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Forum topic by scribble posted 05-12-2017 12:18 PM 762 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scribble

204 posts in 2621 days


05-12-2017 12:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw

I was given a newer 10” Delta bench top band saw a few months ago. I have cleaned it and followed snodgrasses video for setting one up. I set a fence and was trying to rip down some stock but when I started cutting the wood and the blade made a nice 45 deg angle cut towards my fence. I tried again with several pieces of the same oak and it did it the same every time. I know I must be doing something wrong but for the life of me can’t figure it out. The blade feels sharp but that probably isn’t the best way to tell if it is still good.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”


17 replies so far

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2939 posts in 1360 days


#1 posted 05-12-2017 01:52 PM

I think we need more information. Size of the blade would help. Thickness of the stock too. Also how does it cut without the use of the fence? Can you track a line without the fence? If so then you need to adjust your fence for drift.

Correct blade tension might be the issue. Also, you said you followed the video, so the gullets of the teeth are in the center of the tire on top? Also check that after setting the tilt, be sure to use the lock nut to hold the setting in place. These saws vibrate a lot and can cause that to move.

I’m no expert so maybe others who have been doing this much longer will also chime in.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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JayT

6226 posts in 2631 days


#2 posted 05-12-2017 02:21 PM

If your saw is set up well, then blade tension and sharp are the most common other factors. I’d try a new blade first. If it works, then you know it was the blade. If not, then you can look for other factors and have a spare blade that you will eventually need anyways.

Too fast of a feed rate will also cause &/or amplify the problem.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#3 posted 05-12-2017 03:26 PM

I have a ‘50s era 12” saw made by the Atlas Press Co. About 98% its use is to resaw. I was having a terrible time getting good results. Nasty drift, the blade was obviously bending in the cut because the face wasn’t always flat across the board after the cut. Sometimes it would bind so badly it froze the 3/4hp motor. I’d tensioned the blade to the max, but nothing seemed to help. The blade felt really sharp to the touch too.

The blade was an Olson resaw blade and so I decided to give one with better reviews a try. I got the Wood Slicer from Highland Woodworking and the difference was like night and day. Previously, I’d cut a board to width before resawing to keep it as narrow as possible, but with this, I can do a 6” board effortlessly, and with outstanding results.

The instructions that came with it said tension is one of the least important factors. I backed the tension off a few turns and it still cuts great — probably as good as the saw is capable of (not to mention the machine operator).

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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scribble

204 posts in 2621 days


#4 posted 05-12-2017 03:28 PM

The blade is 72.5” and the thickness was 3/4 so nothing excessively thick. I am just trying to reduce my cut out waste as much as possible otherwise I would just use my ripping blade. Yes the gullets are in the center of the convexed wheels, and the jamb nut is secured.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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GR8HUNTER

6223 posts in 1132 days


#5 posted 05-12-2017 03:34 PM

you can try and turn it run from other end …. IMHO that saw is not made for resawing ….just my 1 cent :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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builtinbkyn

2939 posts in 1360 days


#6 posted 05-12-2017 03:42 PM

I meant what size blade in terms of width – ie. 1/8”, 1/4” etc. Did you try making the cut without the fence?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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scribble

204 posts in 2621 days


#7 posted 05-12-2017 03:53 PM

I can’t make a straight cut without a fence to save my life. It did do the same without the fence. I am not sure on the size but I believe 1/4” is what sticks in my head.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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builtinbkyn

2939 posts in 1360 days


#8 posted 05-12-2017 04:36 PM



I can t make a straight cut without a fence to save my life. It did do the same without the fence. I am not sure on the size but I believe 1/4” is what sticks in my head.

- scribble


Not being critical, but most of the work you’ll do on your BS is without the fence. It’s what makes a BS special tool. It can be used to cut curves as well as straight lines, but generally following a line and freehand. Not that a BS can’t be used for doing so, but there are other means of achieving a straight line rather than a BS.

Give the saw a try without the fence. Draw a line that’s straight and then maybe some curves. See if it tracks as you think it should. If not then maybe there’s something else wrong with it. Check to see if the wheels aren’t loose. Double check the guides. Back them off all the way to ensure the blade isn’t being deflected by misaligned guides. Check the table to ensure the blade is perpendicular to the table surface. There are lots of variables, but you can check them all.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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GR8HUNTER

6223 posts in 1132 days


#9 posted 05-12-2017 05:57 PM



I can t make a straight cut without a fence to save my life. It did do the same without the fence. I am not sure on the size but I believe 1/4” is what sticks in my head.

- scribble


1/4” blade is mostly made for curve cuts …find out what max is you can put on the saw …put that on ..and try that ... :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Rich's profile

Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#10 posted 05-12-2017 08:55 PM

Things you probably got from the tune up video, but I haven’t seen mentioned here. Make sure your blade guides are set properly. Be sure you lower the guard close to the wood. You don’t want inches of bare, unsupported blade above the cut.

That’s about it. My first reply was assuming you were resawing. There, you need to find your drift angle and compensate for it if you want to use a straight fence. I really can’t imagine having the sort of drift you’re describing on a 3/4” board though. It should just plow right through that.

BTW, Tony’s point is a good one. I’m sure that saw can handle a 1/2” blade. Since you’re trying to cut straight lines, you want a wide blade.

Again, something that was likely in the video, but I’ll say it anyway, smooth the back edges of the blade by using a stone, or diamond plate by carefully rolling it around the back of the blade with the saw running. Mainly, you just want to take the sharp edge off the back corners.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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richardchaos

583 posts in 800 days


#11 posted 05-12-2017 10:01 PM

This is the BANDSAW GOD!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#12 posted 05-12-2017 10:04 PM



This is the BANDSAW GOD!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

- richardchaos

Scribble said he followed that video in his original post. Right there in the second sentence.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

248 posts in 953 days


#13 posted 05-12-2017 10:52 PM

IMHO that saw is not made for resawing ….just my 1 cent :<))

- GR8HUNTER

This is exactly right, that saw is a light duty saw made for cutting curves. (1 inch thick hard wood, 2 inch in soft wood)

that said, If the saw is set up right, the tension is good and the blade cups, wanders or deflects to one side in a cut the problem is the blade. (You say it feels sharp to your finger, a sharp blade will not just feel sharp, it will rip the flesh off when you get close)

The shop has a 22 inch that is used for resawing, It has a 3/4 blade, 6 teeth per inch on it. (I would use a wider one, but 3/4 is the widest I can weld accurately)

Even a set up like this will not last long resawing oak.

I have seen that little saw in operation, It is a good saw, and will do what it is designed to do. find someone local and have them make you some good blades. (most people who sharpen can do this.) You probably should stay at 1/4 and 12-14 teeth per inch,

If you need to resaw something; joint it straight, make cuts top and bottom on the table saw and use the bandsaw to cut the middle where your table saw wont reach

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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scribble

204 posts in 2621 days


#14 posted 05-13-2017 05:23 AM

picked up a new olson 3/8 4tpi blade on the way home. Compared to the 1/8” blade that was in there this one is actually sharp. I wasn’t able to run any wood through it as it was past 11 but will hopefully get to try it after work tomorrow. I hope I am correct in my intentions for this tool to rip my 3/4 stock down to try and eliminate as much waste as possible for my cabinet door project.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

View pontic's profile

pontic

694 posts in 1029 days


#15 posted 05-13-2017 12:02 PM

Resawing is all about TPI and rake.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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