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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Glenn Drake saves the day...twice.

I am currently building a small shelf out of Alder and some mystery white wood to house some of my finer tools so that I do not have to go into my larger cabinet to get them all the time. This is part of a larger initiative to keep my sharp tools sharp and accessible, as someone who only uses hand tools most of the time this is about as critical to my work-flow as paying the power bill before someone fires up their table saw. Roughly six hours got me to this point.


I really did not take any picture up to this point because my plan was to finish the project in about 8 hours and taking pictures slows me down (I am a bit of a camera nut), Working with a stolen 15 minutes here and there I was able to get the back panel fitted, which brings us to the reason for this post (but first a picture of the chaos…er work on my bench)


The back panel is made out of the aforementioned white mystery wood. It's not poplar as I first though. It's soft straight grained, smells awful, and is an absolute mystery to plane. It tears out in patches for no apparent reason, when I take a fine cut the result is crap, when I take a rough cut that would leave other woods pockmarked…glassy smooth?
?
One problem came from this wood and one from limitation of my tools.

I had already plowed the groove to receive the back panel using my Stanley 45 (shelves) and used my 1/4 chisel for the sides since it was a stop cut. Next came cutting the opposite sides of the joint into the back panel. The sides were simple scribe lines saw cuts, chisel a bit for clean up, done. The top and bottom is where I ran into trouble. I only own a 1/4 inch blade for my Stanley, and the rabbet that I needed to create was just a bit to deep for that. I did not feel confident that I could make two cuts accurately as I would eliminate my registration surface with the first cut, I ended up coming up with a faster way. I set my plane to cut to depth on the farthest right side of the joint (establishing the depth and side of the joint).


I then made a scribe line to the same depth as the plow with my marking gauge (a very deep scribe line using the A2 tool steel blade.).At this point I was able to push the extra piece into the joint and SNAP, right to the scribe line. A little work with a router plane cleaned up any inconsistency.




The bottom of the panel is a bit more complex since I have to make room for knots to be accessed through the back (for storage of planes). I made scribe lines and worked a bevel by hand with a smoother and a block plane. If I planed the bevel to the point that it would fit in the groove all the way I would have lost too much thickness, so I made small rabbet with my plow plane. Despite the deep scribe line I left, I got all this stringy crap coming off the back of the joint. I could have left it, this being the back of the cabinet, but I had an idea. I set my marking gauge to the depth of the worst of the tear-out and used my tool to shave away a nice clean edge.






A nice fit…happy shavings.


Aside, I almost always capitalize the names of wood that I am working with. I think of them as people…I'm strange, deal with it..
 

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Glenn Drake saves the day...twice.

I am currently building a small shelf out of Alder and some mystery white wood to house some of my finer tools so that I do not have to go into my larger cabinet to get them all the time. This is part of a larger initiative to keep my sharp tools sharp and accessible, as someone who only uses hand tools most of the time this is about as critical to my work-flow as paying the power bill before someone fires up their table saw. Roughly six hours got me to this point.


I really did not take any picture up to this point because my plan was to finish the project in about 8 hours and taking pictures slows me down (I am a bit of a camera nut), Working with a stolen 15 minutes here and there I was able to get the back panel fitted, which brings us to the reason for this post (but first a picture of the chaos…er work on my bench)


The back panel is made out of the aforementioned white mystery wood. It's not poplar as I first though. It's soft straight grained, smells awful, and is an absolute mystery to plane. It tears out in patches for no apparent reason, when I take a fine cut the result is crap, when I take a rough cut that would leave other woods pockmarked…glassy smooth?
?
One problem came from this wood and one from limitation of my tools.

I had already plowed the groove to receive the back panel using my Stanley 45 (shelves) and used my 1/4 chisel for the sides since it was a stop cut. Next came cutting the opposite sides of the joint into the back panel. The sides were simple scribe lines saw cuts, chisel a bit for clean up, done. The top and bottom is where I ran into trouble. I only own a 1/4 inch blade for my Stanley, and the rabbet that I needed to create was just a bit to deep for that. I did not feel confident that I could make two cuts accurately as I would eliminate my registration surface with the first cut, I ended up coming up with a faster way. I set my plane to cut to depth on the farthest right side of the joint (establishing the depth and side of the joint).


I then made a scribe line to the same depth as the plow with my marking gauge (a very deep scribe line using the A2 tool steel blade.).At this point I was able to push the extra piece into the joint and SNAP, right to the scribe line. A little work with a router plane cleaned up any inconsistency.




