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Problems with my DeWalt planer- please help!

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Forum topic by Peter5 posted 12-14-2010 10:19 PM 10791 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Peter5

66 posts in 3855 days


12-14-2010 10:19 PM

I bought a DeWalt planer second hand and it seemed to work great at first but eventually started overheating. I checked the blades and realized they were dull, so I put brand new blades on. It worked OK for a while before shutting down completely (wouldn’t start up). I noticed that the brushes were blown out, so I ordered new ones and put them in. With the new brushes it started right up, I took about 6 passes on a piece of rosewood and it died again. I pulled out the brushes and, just from those 6 passes, the brushes were completely blown out again. Am I doing something wrong? What could cause brand new brushes to blow out so quickly? Also, it was making sparks (the sparks were actually flying out as I was using it)- does that help explain anything? Lastly, is it worthwhile to take it to a DeWalt service center and have them repair it, or would it be better to just buy a new one? Thanks in advance for your advice.

-- Pete, Long Beach, CA http://www.petedeeblefurniture.com


11 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5952 posts in 4714 days


#1 posted 12-14-2010 11:01 PM

Pete—I don’t think it is you or anything you are doing wrong. Sounds like you have a bad motor.

Which model is this (DW733, DW734, or DW735)? If it is a 733, it might not be worth repairing.

Have you contacted DeWalt about the problem?

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View rance's profile

rance

4278 posts in 4212 days


#2 posted 12-14-2010 11:12 PM

Your motor armature is eating the brushes. Most likely needs to be replaced, as opposed to repaired.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Peter5's profile

Peter5

66 posts in 3855 days


#3 posted 12-15-2010 07:28 AM

Thanks guys. I’m going to look into getting a new motor armature- is that something I can replace myself?

-- Pete, Long Beach, CA http://www.petedeeblefurniture.com

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 4522 days


#4 posted 12-15-2010 07:54 AM

inspect the commutator …the multi-sectioned part the brushes ride upon.

View rance's profile

rance

4278 posts in 4212 days


#5 posted 12-20-2010 11:00 PM

Dan is right. Here’s a picture :

See the blackened ring? That’s what’s most likely eating your brushes.

If you have a lathe(yes, even a wood lathe), you could possibly mount the armature on your lathe(commutator to the left for more rigidity). Then VERY CAREFULLY, scrape away the burned part of the commutator till you are down to smooth Brass(or Copper). Then a delicate swipe with 120 grit or so(very lightly here). This may get you back in bidness.

BE WEWEY CAREFUL TO NOT BREAK THE WIRES CONNECTED TO THE COMMUTATOR ELEMENTS. Also, don’t try this if you are not proficient with turning.

As for replacing the armature yourself, if you’ve ever taken a motor apart(that has brushes) and successfully reassembled it, then you’d probably do ok.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20614 posts in 4727 days


#6 posted 12-21-2010 09:13 AM

use emery cloth, not sandpaper on electrical parts.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Peter5

66 posts in 3855 days


#7 posted 12-22-2010 08:41 AM

Thanks everyone, when things slow down in my shop I’ll try to get the commutator on my lathe and see how it goes. I really appreciate the input.

-- Pete, Long Beach, CA http://www.petedeeblefurniture.com

View GrenenstalNL's profile

GrenenstalNL

2 posts in 2014 days


#8 posted 10-07-2015 08:46 AM

Goodday,

I’m curious if Peter5 ever got round to getting the commutator from the housing. We ran into the same problem here in Holland, with a DW733 that lost a chip of the brushes. We are trying to remove the commutator from it’s housing but we can’t find a decent way to remove the pulley from the commutator’s axle. Removing the pulley is neccessary if one wants to be able to remove the commutator from the housing. The free end of the commutator is not readily suitable for applying great pressure. Nor is there any free axle space for clamping on the pulleyside.

I have been able to find out the pulley is left threaded, the parts list of dewalt mentions this.

It there anyone here who has managed to do so? And if so: what’s the trick?

EDIT: In the meantime my father has managed to remove the pulley. The pointer of the thread being LH and, despite my feelings about applying pressure to the gear on the other side of the commutator, putting the other end in the vise with the use of aluminum plates, has helped him enough to solve the problem.

View BobinWNC's profile

BobinWNC

8 posts in 2701 days


#9 posted 04-16-2020 04:35 PM

I have had problems with my DW735 (about 15 years old) for about 2 years, sporadically shutting off in the middle of planing. I’ve been able to get it running each time using the tried and true method known as “whacking”. I drilled a 3/4” hole in the machine’s yellow plastic housing directly above the motor, and when it would shut off, I’d pull the plastic plug I used to close the hole and drop a stout little maple stick in, making contact with the motor housing, and give it a good whack with a mallet. Most times it would start right up, and sometimes it would take 2 or 3 whacks. But this time no amount of whacking was getting it going. I had already replaced the brushes and verified that they were making good contact with the commutator of the armature.
I got the motor off of the machine and disassembled it. (Thanks for the tip above about the reverse threads on the belt pulley.) I put the armature on the lathe and cleaned up the commutator with emery paper. It wasn’t too bad, but now it looks like new. Tested the armature with a multi-meter: 3 different tests I found in a video online. Search for “Groschopp Tech Tips: How to check for a damaged armature”. It passed all 3 tests. Next went to remove the motor field from the case. intending to run similar tests on it. The most difficult part was releasing the plastic 90 degree power cord retainer. Tip – use an adjustable wrench to carefully rotate it 180 degrees – don’t stress the wires – and you can access the release on the bottom. It was still a bear to get it out.
When I pulled out the field, I found a broken supply wire on the bottom which led to the brush connector on that side. Thought about splicing it back together, but after this much work, decided instead to buy a new field and found it for $53. at a tool parts supplier in Utah. Replacing the motor mounted fan as well, which had some broken vanes, and was probably the reason I’d had less than perfect chip ejection for a while. Sure hope this solves my problem.

View DocWithManyHats's profile

DocWithManyHats

67 posts in 3658 days


#10 posted 03-03-2021 01:31 PM

Really old thread, but I just bought a used dw735 and was told it ate through brushes and stopped working. Did you ever figure out a remedy to your planer problem?

View GrenenstalNL's profile

GrenenstalNL

2 posts in 2014 days


#11 posted 03-03-2021 06:05 PM



Really old thread, but I just bought a used dw735 and was told it ate through brushes and stopped working. Did you ever figure out a remedy to your planer problem?

- DocWithManyHats

See post #5 in this thread, most likely that’s the problem. The info here has been sufficient for me for the most part. Read it carefully and disassemble the planer with care. You should be able to fix almost anything on this machine.

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