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Forum topic by Rayman24 posted 12-27-2016 02:49 AM 989 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rayman24

30 posts in 2932 days


12-27-2016 02:49 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cutting board drum sander

I have recently been getting several requests from friends and family for end grain cutting boards. Now i usually make 2-3 a year, but this year i have a lot more people wanting them. My biggest hold up when it comes to making the cutting boards is the amount of sanding time required, so it takes me a few weeks to complete just 1. Since I have never used a drum sander before I thought I would reach out to my fellow woodworking community.

So my questions are…

Is a drum sander worth the investment?

Would a drum sander significantly reduce the finish time for the cutting boards?

Are they a pain in the butt to maintain?

Any other advice or information I should know please feel free to reply. Thanks again for help…it is appreciated!!

-- Rayman24


6 replies so far

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bruc101

1377 posts in 4145 days


#1 posted 12-27-2016 02:59 AM

I make lot of end grain cutting boards in the period of a year. I’ve always used a drum sander. One of the key things is try to get the glue ups as even as possible.

I made three end grain boards out of yellow pine for one of my dealers a month ago. Less than 10 minutes through the drum sander, 15 minutes with the ROS and I was done, and that was with all 3 boards.

-- Bruce Free Plans https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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Rayman24

30 posts in 2932 days


#2 posted 12-27-2016 03:18 AM

Wow…that is a lot faster than sanding by hand. Have you ran a maple/walnut cutting board through the drum sander? If so how did the machine handle the harder wood?

-- Rayman24

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bruc101

1377 posts in 4145 days


#3 posted 12-27-2016 04:29 AM

End gran in yellow pine is plenty hard. I’ve used just about every domestic wood available and had no problems or slow downs sanding.

I use 120 grit on my drums sander for everything. I use a 6” D handle Porter Cable ROS to finish sanding almost everything, I use a Performax 22-44 drum sander I bought in the early 90’s.

I’ve got 2 White oak, 1 Walnut and 1 Curly Maple end grain boards in the clamps right now. I should have oil on them by 9:30 am in the morning. They should ship the next morning.

-- Bruce Free Plans https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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boyddavid

2 posts in 1119 days


#4 posted 12-27-2016 09:44 AM

Automatic tool several times increase productivity. It is necessary to choose the tool powerful and grit.

-- My blog http://protoolsreviews.com

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

102 posts in 1723 days


#5 posted 12-27-2016 01:37 PM



Wow…that is a lot faster than sanding by hand. Have you ran a maple/walnut cutting board through the drum sander? If so how did the machine handle the harder wood?

- Rayman24


I actually find that mine handles harder woods better than soft ones that tend to clog the abrasive more.

Especially if you use softer woods with more pitch, one of those rubber blocks like a giant gum eraser designed to unclog the paper is helpful. Either way I recommend having one handy and using it as needed. They are also great for other sanders and extend the life of the abrasives which get easily overheated if clogged. I actually use it more form my bench top belt and disc sanders, so it sees a lot of use.

Changing the abrasive strips is a bit of a pain on my drum sander, but they last pretty well if kept unclogged. Otherwise it is not a high maintenance item, at least mine hasn’t been.

It was one of my greatest labor savers and once I bought it I wondered how I ever got along without it.

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PeteStaehling

102 posts in 1723 days


#6 posted 12-27-2016 01:40 PM

Bottom line… If the budget allows I highly recommend one.

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