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Suggestions for hiding exposed wood due to shrinkage

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Forum topic by Rich posted 05-09-2017 04:35 PM 687 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rich

4555 posts in 1008 days


05-09-2017 04:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

This is the dry season here in southern Arizona. As a result many door panels have shrunk in their frames, and exposed unfinished wood. This is true for the entry door I built for the entrance from the garage, and our kitchen cabinets, which I did not build but are finished in a similar way. I think now is a good time to deal with it, since the panels will swell back up when monsoon season rolls around.

You can see what I mean in the photo below. It’s not going to be easy to blend into the existing finish, so what I’m considering is a dark glaze that I can apply, and wipe, leaving some behind to hide the raw wood. I think the glaze would be opaque enough. I tried a wood marker down in a corner, and it’s not opaque enough.

Unfortunately, I can’t do test boards easily, which is my standard way to test finishes before doing the final piece. I can do tests on small areas down on the door where it won’t be seen too well.

Here’s the photo. I hope it’s clear enough to see what the current situation is. Any suggestions are welcome.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki


6 replies so far

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TungOil

1273 posts in 914 days


#1 posted 05-09-2017 04:45 PM

You might want to try a touch up pen. I know Minwax sells them to match their line of stains, I would imagine other manufacturers have them as well. For those that are not familiar, a touch up per is like a felt tip marker with a chisel tip, loaded with your stain color.

I try to pre-finish my panels (or at least pre-stain them) to avoid this very issue.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Rich

4555 posts in 1008 days


#2 posted 05-09-2017 05:07 PM

I agree about pre-finishing. However this door weighs in excess of 80 lbs, and I figured getting through the final glue up without damaging it was unlikely. In hindsight, putting stain around the perimeter of the panel to color it would have been wise. That’s why it’s 20/20 :)

I tried the touchup pen. That was what I was referring to with the wood marker reference. I found it not to be opaque enough, and while it did color the bare wood, the overall look was not very good.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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TungOil

1273 posts in 914 days


#3 posted 05-09-2017 05:50 PM

I find that with the Minwax pens I need to apply a few times to blend it adequately. I’d rather have this then have it be too dark first application…..Also I shake the heck out of the pen before I use it. Maybe try a couple more applications will do it?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Rich

4555 posts in 1008 days


#4 posted 05-09-2017 06:16 PM

You mention shaking it. Are those the type that have the piston inside that you feel when you shake it? The one I tried was just something I found laying around, and is nothing more than a chisel-point magic marker. It’s made for touch ups, but is pretty cheap looking.

I haven’t used the Minwax pen, but the pens I have used that required shaking and pumping the tip to prime it had a good, thick flow. That might be just what I need. It sure would be easier than trying to mess around with glaze on a vertical surface. I’m sure as heck not going to take the door off to do it.

I’ll pick one up. Thanks for the advice.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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TungOil

1273 posts in 914 days


#5 posted 05-09-2017 06:21 PM

yes exactly, there is a piston inside and you have to shake it vigorously then press the tip to prime it. Minwax has a pretty wide selection of color, you might find one close enough to work for your application.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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OSU55

2357 posts in 2408 days


#6 posted 05-10-2017 03:17 PM

I would go with the glazing….....

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