by now

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