The bottom of the panel is a bit more complex since I have to make room for knots to be accessed through the back (for storage of planes). I made scribe lines and worked a bevel by hand with a smoother and a block plane. If I planed the bevel to the point that it would fit in the groove all the way I would have lost too much thickness, so I made small rabbet with my plow plane. Despite the deep scribe line I left, I got all this stringy crap coming off the back of the joint. I could have left it, this being the back of the cabinet, but I had an idea. I set my marking gauge to the depth of the worst of the tear-out and used my tool to shave away a nice clean edge.






A nice fit…happy shavings.


Aside, I almost always capitalize the names of wood that I am working with. I think of them as people…I'm strange, deal with it..
You're not strange, you're a wood worker!
 

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Glenn Drake saves the day...twice.

I am currently building a small shelf out of Alder and some mystery white wood to house some of my finer tools so that I do not have to go into my larger cabinet to get them all the time. This is part of a larger initiative to keep my sharp tools sharp and accessible, as someone who only uses hand tools most of the time this is about as critical to my work-flow as paying the power bill before someone fires up their table saw. Roughly six hours got me to this point.


I really did not take any picture up to this point because my plan was to finish the project in about 8 hours and taking pictures slows me down (I am a bit of a camera nut), Working with a stolen 15 minutes here and there I was able to get the back panel fitted, which brings us to the reason for this post (but first a picture of the chaos…er work on my bench)


The back panel is made out of the aforementioned white mystery wood. It's not poplar as I first though. It's soft straight grained, smells awful, and is an absolute mystery to plane. It tears out in patches for no apparent reason, when I take a fine cut the result is crap, when I take a rough cut that would leave other woods pockmarked…glassy smooth?
?
One problem came from this wood and one from limitation of my tools.

I had already plowed the groove to receive the back panel using my Stanley 45 (shelves) and used my 1/4 chisel for the sides since it was a stop cut. Next came cutting the opposite sides of the joint into the back panel. The sides were simple scribe lines saw cuts, chisel a bit for clean up, done. The top and bottom is where I ran into trouble. I only own a 1/4 inch blade for my Stanley, and the rabbet that I needed to create was just a bit to deep for that. I did not feel confident that I could make two cuts accurately as I would eliminate my registration surface with the first cut, I ended up coming up with a faster way. I set my plane to cut to depth on the farthest right side of the joint (establishing the depth and side of the joint).


I then made a scribe line to the same depth as the plow with my marking gauge (a very deep scribe line using the A2 tool steel blade.).At this point I was able to push the extra piece into the joint and SNAP, right to the scribe line. A little work with a router plane cleaned up any inconsistency.




The bottom of the panel is a bit more complex since I have to make room for knots to be accessed through the back (for storage of planes). I made scribe lines and worked a bevel by hand with a smoother and a block plane. If I planed the bevel to the point that it would fit in the groove all the way I would have lost too much thickness, so I made small rabbet with my plow plane. Despite the deep scribe line I left, I got all this stringy crap coming off the back of the joint. I could have left it, this being the back of the cabinet, but I had an idea. I set my marking gauge to the depth of the worst of the tear-out and used my tool to shave away a nice clean edge.






A nice fit…happy shavings.


Aside, I almost always capitalize the names of wood that I am working with. I think of them as people…I'm strange, deal with it..
Great Ryan, it is a pleasure to read your new blog, thanks for sharing. A real project, keep your good work up !
 

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Glenn Drake saves the day...twice.

I am currently building a small shelf out of Alder and some mystery white wood to house some of my finer tools so that I do not have to go into my larger cabinet to get them all the time. This is part of a larger initiative to keep my sharp tools sharp and accessible, as someone who only uses hand tools most of the time this is about as critical to my work-flow as paying the power bill before someone fires up their table saw. Roughly six hours got me to this point.


I really did not take any picture up to this point because my plan was to finish the project in about 8 hours and taking pictures slows me down (I am a bit of a camera nut), Working with a stolen 15 minutes here and there I was able to get the back panel fitted, which brings us to the reason for this post (but first a picture of the chaos…er work on my bench)


The back panel is made out of the aforementioned white mystery wood. It's not poplar as I first though. It's soft straight grained, smells awful, and is an absolute mystery to plane. It tears out in patches for no apparent reason, when I take a fine cut the result is crap, when I take a rough cut that would leave other woods pockmarked…glassy smooth?
?
One problem came from this wood and one from limitation of my tools.

