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This is some wood that I picked up a few years ago at a very low price. I am not sure, it may be beech. As you see, the wood has some pretty serious splits. I guess that it was not dried properly. I could cut out or around the splits, but I do not know what to expect with what is cut out. I don't want to invest time working with something that will split or warp. I do not have a project in mind for this yet. I have been reluctant to use it.

What do you think? Garbage or treasure?



 

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Cut Around the Splits & Enjoy, Splits were more than likely from damp wood or climate change, but "after a few years" should be acclimated for your area.

Enjoy :)
 

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I tried to find it but I could not locate the video that Charles Neil produced on this. Basically he cut along the split following the grain of the wood with a bandsaw and glued it back together. He did this a total of 4 times on the slab that he was working on that had a split in it and eventually ended up removing the split entirely and was left with a solid board.
 

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It looks to me like those splits are too prominent to be caused by natural drying. The splits may be a result of internal stresses in the wood, like a tree forced to grow at an angle, or constantly having to brace into a prevailing wind. I think this is called "reactive" wood. If this is the case, internal stresses may still be evident.
Another possibility is that the tree was improperly cut down, causing it to split deeply as it broke loose.
 
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