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Forum topic by gizmodyne posted 12-29-2007 05:37 PM 15287 views 13 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gizmodyne

1780 posts in 4485 days


12-29-2007 05:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: arts and crafts finish

I have been struggling with finding a good Arts and Crafts finish.

Here is an interesting document by Jeff Jewitt on how to simulate the modern L.G.& J. Finishes with a hand application.

All of his finishes involve Dye, then Waterlox, Glaze, and a Finish coat.

What do you all think?

I would love to see a repository here of people’s arts and crafts finish recipes for white oak. (With specific dye colors.)

Dan?

Dusty?

John Nixon?

Max?

I know you got ‘em.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke."


5 replies so far

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 4551 days


#1 posted 12-29-2007 05:57 PM

I have used my 12 step mission stain process with great success on white oak.

Here it is for those who would like to try this, this also works well for red oak.

The staining process I use now replaced a number of different ones I used to use. A number of the ones I used to use I found inconsistent, toxic, hard to use, or simply inadequate. I find this one gives me the most consistent results for mission look with out all the pitfalls such as the toxic fumes from ammonia fuming.

I know there are many ways to stain mission and I merely have found this one to work the best for me.

I’m not saying it is the best; merely it has worked well for over 200 pieces of mission furniture in the last 3 years.

1. Use a natural stainable wood filer, where needed.
2. Sand to 100 grit finish.
3. Sand to final 220 finish
4. Mix water soluble yellow dye and let sit 12 hours. (then hand apply with cheesecloth).
5. After yellow dye is applied and dry, hand sand with 400 ( the water based stain will raise grain of wood)
6. Apply your first coat of mixed stain or use Red Mahogany (results are close) , use a soft cloth or disposable paper rag and gloves
7. Let dry and apply second coat stain by hand rubbing in to the wood firmly.
8. Apply a 2lb cut amber Shellac, let dry completely.
9. Apply another coat of cut Shellac.
10. Hand sand with 400 and tack coat dust off wood.
11. Apply 3 coats of Arm-R-Seal. Letting dry between coats.
12 Touch up as needed.

As always, avoid glue or smearing glue on your project. If you have any glue REMOVE IT COMPLETELY prior to staining.

For those of you who would like to see the finish results just look at my project postings there are several posted.

I hope this is is helpful. For those of you who use HLVP sprayers this also works well. I prefer hand application however have used the sprayer in the past while perfecting this process. Any questions please ask, I will do my best to try help.

-- Dusty

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4358 days


#2 posted 12-29-2007 08:29 PM

I am just finishing a large project that is dark oak. It is Red Oak. I used TransTint Golden Brown at a rate of 120 drops per pint of alcohol and applied until I was happy with it followed by two coats of Light Walnut Danish oil. I’ll probably end with a wax rubbed on because they want it non shiny. I just call it old oak.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 4495 days


#3 posted 12-30-2007 07:19 AM

I have had to match trim in old houses and I used an orange dye mixed with alcohol or lacquer thinner as the carrier, I hate sanding raised grain. It’s easily avoidable work. Then I use the color stain that I want. It keeps the amber tone underneath because it is what is absorbed first. I like to use the Sherwood wiping stains because I can topcoat with lacquer in 30 minutes. I get a precat lacquer from Sherwin that has an amber tone and it is a dead ringer for an oil base finish but dries fast. I can’t remember the package number on the lacquer but you can tint the lacquer with dye as well or do some toning.

I rely on the Sherwin store to provide me with a product I can open and go to work with. I want the look without all the work.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Hellaenergy's profile

Hellaenergy

53 posts in 4132 days


#4 posted 01-23-2009 08:05 PM

I think this is the link gizmodyne was trying to post:

http://www.homesteadfinishing.com/pdf/mission_oak_rev4-2008.pdf

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1027 posts in 3881 days


#5 posted 01-25-2009 10:09 PM

Another Jeff Jewitt technique. This may be a duplicate of Hellaenergy post above. I didn’t compare. Mission is pretty close to A&C, right?

http://antiquerestorers.com/Articles/jeff/mission_oak_finish.htm

-- Better woodworking through old hand tools.

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