I had already plowed the groove to receive the back panel using my Stanley 45 (shelves) and used my 1/4 chisel for the sides since it was a stop cut. Next came cutting the opposite sides of the joint into the back panel. The sides were simple scribe lines saw cuts, chisel a bit for clean up, done. The top and bottom is where I ran into trouble. I only own a 1/4 inch blade for my Stanley, and the rabbet that I needed to create was just a bit to deep for that. I did not feel confident that I could make two cuts accurately as I would eliminate my registration surface with the first cut, I ended up coming up with a faster way. I set my plane to cut to depth on the farthest right side of the joint (establishing the depth and side of the joint).


I then made a scribe line to the same depth as the plow with my marking gauge (a very deep scribe line using the A2 tool steel blade.).At this point I was able to push the extra piece into the joint and SNAP, right to the scribe line. A little work with a router plane cleaned up any inconsistency.




The bottom of the panel is a bit more complex since I have to make room for knots to be accessed through the back (for storage of planes). I made scribe lines and worked a bevel by hand with a smoother and a block plane. If I planed the bevel to the point that it would fit in the groove all the way I would have lost too much thickness, so I made small rabbet with my plow plane. Despite the deep scribe line I left, I got all this stringy crap coming off the back of the joint. I could have left it, this being the back of the cabinet, but I had an idea. I set my marking gauge to the depth of the worst of the tear-out and used my tool to shave away a nice clean edge.






A nice fit…happy shavings.


Aside, I almost always capitalize the names of wood that I am working with. I think of them as people…I'm strange, deal with it..
Great stuff, Ryan. I've got some bathroom shelves to get started on this week. I capitalize most nouns on accident, it's a German thing. They capitalize all nouns. I am not German but I took a lot of it in school and I think I wrote more academic papers for German classes than I did for Economics, which was my major.
 

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Glenn Drake saves the day...twice.

I am currently building a small shelf out of Alder and some mystery white wood to house some of my finer tools so that I do not have to go into my larger cabinet to get them all the time. This is part of a larger initiative to keep my sharp tools sharp and accessible, as someone who only uses hand tools most of the time this is about as critical to my work-flow as paying the power bill before someone fires up their table saw. Roughly six hours got me to this point.


I really did not take any picture up to this point because my plan was to finish the project in about 8 hours and taking pictures slows me down (I am a bit of a camera nut), Working with a stolen 15 minutes here and there I was able to get the back panel fitted, which brings us to the reason for this post (but first a picture of the chaos…er work on my bench)


The back panel is made out of the aforementioned white mystery wood. It's not poplar as I first though. It's soft straight grained, smells awful, and is an absolute mystery to plane. It tears out in patches for no apparent reason, when I take a fine cut the result is crap, when I take a rough cut that would leave other woods pockmarked…glassy smooth?
?
One problem came from this wood and one from limitation of my tools.

I had already plowed the groove to receive the back panel using my Stanley 45 (shelves) and used my 1/4 chisel for the sides since it was a stop cut. Next came cutting the opposite sides of the joint into the back panel. The sides were simple scribe lines saw cuts, chisel a bit for clean up, done. The top and bottom is where I ran into trouble. I only own a 1/4 inch blade for my Stanley, and the rabbet that I needed to create was just a bit to deep for that. I did not feel confident that I could make two cuts accurately as I would eliminate my registration surface with the first cut, I ended up coming up with a faster way. I set my plane to cut to depth on the farthest right side of the joint (establishing the depth and side of the joint).


I then made a scribe line to the same depth as the plow with my marking gauge (a very deep scribe line using the A2 tool steel blade.).At this point I was able to push the extra piece into the joint and SNAP, right to the scribe line. A little work with a router plane cleaned up any inconsistency.




The bottom of the panel is a bit more complex since I have to make room for knots to be accessed through the back (for storage of planes). I made scribe lines and worked a bevel by hand with a smoother and a block plane. If I planed the bevel to the point that it would fit in the groove all the way I would have lost too much thickness, so I made small rabbet with my plow plane. Despite the deep scribe line I left, I got all this stringy crap coming off the back of the joint. I could have left it, this being the back of the cabinet, but I had an idea. I set my marking gauge to the depth of the worst of the tear-out and used my tool to shave away a nice clean edge.






A nice fit…happy shavings.


Aside, I almost always capitalize the names of wood that I am working with. I think of them as people…I'm strange, deal with it..
Ryan,

THat's a cool project. I love how it turned out. I've read it a few times and still don't get how you came up with the title: Glen Drake saves the Day.

