LumberJocks

Moisture Meters - Do you use them?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by JDub posted 03-14-2008 08:55 PM 1078 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JDub's profile

JDub

6 posts in 4360 days


03-14-2008 08:55 PM

I’ve read a lot of articles and have considered (on and off) buying a moisture meter. I almost always work with kiln dried rough lumber from a known and trusted source. I’ve never had a problem in the past with warping, splitting or cupping in any of my finished projects, provided I’ve allowed the lumber to acclimate to my shop for a couple weeks before milling any of it.

My problem is, every time I read an article or pick up a book I begin to feel like I may be just asking for a problem down the road. Seems like most of the writers really believe it’s an essential thing to have your shop.

Before I drop a couple hundered dollars on one of these, I thought I’d ask… Do any of you use a moisture meter regularlly? If you do, do you have one you would recommend?

Thanks
Jim

-- "None of us is as dumb as all of us"


5 replies so far

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4620 days


#1 posted 03-14-2008 09:42 PM

Try this link. I asked about the same thing.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/1049

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View JDub's profile

JDub

6 posts in 4360 days


#2 posted 03-15-2008 12:44 AM

Thanks for the info Gary. Did you ever decide to get one or still sworn off?

-- "None of us is as dumb as all of us"

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4620 days


#3 posted 03-15-2008 12:57 AM

Still without.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27250 posts in 4454 days


#4 posted 03-15-2008 06:49 AM

I’ve got a Wagner pinless meter and use it but I don’t really worry about the moisture content that it displays. I buy rough kiln dried wood and some of it has been sitting in my shop for at least 2 years. I still get a 12% reading on the meter. The bottom line is that I simply have no control over the moisture content of the wood so I go ahead and use it anyway.

Not one of my wisest purchases.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1288 posts in 4369 days


#5 posted 03-15-2008 07:32 AM

I always use a moisture meter when working with solid stock. Without knowing the moisture content one risks having a problem down the road. A nice project can have problems with shrinking or swelling of the joints or veneered substrate if material with different moisture content is used. It also is important to know if the piece is to be in a dry or humid area. My stock of wood normally runs in the 6 to 8 % range. I prefer as low as possible because of where I live. Wood and manufactured wood products are a medium that is always alive. They move constantly and thus demand that the project be designed with that in mind. I have seen 3 feet of 4”x4” Maple move 3/16” lengthwise from winter to summer.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com