LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
You're off to a good start, let's say that was 3 paragraphs but only because your a Spagnuolo convert. This is a great place with so much to learn about. And remember…knowing is half the battle…GI Joe!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
998 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
meh you're no Snake Eyes, but welcome anyways :D hehe

\o/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
Thanks for serving our country. I admire everyone from the miltary. I am new to woodworking too. I have been here on Lumberjocks since the beginning of the year. Everyone is really friendly. I think you will like it here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,616 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
Welcome to LJ and thanks for your service!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,760 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
welcome to LJ's ,
thanks for joining ,

and thanks for your service !

anything we can do to help ,
just ask .

enjoy !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
Welcome brother. Look forward to seeing your work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,691 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
welcome to lumberjocks…pilgrim. Looking forward to seeing the shop pics, and projects too.
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
17,103 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
Thanks for serving and welcome to LJ. Being a tank platoon commander I assume you either have or will be getting some impressive powerful machines installed in your garage. We will look forward to seeing your shop when you are ready.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
HI, my name is Doug and I am addicted to LumberJocks. I too, found LumberJocks from The Wood Whisperer.

Does this somehow sound like an introduction to another group?

I am also a veteran from a different era, and truly appreciate your service to our country.

Welcome to LumberJocks.

(Is this five paragraphs?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
WELCOME!!!!! I too am addicted to LJ's
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
Welcome and have fun and enjoy yourself.

We thank you for your service for our country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118,619 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
Welcome thanks for the intro. only one problem there's no know cure for the addiction. Thank you so much for your service to our country.
 

·
In Loving Memory
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
Introduction

Well, I figured my first blog should be an introduction. I found Lumberjocks through the Wood Whisperer site. For the last couple of weeks I would check the site at work and home, starting to build what I can only now call an addiction. I finally signed-up because I felt that if I was going to look, I should at least be able to contribute. a single paragraph.

I am a twice deployed Army Veteran, who was a tank platoon leader the first tour (in 03) and the division's commo officer for the night shift in 06, and yes I got the nickname Duke because I look like the character. While in the army I bought my first house and got bit by the DIY bug. After some home upgrades I started to wonder what else I could do with these tools. Needless to say I moved on to woodworking. I've made some cutting boards (a la Spagnuolo), a couple of quick bandsaw boxes and a lot of pens. At the moment, I am in the process of wiring my garage off a sub-panel because I am sick and tired of tripping over extension cords for my tools. Look for pics of my shop (garage) soon, as I continue to delve into woodworking.

I guess I can contribute two paragraphs…or does this count as three?
You look like Duke? The dog on the Beverly Hillbillies? :)

Welcome to LumberJocks and thank you for your service!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
WoodCraft Class, Houston TX

Yesterday was a good day, by almost any woodworking standard. Regrettably I didn't touch wood to a tool. So how can it be a good day? I got to spend it with David Marks of WoodWorks Fame. He taught a class at my local WoodCraft and my wife was kind enough to give me the day to go.

This was my second class with David; I took one about a year ago on Double-Bevel Marquetry (keep meaning to get a scroll saw, but something bigger and more powerful always seems to get in the way). The class was fantastic then, and was fantastic yesterday. David is a very open person, willing to answer any question with patience and kindness, taking the time to explain things until he is sure you understand. That is a rare gift, even among teachers, and I greatly appreciate him doing it for us. He also is fantastic at remembering names, which I don't know how he does with all the people that end up in front of him every year.

So yesterday's class was about setting up your bandsaw for cutting veneers, which is something I am very curious about (maybe because I actually have a bandsaw?). He took us through how to tension a blade, the benefits and drawbacks of various methods (including tensioning systems that don't match up one to one on measurements), as well as how to set-up the guides on the saw once the blade is tensioned. Again, benefits and drawbacks were discussed for each type of guide bearing. We then took a break for bandsaw maintenance, since apparently a washer was missing in the tension pulley assembly and a new one was needed. This resulted in a member of the class actually fabricating one in the room out of oak (temporary fix, but still impressive). Thank you Jeremy Grubs (http://jjhgwoodworks.com/), who btw is an accomplished wood celebrity in his own mind (and the Houston area)!

