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Forum topic by Gregg M. posted 01-20-2017 12:09 AM 3773 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gregg M.

224 posts in 2971 days


01-20-2017 12:09 AM

Topic tags/keywords: live-edge bar top slab joints bar top install question

I am making a U-shaped live edge bar from 8/4 black walnut slabs. The sections are approx 3’x13’x3’ all 14-18” wide. The 13’ front section will be two slabs butted together to make a 13’ long section. I didn’t get a slab long enough to make that a single section so I have to make it out of two sections. The two returns on each end will be mitered at 45s. I have the following questions.

1) How best to cut the 45 miters so that they form a tight joint that will not open up. Leaning towards using a straight edge and routing both sections together and using splines or tenons to keep them aligned.

2) How best to join the two slabs to make the 13’ section. Should it be a straight butt joint with splines or loose tenons? What about a lap joint?

3) How best to anchor the bar to the 2×4 wall that it will go on top of. not planning on using corbels.

Any other thoughts or expertise is welcome.

Thanks Gregg

-- Marvel Woodworking, West Chester, PA - http://www.MarvelWoodworking.com


4 replies so far

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papadan

3584 posts in 4658 days


#1 posted 01-20-2017 05:29 AM

Yes on using the router and straight edge to joint the sections, including the center of the long front. I would use dowels to join the sections and with this being 2” Walnut, I would use 3/4” dowels. I would mount the top to the frame with large screws (1/4”) through the frame from underneath.

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EngineerChic

34 posts in 1793 days


#2 posted 01-20-2017 12:57 PM

On the mitered corners, could you do a half-lap mitered joint to increase the surface area for the glue (and decrease the chance that a sliver of space allows light thru, which just highlights the imperfection)? Live edge complicates things but there has to be a way to get some small overlap in those joints.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

962 posts in 2731 days


#3 posted 01-20-2017 06:14 PM


1) How best to cut the 45 miters so that they form a tight joint that will not open up….

This could be a problem, due to wood movement. Since wood expands and contracts along its width, but not along the length, the miter angle will change as the humidity changes.

If your bar is in a humidity-controlled environment, you’re OK, but if you have humidity changes, you will need to allow the 3’ legs of the top float to accommodate wood movement.

I would put in some mechanical fasteners (like a “Tite-Joint” fastener, or other counter-top bolt) at the miters, and use slotted screw holes to fasten the top to the sub-structure.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Gregg M.'s profile

Gregg M.

224 posts in 2971 days


#4 posted 01-21-2017 02:03 PM

thanks for the advice.


1) How best to cut the 45 miters so that they form a tight joint that will not open up….
This could be a problem, due to wood movement. Since wood expands and contracts along its width, but not along the length, the miter angle will change as the humidity changes.

If your bar is in a humidity-controlled environment, you re OK, but if you have humidity changes, you will need to allow the 3 legs of the top float to accommodate wood movement.

I would put in some mechanical fasteners (like a “Tite-Joint” fastener, or other counter-top bolt) at the miters, and use slotted screw holes to fasten the top to the sub-structure.
- jerryminer


-- Marvel Woodworking, West Chester, PA - http://www.MarvelWoodworking.com

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