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Broken Set Screw on DeWalt 1030 Yoke

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Forum topic by CordWood posted 02-26-2017 06:14 AM 1518 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CordWood

25 posts in 1604 days


02-26-2017 06:14 AM

Topic tags/keywords: radial arm saw dewalt restoration restoring

I’m afraid I may have already made a big mistake in restoring the DeWalt 1030 radial arm saw I recently picked up.

I got the base and arm all cleaned up and I separated the rollerhead, yoke, and motor from the arm for cleaning and to disassemble the motor. The motor is completely disassembled now and I plan to order bearings on Monday.

But in trying to disassemble clean the yoke I broke off the set screw. I had PB Blastered it like everything else, but the corrosion on the aluminum was bad and the head snapped off. I tried to drill into the screw and extract it with the screw extraction tool I used on all the other rusted-out bolts I’ve been replacing, but this set screw is truly set.

I saw a commenter on the OWWG forums say he solved this sort of problem using this violent method:

“I beat the king bolt out, dealt with the set screw sticking out, and then found a spot to make a kinda diagonal hole for a new set screw I was able to obtain.”

Should I try this? Should I try to find a different yolk? I’m not sure of how to proceed as I feel like I’m stuck with options that may just damage the yoke.

-- "What man has done, man can do."


12 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6919 posts in 3545 days


#1 posted 02-26-2017 01:05 PM

Bear in mind that those parts are all hard to find, so as they, “do no harm”. The process described sounds a little harsh…and I’d skip that for the moment. So far I guess you haven’t joined the Dewalt forum, but some of the guys there may have a much better approach. If the goal is to just separate the yoke from the roller head, you could take a Dremel and cut the locking arm off the nut, and then unscrew the nut. That should allow the yoke to separate, you would then have to have the arm welded back onto the nut. But that wouldn’t allow you to remove/repair the dog point screw or the king bolt. You might be able to take the rollerhead to a machine shop and have them drill the screw out, but there really isn’t a good approach But if all else fails, then the OWWM suggestion may be the only recourse.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View mike02130's profile

mike02130

170 posts in 1724 days


#2 posted 02-26-2017 01:20 PM

I once took a part with a broken bolt to a machine shop. The guy had some sort of machine that had like an electric arc, for lack of a better word, that went tick tick tick that was able to remove the bolt bit by bit. Something like an arc welder, but not. Sorry for the lame explanation.

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

View CordWood's profile

CordWood

25 posts in 1604 days


#3 posted 02-26-2017 02:57 PM

Fred, I did join the DeWalt RAS forum at Delphi Forums and at least applied to OWWM.org, but I need admin approval of my account. Here’s my post on the DeWalt RAS forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/messages/8206/2

I think I’ll either end up leaving it alone and forget disassembling the yoke/roller head so long as the saw still works fine. I really just wanted to wipe away the 50 years of sawdust and the plaster-like powder that has coated the rest of the saw.

I may end up taking the whole thing to a machine shop.

Also, now that Wolfe isn’t doing work on old DeWalts, does Bradley (their successor company in the field) do work like rebuilding old motors? Could I send this whole thing to them given their expertise?

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6919 posts in 3545 days


#4 posted 02-26-2017 05:10 PM

Wait and see what happens at the Dewalt forum, the traffic over there is slow at times and it may take a few days for the right folks to see your question. I may not have this right, but I think Wolfe still works on old Dewalts, but not the small ones. No idea about Bradley, never heard of them. Rebuilding that motor isn’t much more than changing bearings; that’s all I’ve ever done and that’s on 4 different motors ( I did have to clean the contacts on one and put a new capacitor on another) . Any motor shop should be able to do that for you if you want to farm it out. You said the motor is completely disassembled, you could just take the rotor to the motor shop and ask them to install new bearings. Just a comment, Wolfe told a good friend of mine (who has a 1030 round arm) some years back that when they rework those motors, they remove the brake. The explanation was that it just presents some possible parts that can break off inside the motor and do some serious damage. I’ve never heard of anyone who had that problem, but those brakes are mostly toast anyway (usually) and you can’t get parts. You might want to consider just removing it altogether.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View CordWood's profile

CordWood

25 posts in 1604 days


#5 posted 02-26-2017 05:38 PM

I think I’ll do the bearing replacememt myself.

