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Sawing 1.5" hard maple: 14TPI backsaw not suitable?

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 02-28-2018 01:38 AM 647 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

2213 posts in 2449 days


02-28-2018 01:38 AM

Sawing with my Veritas 14TPI tenon crosscut saw on 1.5”thick hard maple is…a challenge to keep a straight line while at the same time trying to keep the angle. I was thinking today… when gathering info on handsaws, I read somewhere it is ideal to have a maximum of 7 teeth in your material. Well, I’m using…21 teeth into 1.5” hard maple. Now I wonder if it would be more…suitable to use a 8-10 TPI backsaw for these dovetail sawing. Granted, I realize it would be a rougher cut at the expense of more control.
Does that sound more reasonable to use 8-10 TPI backsaw? I do have 5 backsaws I could take one and reconfigure & recut to test.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"


11 replies so far

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Loren

10477 posts in 4067 days


#1 posted 02-28-2018 01:54 AM

I have dovetailed with a bow saw filed for
ripping at about 10tpi. Works pretty well.

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2449 days


#2 posted 02-28-2018 01:59 AM

Ha! I’ll feel foolish if all this time, I thought dovetail cuts were to be crosscut since somewhat crossing the grain. I’ll give my veritas 14tpi rip tenon backsaw a go at the next 4 dovetails coming up. Or maybe try with 2, and then try 10 tpi rip backsaw on following two for compared.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2449 days


#3 posted 02-28-2018 02:46 AM

Thanks Loren. I think you saved me from years of frustration . Tried the 12tpi rip saw and I had more control since didn’t have to really forcefully guide it.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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Loren

10477 posts in 4067 days


#4 posted 02-28-2018 03:04 AM

I’m happy that helped.

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1905 days


#5 posted 02-28-2018 03:26 AM

Yep. Dovetails are almost always rip.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2449 days


#6 posted 02-28-2018 04:09 AM

Imagine crosscutting with 14 tpi for a couple years. Almost gave up and sought machine answers.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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JP4LSU

85 posts in 567 days


#7 posted 03-01-2018 01:03 PM

OK, I new to this. Are you guys saying that cross grain dovetails should be done with a rip saw instead of a dovetail saw. I thought a dovetail saw would be good for both with the grain and cross grain.
So if cutting a dovetail cross grain use maybe a tenon saw?
Thanks for the wisdom,
JP

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Tim

3814 posts in 2381 days


#8 posted 03-01-2018 01:48 PM

JP, dovetails aren’t really cross grain. You’re only going a slight angle away from straight with the grain. Besides a rip saw of a fine enough tpi can crosscut just fine.

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JP4LSU

85 posts in 567 days


#9 posted 03-01-2018 06:04 PM

Thanks Tim for clearing it up. Yes I stated that wrong, it is not cross grain. So really with any dovetailing you just want a fine tooth and it should be able to any dovetail cut, correct?

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Tim

3814 posts in 2381 days


#10 posted 03-01-2018 06:31 PM

Basically yes. The right saw for each different cut gives some increase in efficiency and cut quality but you don’t have to go crazy about it unless you want to.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4067 days


#11 posted 03-01-2018 06:42 PM

Larger dovetails can get tiring to cut.

Also, many saws sold as dovetail saws are
not set up very well. They have too much
set and will wander in the kerf. There are
higher end ones available today that are set
up for fine woodworking. Any old back saw
you find at an antique store or new in a harware
store is unlikely to be set nicely for dovetails.

I’ve cut smaller dovetails with a dozuki saw
with excellent results. The Japanese saws
pull dust back at you though and it’s hard to
see the marked lines. Blowing away the dust
gets tiresome. Also, the teeth break off if
you’re not careful.

There are now push-cut saws with Japanese
tooth patterns. They probably work pretty well.
A saw filed for ripping will still cut dovetails
faster I’d bet, but not by a lot.

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