After the repair, David showed us a technique to determine drift angle on a bandsaw blade. If you didn't know, each blade for a bandsaw has a direction that it wants to cut in. When cutting a straight line, the blade will want to push the wood left or right (or if you are really really lucky, straight). That push is called drift. You don't want to fight drift, you want to accommodate it. I won't tell here how to find it, but I am sure that a lot of LJs have their own techniques and will be willing to share. I will share the technique once my shop is wired and I can try it on my own bandsaw (don't want to preach something I haven't tried myself).

From there it was a lunch at Chili's with David and 20 other woodworkers from the Houston area. Needless to say the conversation turned to ongoing projects, where to find the best lumbers, local clubs, and of course the pie-in-the-sky furniture ideas that you just can't seem to get to work out right…

After lunch we went back to the class and started getting into laminations, glue preferences, and how to build forms for different style laminations. A vacuum press was used to demonstrate several techniques, and David even had several recent pieces to pass around with him. The afternoon portion was fantastic.

Overall, a great day, with one low point… My 10 megapixel camera couldn't take a decent picture to save it's life! Apparently there is a problem with the stabilization protocol in the camera… What a crappy time for it to die on me. But… I have contact info for a couple of people who had cameras that did work, so I will try to provide some pictures in the near future. Now I just need to find some time to get to Sketch-up and recreate some of the jigs he showed us…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
WoodCraft Class, Houston TX

Yesterday was a good day, by almost any woodworking standard. Regrettably I didn't touch wood to a tool. So how can it be a good day? I got to spend it with David Marks of WoodWorks Fame. He taught a class at my local WoodCraft and my wife was kind enough to give me the day to go.

This was my second class with David; I took one about a year ago on Double-Bevel Marquetry (keep meaning to get a scroll saw, but something bigger and more powerful always seems to get in the way). The class was fantastic then, and was fantastic yesterday. David is a very open person, willing to answer any question with patience and kindness, taking the time to explain things until he is sure you understand. That is a rare gift, even among teachers, and I greatly appreciate him doing it for us. He also is fantastic at remembering names, which I don't know how he does with all the people that end up in front of him every year.

So yesterday's class was about setting up your bandsaw for cutting veneers, which is something I am very curious about (maybe because I actually have a bandsaw?). He took us through how to tension a blade, the benefits and drawbacks of various methods (including tensioning systems that don't match up one to one on measurements), as well as how to set-up the guides on the saw once the blade is tensioned. Again, benefits and drawbacks were discussed for each type of guide bearing. We then took a break for bandsaw maintenance, since apparently a washer was missing in the tension pulley assembly and a new one was needed. This resulted in a member of the class actually fabricating one in the room out of oak (temporary fix, but still impressive). Thank you Jeremy Grubs (http://jjhgwoodworks.com/), who btw is an accomplished wood celebrity in his own mind (and the Houston area)!

After the repair, David showed us a technique to determine drift angle on a bandsaw blade. If you didn't know, each blade for a bandsaw has a direction that it wants to cut in. When cutting a straight line, the blade will want to push the wood left or right (or if you are really really lucky, straight). That push is called drift. You don't want to fight drift, you want to accommodate it. I won't tell here how to find it, but I am sure that a lot of LJs have their own techniques and will be willing to share. I will share the technique once my shop is wired and I can try it on my own bandsaw (don't want to preach something I haven't tried myself).

From there it was a lunch at Chili's with David and 20 other woodworkers from the Houston area. Needless to say the conversation turned to ongoing projects, where to find the best lumbers, local clubs, and of course the pie-in-the-sky furniture ideas that you just can't seem to get to work out right…

After lunch we went back to the class and started getting into laminations, glue preferences, and how to build forms for different style laminations. A vacuum press was used to demonstrate several techniques, and David even had several recent pieces to pass around with him. The afternoon portion was fantastic.

Overall, a great day, with one low point… My 10 megapixel camera couldn't take a decent picture to save it's life! Apparently there is a problem with the stabilization protocol in the camera… What a crappy time for it to die on me. But… I have contact info for a couple of people who had cameras that did work, so I will try to provide some pictures in the near future. Now I just need to find some time to get to Sketch-up and recreate some of the jigs he showed us…
I AM SO BUMMED THAT I MISSED THIS!

sigh.