Can you explain a bit?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Glenn Drake saves the day...twice.

I am currently building a small shelf out of Alder and some mystery white wood to house some of my finer tools so that I do not have to go into my larger cabinet to get them all the time. This is part of a larger initiative to keep my sharp tools sharp and accessible, as someone who only uses hand tools most of the time this is about as critical to my work-flow as paying the power bill before someone fires up their table saw. Roughly six hours got me to this point.


I really did not take any picture up to this point because my plan was to finish the project in about 8 hours and taking pictures slows me down (I am a bit of a camera nut), Working with a stolen 15 minutes here and there I was able to get the back panel fitted, which brings us to the reason for this post (but first a picture of the chaos…er work on my bench)


The back panel is made out of the aforementioned white mystery wood. It's not poplar as I first though. It's soft straight grained, smells awful, and is an absolute mystery to plane. It tears out in patches for no apparent reason, when I take a fine cut the result is crap, when I take a rough cut that would leave other woods pockmarked…glassy smooth?
?
One problem came from this wood and one from limitation of my tools.

I had already plowed the groove to receive the back panel using my Stanley 45 (shelves) and used my 1/4 chisel for the sides since it was a stop cut. Next came cutting the opposite sides of the joint into the back panel. The sides were simple scribe lines saw cuts, chisel a bit for clean up, done. The top and bottom is where I ran into trouble. I only own a 1/4 inch blade for my Stanley, and the rabbet that I needed to create was just a bit to deep for that. I did not feel confident that I could make two cuts accurately as I would eliminate my registration surface with the first cut, I ended up coming up with a faster way. I set my plane to cut to depth on the farthest right side of the joint (establishing the depth and side of the joint).


I then made a scribe line to the same depth as the plow with my marking gauge (a very deep scribe line using the A2 tool steel blade.).At this point I was able to push the extra piece into the joint and SNAP, right to the scribe line. A little work with a router plane cleaned up any inconsistency.




The bottom of the panel is a bit more complex since I have to make room for knots to be accessed through the back (for storage of planes). I made scribe lines and worked a bevel by hand with a smoother and a block plane. If I planed the bevel to the point that it would fit in the groove all the way I would have lost too much thickness, so I made small rabbet with my plow plane. Despite the deep scribe line I left, I got all this stringy crap coming off the back of the joint. I could have left it, this being the back of the cabinet, but I had an idea. I set my marking gauge to the depth of the worst of the tear-out and used my tool to shave away a nice clean edge.






A nice fit…happy shavings.


Aside, I almost always capitalize the names of wood that I am working with. I think of them as people…I'm strange, deal with it..
The marking gauge I use. (and love.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Glenn Drake saves the day...twice.

I am currently building a small shelf out of Alder and some mystery white wood to house some of my finer tools so that I do not have to go into my larger cabinet to get them all the time. This is part of a larger initiative to keep my sharp tools sharp and accessible, as someone who only uses hand tools most of the time this is about as critical to my work-flow as paying the power bill before someone fires up their table saw. Roughly six hours got me to this point.


I really did not take any picture up to this point because my plan was to finish the project in about 8 hours and taking pictures slows me down (I am a bit of a camera nut), Working with a stolen 15 minutes here and there I was able to get the back panel fitted, which brings us to the reason for this post (but first a picture of the chaos…er work on my bench)


The back panel is made out of the aforementioned white mystery wood. It's not poplar as I first though. It's soft straight grained, smells awful, and is an absolute mystery to plane. It tears out in patches for no apparent reason, when I take a fine cut the result is crap, when I take a rough cut that would leave other woods pockmarked…glassy smooth?
?
One problem came from this wood and one from limitation of my tools.

I had already plowed the groove to receive the back panel using my Stanley 45 (shelves) and used my 1/4 chisel for the sides since it was a stop cut. Next came cutting the opposite sides of the joint into the back panel. The sides were simple scribe lines saw cuts, chisel a bit for clean up, done. The top and bottom is where I ran into trouble. I only own a 1/4 inch blade for my Stanley, and the rabbet that I needed to create was just a bit to deep for that. I did not feel confident that I could make two cuts accurately as I would eliminate my registration surface with the first cut, I ended up coming up with a faster way. I set my plane to cut to depth on the farthest right side of the joint (establishing the depth and side of the joint).


