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Brad Nail Blowout

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Forum topic by IantheTinker posted 01-26-2018 01:55 AM 2240 views 0 times favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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IantheTinker

285 posts in 546 days


01-26-2018 01:55 AM

Topic tags/keywords: brad nail gun blowout veneer plywood trim

I was installing some trim on a dvd shelf I am working on and I had 2 brad nails go wonky on me and punch through the birch veneer on the plywood. I was careful to line my gun up properly so that the chiseled tip of the nail had plenty of room to veer off, but it still happened. How can I fix this? One of them is not so bad, but the other was quite obvious. I tried pulling the trim away, but the other nails were holding it in place too well and I was afraid of scuffing things up. Any tips are appreciated, thank you.

-- pensivewoodworker.com


40 replies so far

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1290 posts in 1328 days


#1 posted 01-26-2018 02:12 AM

The different densities in the layers of plywood can sometimes cause the nail to take a path of least resistance and veer off course. I’ve had this happen more than once. You can try a couple of things to fix your issue.

Method #1) Do not try to back the nail out of the hole. Rather, pull it through and hope it’s only a minor repair.

Method #2) Grab the end of the nail that’s sticking through the piece and bend it back and forth to break it off. Most times it will break off just below the surface of the wood and the marred surface will have a minor imperfection that can be repaired.

I’ve taken to using glue with trim moldings and 23 gauge pin nails to hold the trim in place while the glue sets. For me, a much better approach, and virtually no need to fill nail holes after the trim is installed.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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John Smith

1880 posts in 582 days


#2 posted 01-26-2018 02:16 AM

if it is a good clean protrusion, I would just cut it off flush and bury it with a nail set
of the same size and mix some wood flour the same color and fill the hole.
the more you tug and pull on it – the worse it will get.
No.1 tool choice would be flush cut end nippers.
No.2 tool choice would be the basic side cutters.

this is a good tool to have in your box if you are going to be doing much brad work.
any set of side cutters can be ground to have a flat flush cutter side and blunt nose
as long as you can put some power in it. . . . also the Dremel Tool with a cut-off wheel will work well.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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Gilley23

489 posts in 801 days


#3 posted 01-26-2018 02:32 AM

Yeah, sometimes you can’t help it. The end of the nails are chiseled so if your angle is even slightly off and they hit a tougher spot they’ll curve and shoot out somewhere else. Remove and repair.

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IantheTinker

285 posts in 546 days


#4 posted 01-26-2018 02:47 AM


I ve taken to using glue with trim moldings and 23 gauge pin nails to hold the trim in place while the glue sets. For me, a much better approach, and virtually no need to fill nail holes after the trim is installed.

- Ripper70

I recently saw a video, from Woodworkers Guild of America I think, and the fella in that also used 23 gauge pin nails. They left such tiny holes, I will have to get a pin nailer at some point so that I can switch to them as well. Thanks for the reply!

-- pensivewoodworker.com

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IantheTinker

285 posts in 546 days


#5 posted 01-26-2018 02:47 AM



if it is a good clean protrusion, I would just cut it off flush and bury it with a nail set
of the same size and mix some wood flour the same color and fill the hole.
the more you tug and pull on it – the worse it will get.
No.1 tool choice would be flush cut end nippers.
No.2 tool choice would be the basic side cutters.

- John Smith

I think I will give this a try, thank you, John.

-- pensivewoodworker.com

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

4563 posts in 1009 days


#6 posted 01-26-2018 05:20 AM

What gauge? 16, 18, 23?

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Andybb

1932 posts in 1023 days


#7 posted 01-26-2018 05:49 AM

The greatest $/usage tool value on the planet. (at least for me) Use it ALL of the time. Mine is 4 yrs old and still cuts brads like butter. Then, like somebody said, tap the end with a nail set and you’re good to go after a dab of putty or glue and sawdust. Plywood is funny like that.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Tony_S

976 posts in 3502 days


#8 posted 01-26-2018 10:40 AM

You mentioned the chiseled tip on the nails, so I assume that you are aware that you need to hold the nail gun perpendicular to the plywood(or molding) edge?
Another mistake I see quite a few people make, is using nails that are too long for the given task. The longer the nail, especially with the lighter gauge 23’s, the more prone they are to curl/veer.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

5316 posts in 2728 days


#9 posted 01-26-2018 11:03 AM

https://youtu.be/aXIH2c_1PzE

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1437 posts in 2055 days


#10 posted 01-26-2018 04:30 PM

Not only can the brad nail deviate its course and pop out of the board, it can pop right into your finger too!
This is why I keep my fingers well away from what I am shooting a brad nail into.
I agree with the previous comment about using a brad that is longer than needed.
Almost all of my blowouts have happened when I had a longer brad than I really needed but I was either too lazy to stop and change them out or I was using what I had “on-hand”.

I have used a nail set a few times to push the brad back into the wood and then repair the area with sawdust and glue. I have even used a pencil to draw the grain back onto my patch and it is surprising how well it blended in.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3542 posts in 1807 days


#11 posted 01-26-2018 05:02 PM


You mentioned the chiseled tip on the nails, so I assume that you are aware that you need to hold the nail gun perpendicular to the plywood(or molding) edge?
Another mistake I see quite a few people make, is using nails that are too long for the given task. The longer the nail, especially with the lighter gauge 23 s, the more prone they are to curl/veer.

- Tony_S

+1.
The brads can usually only bend left or right so if you orient the gun properly and don’t nail too close to the end, it is less likely to veer off course and if it does it will still be inside the plywood.

What I have done when I have forgotten this or couldn’t turn the nail gun in the proper orientation was to pull the brad all the way through where it protruded to remove the errant brad. Of course fixing the damaged veneer is another problem.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1318 days


#12 posted 01-26-2018 05:10 PM

Who has time to go find a hammer and punch to set the nub after you clip it.
I just use the set pin on the nailer, pull the nails back and fire away.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1880 posts in 582 days


#13 posted 01-26-2018 05:56 PM

jbay: “Who has time to go find a hammer and punch to set the nub after you clip it.”

I do – I have the time to do quality work.
My tools are organized and I don’t have to “go find” anything.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

4563 posts in 1009 days


#14 posted 01-26-2018 06:48 PM


jbay: “Who has time to go find a hammer and punch to set the nub after you clip it.”

I do – I have the time to do quality work.
My tools are organized and I don t have to “go find” anything.

- John Smith

I’ve seen jbay’s portfolio, John. You might do well to rethink that “quality work” crack.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

5316 posts in 2728 days


#15 posted 01-26-2018 06:52 PM

https://youtu.be/aXIH2c_1PzE

jbay: “Who has time to go find a hammer and punch to set the nub after you clip it.”

I do – I have the time to do quality work.
My tools are organized and I don t have to “go find” anything.

- John Smith

I ve seen jbay s portfolio, John. You might do well to rethink that “quality work” snip.

- Rich


Yes you have to give jaybay that, he does very nice work. You should take the time to look at he stuff.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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