I'm glad you had a good time. Maybe next time I'll pay attention to those woodcraft class schedules …
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
WoodCraft Class, Houston TX

Yesterday was a good day, by almost any woodworking standard. Regrettably I didn't touch wood to a tool. So how can it be a good day? I got to spend it with David Marks of WoodWorks Fame. He taught a class at my local WoodCraft and my wife was kind enough to give me the day to go.

This was my second class with David; I took one about a year ago on Double-Bevel Marquetry (keep meaning to get a scroll saw, but something bigger and more powerful always seems to get in the way). The class was fantastic then, and was fantastic yesterday. David is a very open person, willing to answer any question with patience and kindness, taking the time to explain things until he is sure you understand. That is a rare gift, even among teachers, and I greatly appreciate him doing it for us. He also is fantastic at remembering names, which I don't know how he does with all the people that end up in front of him every year.

So yesterday's class was about setting up your bandsaw for cutting veneers, which is something I am very curious about (maybe because I actually have a bandsaw?). He took us through how to tension a blade, the benefits and drawbacks of various methods (including tensioning systems that don't match up one to one on measurements), as well as how to set-up the guides on the saw once the blade is tensioned. Again, benefits and drawbacks were discussed for each type of guide bearing. We then took a break for bandsaw maintenance, since apparently a washer was missing in the tension pulley assembly and a new one was needed. This resulted in a member of the class actually fabricating one in the room out of oak (temporary fix, but still impressive). Thank you Jeremy Grubs (http://jjhgwoodworks.com/), who btw is an accomplished wood celebrity in his own mind (and the Houston area)!

After the repair, David showed us a technique to determine drift angle on a bandsaw blade. If you didn't know, each blade for a bandsaw has a direction that it wants to cut in. When cutting a straight line, the blade will want to push the wood left or right (or if you are really really lucky, straight). That push is called drift. You don't want to fight drift, you want to accommodate it. I won't tell here how to find it, but I am sure that a lot of LJs have their own techniques and will be willing to share. I will share the technique once my shop is wired and I can try it on my own bandsaw (don't want to preach something I haven't tried myself).

From there it was a lunch at Chili's with David and 20 other woodworkers from the Houston area. Needless to say the conversation turned to ongoing projects, where to find the best lumbers, local clubs, and of course the pie-in-the-sky furniture ideas that you just can't seem to get to work out right…

After lunch we went back to the class and started getting into laminations, glue preferences, and how to build forms for different style laminations. A vacuum press was used to demonstrate several techniques, and David even had several recent pieces to pass around with him. The afternoon portion was fantastic.

Overall, a great day, with one low point… My 10 megapixel camera couldn't take a decent picture to save it's life! Apparently there is a problem with the stabilization protocol in the camera… What a crappy time for it to die on me. But… I have contact info for a couple of people who had cameras that did work, so I will try to provide some pictures in the near future. Now I just need to find some time to get to Sketch-up and recreate some of the jigs he showed us…
Was that the SW Houston WoodCraft store? I bought the 14" Rikon bandsaw there when it was on sale in November, and I thought about attending this class. Since I haven't used a bandsaw at all I figured I'd look for more basic instruction first. Interestingly, the SW Houston store has a series of bandsaw demos this month which I'm hoping to attend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
WoodCraft Class, Houston TX

Yesterday was a good day, by almost any woodworking standard. Regrettably I didn't touch wood to a tool. So how can it be a good day? I got to spend it with David Marks of WoodWorks Fame. He taught a class at my local WoodCraft and my wife was kind enough to give me the day to go.

This was my second class with David; I took one about a year ago on Double-Bevel Marquetry (keep meaning to get a scroll saw, but something bigger and more powerful always seems to get in the way). The class was fantastic then, and was fantastic yesterday. David is a very open person, willing to answer any question with patience and kindness, taking the time to explain things until he is sure you understand. That is a rare gift, even among teachers, and I greatly appreciate him doing it for us. He also is fantastic at remembering names, which I don't know how he does with all the people that end up in front of him every year.