Should I preemptively replace the capacitor? That seems to be a cheap $7 part and mine looks original to the saw.

Any advice on ckeaning the motor? What solvents, if any, should I use? I’ve heard people mention “electronics cleaner” in videos, but I don’t refer they are that referencing.

Here’s Bradley’s web page, which comes up in a search for Wolfe and is references a elsewhere because of Wolfes’s closing in August of 2016:

http://teambtf.com/woodworking-tools/

Thank you for the tip regarding the brake.

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6919 posts in 3545 days


#6 posted 02-26-2017 05:47 PM

Other than blowing the dust out of it, and wiping off any that may remain, I wouldn’t do anything else for cleaning. The capacitor is up to you, I probably wouldn’t worry about it; if its working there’s little reason to replace it. Thank you for that link, I did not realize Wolfe had closed their doors. That’s probably been a topic over at the Dewalt forum, but I don’t frequent it nearly as much as I used to.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Roy Turbett's profile

Roy Turbett

177 posts in 4631 days


#7 posted 02-27-2017 01:26 AM

Fred has the right idea about cutting the handle off with a Dremmel tool to remove the nut. This will expose the dog point screw. It is very hard to drill because the screw itself is so hard and you frequently end up with a much larger hole. But since the screw is much harder than the aluminum yoke, it can be driven through with a punch. You may even be able to rethread the same hole with the same size or slightly larger tap. When you weld the handle back on it will be as good as new.

View CordWood's profile

CordWood

25 posts in 1604 days


#8 posted 03-27-2017 07:13 PM

Okay, so the yoke is the yoke and I’m going to let it be. The machine should be fine with my little mistake there reminding me to be humble.

In the meantime, I’ve finally gotten myself a set of gear and bearing pullers and a shop press. I’ve totally disassembled the motor and ordered the bearings from Lynn at Accurate Bearing. She was very kind and patient, thought I measured everything beforehand and knew I needed the Nachi 6203LL and Nachi 6201LL bearings. I ordered two of each so I have a backup just in case I screw something up.

What’s the best method for pushing the bearings back onto the shaft? My main questions here is how do I keep pressure on just the inner race? Can I use the back side of the bearing puller and tighten it up so that the opening between the two halves is very, very small and hugs the shaft? Is there a better method for doing this in the shop press?

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6919 posts in 3545 days


#9 posted 03-27-2017 08:40 PM

You could use a socket, that’s what I did. Bummer you couldn’t come up with a solution on the dog-point screw. Anyway, select a deep well socket the presses on the inner race. For the record I’ve also use the clamshell (that’s what I call that bearing splitter thingy) I’ll tell ya’, I even warmed the bearing up with a light bulb and had them slip right on….there’s no end of ways to do it, I guess. if you do the light bulb trick, they do get a little hot….wear gloves.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8503 posts in 3250 days


#10 posted 03-27-2017 08:52 PM

I’ve replaced hundreds of bearings and never used a press… well, I actually did -once-, but that was just because I had it sitting in front of me and thought I’d give it a whirl. Could have just as easily used a C-clamp :) Like Fred said, properly sized sockets work well, as do appropriately sized pipes, even PVC. The heat trick works as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View CordWood's profile

CordWood

25 posts in 1604 days


#11 posted 03-27-2017 09:11 PM

What do you do when you need to drive a bearing on farther than the depth of the socket? The bearing puller (clamshell) seems like a better bet at that point.

Are there little sets of press pipes, for lack of a better name, that I could get as accessories for my press? Or is there a pipe tool with multiple openings on the end to perfectly fit the inner race of bearings?

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2839 posts in 3348 days


#12 posted 03-27-2017 09:46 PM

Is enough of the bolt present to weld a nut over it? I did that once, the heat/cool cycle from welding will help break things free.

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