So yesterday's class was about setting up your bandsaw for cutting veneers, which is something I am very curious about (maybe because I actually have a bandsaw?). He took us through how to tension a blade, the benefits and drawbacks of various methods (including tensioning systems that don't match up one to one on measurements), as well as how to set-up the guides on the saw once the blade is tensioned. Again, benefits and drawbacks were discussed for each type of guide bearing. We then took a break for bandsaw maintenance, since apparently a washer was missing in the tension pulley assembly and a new one was needed. This resulted in a member of the class actually fabricating one in the room out of oak (temporary fix, but still impressive). Thank you Jeremy Grubs (http://jjhgwoodworks.com/), who btw is an accomplished wood celebrity in his own mind (and the Houston area)!

After the repair, David showed us a technique to determine drift angle on a bandsaw blade. If you didn't know, each blade for a bandsaw has a direction that it wants to cut in. When cutting a straight line, the blade will want to push the wood left or right (or if you are really really lucky, straight). That push is called drift. You don't want to fight drift, you want to accommodate it. I won't tell here how to find it, but I am sure that a lot of LJs have their own techniques and will be willing to share. I will share the technique once my shop is wired and I can try it on my own bandsaw (don't want to preach something I haven't tried myself).

From there it was a lunch at Chili's with David and 20 other woodworkers from the Houston area. Needless to say the conversation turned to ongoing projects, where to find the best lumbers, local clubs, and of course the pie-in-the-sky furniture ideas that you just can't seem to get to work out right…

After lunch we went back to the class and started getting into laminations, glue preferences, and how to build forms for different style laminations. A vacuum press was used to demonstrate several techniques, and David even had several recent pieces to pass around with him. The afternoon portion was fantastic.

Overall, a great day, with one low point… My 10 megapixel camera couldn't take a decent picture to save it's life! Apparently there is a problem with the stabilization protocol in the camera… What a crappy time for it to die on me. But… I have contact info for a couple of people who had cameras that did work, so I will try to provide some pictures in the near future. Now I just need to find some time to get to Sketch-up and recreate some of the jigs he showed us…
Yes, it was the Southwest WoodCraft store. If you want to catch the material from the class (outside of the Q&A), there were some David Marks DVDs left behind, including a bandsaw one. To be honest, setting up for veneers is what is necessary to properly set-up the bandsaw for any operation. The DVD is roughly $35 dollars. A little expensive, but worth it. Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
WoodCraft Class, Houston TX

Yesterday was a good day, by almost any woodworking standard. Regrettably I didn't touch wood to a tool. So how can it be a good day? I got to spend it with David Marks of WoodWorks Fame. He taught a class at my local WoodCraft and my wife was kind enough to give me the day to go.

This was my second class with David; I took one about a year ago on Double-Bevel Marquetry (keep meaning to get a scroll saw, but something bigger and more powerful always seems to get in the way). The class was fantastic then, and was fantastic yesterday. David is a very open person, willing to answer any question with patience and kindness, taking the time to explain things until he is sure you understand. That is a rare gift, even among teachers, and I greatly appreciate him doing it for us. He also is fantastic at remembering names, which I don't know how he does with all the people that end up in front of him every year.

So yesterday's class was about setting up your bandsaw for cutting veneers, which is something I am very curious about (maybe because I actually have a bandsaw?). He took us through how to tension a blade, the benefits and drawbacks of various methods (including tensioning systems that don't match up one to one on measurements), as well as how to set-up the guides on the saw once the blade is tensioned. Again, benefits and drawbacks were discussed for each type of guide bearing. We then took a break for bandsaw maintenance, since apparently a washer was missing in the tension pulley assembly and a new one was needed. This resulted in a member of the class actually fabricating one in the room out of oak (temporary fix, but still impressive). Thank you Jeremy Grubs (http://jjhgwoodworks.com/), who btw is an accomplished wood celebrity in his own mind (and the Houston area)!

After the repair, David showed us a technique to determine drift angle on a bandsaw blade. If you didn't know, each blade for a bandsaw has a direction that it wants to cut in. When cutting a straight line, the blade will want to push the wood left or right (or if you are really really lucky, straight). That push is called drift. You don't want to fight drift, you want to accommodate it. I won't tell here how to find it, but I am sure that a lot of LJs have their own techniques and will be willing to share. I will share the technique once my shop is wired and I can try it on my own bandsaw (don't want to preach something I haven't tried myself).

From there it was a lunch at Chili's with David and 20 other woodworkers from the Houston area. Needless to say the conversation turned to ongoing projects, where to find the best lumbers, local clubs, and of course the pie-in-the-sky furniture ideas that you just can't seem to get to work out right…

After lunch we went back to the class and started getting into laminations, glue preferences, and how to build forms for different style laminations. A vacuum press was used to demonstrate several techniques, and David even had several recent pieces to pass around with him. The afternoon portion was fantastic.

Overall, a great day, with one low point… My 10 megapixel camera couldn't take a decent picture to save it's life! Apparently there is a problem with the stabilization protocol in the camera… What a crappy time for it to die on me. But… I have contact info for a couple of people who had cameras that did work, so I will try to provide some pictures in the near future. Now I just need to find some time to get to Sketch-up and recreate some of the jigs he showed us…
I was at the store Saturday for their first free bandsaw demo of the month. Jeremy Grubb got roped into doing it. He does the "build a handplane" class there. The machine was not in top condition, so Jeremy ended up going through a basic cleaning and more-or-less complete tuneup - new blade, setting guide blocks - before getting to the demo of setting the drift angle and cutting some veneer. It was about perfect for me. He really likes that DVD, and also mentioned a Marks DVD on hand cut dovetails that includes hand saw tuneup that might be even more expensive. I have a few projects ahead of learning those skills, but I'll probably go to the next free demo also - can't beat the price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118,619 Posts
WoodCraft Class, Houston TX

Yesterday was a good day, by almost any woodworking standard. Regrettably I didn't touch wood to a tool. So how can it be a good day? I got to spend it with David Marks of WoodWorks Fame. He taught a class at my local WoodCraft and my wife was kind enough to give me the day to go.

This was my second class with David; I took one about a year ago on Double-Bevel Marquetry (keep meaning to get a scroll saw, but something bigger and more powerful always seems to get in the way). The class was fantastic then, and was fantastic yesterday. David is a very open person, willing to answer any question with patience and kindness, taking the time to explain things until he is sure you understand. That is a rare gift, even among teachers, and I greatly appreciate him doing it for us. He also is fantastic at remembering names, which I don't know how he does with all the people that end up in front of him every year.

So yesterday's class was about setting up your bandsaw for cutting veneers, which is something I am very curious about (maybe because I actually have a bandsaw?). He took us through how to tension a blade, the benefits and drawbacks of various methods (including tensioning systems that don't match up one to one on measurements), as well as how to set-up the guides on the saw once the blade is tensioned. Again, benefits and drawbacks were discussed for each type of guide bearing. We then took a break for bandsaw maintenance, since apparently a washer was missing in the tension pulley assembly and a new one was needed. This resulted in a member of the class actually fabricating one in the room out of oak (temporary fix, but still impressive). Thank you Jeremy Grubs (http://jjhgwoodworks.com/), who btw is an accomplished wood celebrity in his own mind (and the Houston area)!

After the repair, David showed us a technique to determine drift angle on a bandsaw blade. If you didn't know, each blade for a bandsaw has a direction that it wants to cut in. When cutting a straight line, the blade will want to push the wood left or right (or if you are really really lucky, straight). That push is called drift. You don't want to fight drift, you want to accommodate it. I won't tell here how to find it, but I am sure that a lot of LJs have their own techniques and will be willing to share. I will share the technique once my shop is wired and I can try it on my own bandsaw (don't want to preach something I haven't tried myself).

From there it was a lunch at Chili's with David and 20 other woodworkers from the Houston area. Needless to say the conversation turned to ongoing projects, where to find the best lumbers, local clubs, and of course the pie-in-the-sky furniture ideas that you just can't seem to get to work out right…

After lunch we went back to the class and started getting into laminations, glue preferences, and how to build forms for different style laminations. A vacuum press was used to demonstrate several techniques, and David even had several recent pieces to pass around with him. The afternoon portion was fantastic.

Overall, a great day, with one low point… My 10 megapixel camera couldn't take a decent picture to save it's life! Apparently there is a problem with the stabilization protocol in the camera… What a crappy time for it to die on me. But… I have contact info for a couple of people who had cameras that did work, so I will try to provide some pictures in the near future. Now I just need to find some time to get to Sketch-up and recreate some of the jigs he showed us…
I wasn't there LOL
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top