I then made a scribe line to the same depth as the plow with my marking gauge (a very deep scribe line using the A2 tool steel blade.).At this point I was able to push the extra piece into the joint and SNAP, right to the scribe line. A little work with a router plane cleaned up any inconsistency.




The bottom of the panel is a bit more complex since I have to make room for knots to be accessed through the back (for storage of planes). I made scribe lines and worked a bevel by hand with a smoother and a block plane. If I planed the bevel to the point that it would fit in the groove all the way I would have lost too much thickness, so I made small rabbet with my plow plane. Despite the deep scribe line I left, I got all this stringy crap coming off the back of the joint. I could have left it, this being the back of the cabinet, but I had an idea. I set my marking gauge to the depth of the worst of the tear-out and used my tool to shave away a nice clean edge.






A nice fit…happy shavings.


Aside, I almost always capitalize the names of wood that I am working with. I think of them as people…I'm strange, deal with it..
Here, this is the second top of the line tool I purchased (the Titemark). I can say every time I use it I thing "money well spent".

http://www.glen-drake.com/

The marking gauge worked well for cut cleanup and scoring for break-off of waste, this is something that a conventional or lesser quality gauge could not have done. Good tools do what they were made to do, great tools do more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Scraper shave fun

I did not have a lot of energy by the time I got done with everything else that I had to do, so my "mini-roubo" was just a bit out of reach. I still wanted to do something, so I went to the scrap heap and found a piece of walnut large enough to split down to a more straight grained piece.

The goal here is to make a scraper shave, here are the prospective parts in there rough format the now straight grained walnut, a piece of desert ironwood (sometimes the scrap pile really pays off) the knurled screws and bolts and a piece of an old saw from a salvation army store.


we'll see what this turns into.
 

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Scraper shave fun

I did not have a lot of energy by the time I got done with everything else that I had to do, so my "mini-roubo" was just a bit out of reach. I still wanted to do something, so I went to the scrap heap and found a piece of walnut large enough to split down to a more straight grained piece.

The goal here is to make a scraper shave, here are the prospective parts in there rough format the now straight grained walnut, a piece of desert ironwood (sometimes the scrap pile really pays off) the knurled screws and bolts and a piece of an old saw from a salvation army store.


we'll see what this turns into.
This is one of those shopmade projects very funny and useful later on, It looks attractive at first sight
 

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Scraper shave fun

I did not have a lot of energy by the time I got done with everything else that I had to do, so my "mini-roubo" was just a bit out of reach. I still wanted to do something, so I went to the scrap heap and found a piece of walnut large enough to split down to a more straight grained piece.

The goal here is to make a scraper shave, here are the prospective parts in there rough format the now straight grained walnut, a piece of desert ironwood (sometimes the scrap pile really pays off) the knurled screws and bolts and a piece of an old saw from a salvation army store.


we'll see what this turns into.
Looking good.
On my table is a bunch of brass bolts and knobs, and sketches for some shave layouts…
We are on the same travel now.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Now serving 38

I was just so pleased to see how many tools I was able to fit on this $13 piece of 3/4 plywood. Beats the hell out of pegboard.



Thanks for looking.
 

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I was just so pleased to see how many tools I was able to fit on this $13 piece of 3/4 plywood. Beats the hell out of pegboard.



Thanks for looking.
I'm with Dennis - push yourself for 22 more at least! :) Nice work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Now serving 38

I was just so pleased to see how many tools I was able to fit on this $13 piece of 3/4 plywood. Beats the hell out of pegboard.



Thanks for looking.
I do have other tools that I would like to throw on there but I may have to tweak the chisel storage as it currently used too much headroom.

Thanks guys….you put me back to work.
 

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Now serving 38

I was just so pleased to see how many tools I was able to fit on this $13 piece of 3/4 plywood. Beats the hell out of pegboard.



Thanks for looking.
I love it!
Yes tools for wood should be displayed on wood.
My on my workshop wall I have metal pegboards and hate them, so I can't wait to change this!
Beautiful wood plane in the top right there.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Now serving 38

I was just so pleased to see how many tools I was able to fit on this $13 piece of 3/4 plywood. Beats the hell out of pegboard.



Thanks for looking.
Thanks Mads, that made me smile. I love wrapping my hands around that plane. I have a piece of wenge that I really need to get working on for my jointer. I scored some Cocobolo for a song today and now I will have a VERY long wearing sole for it…but where will I put it? (starts drawing a cabinet)
 

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I was just so pleased to see how many tools I was able to fit on this $13 piece of 3/4 plywood. Beats the hell out of pegboard.



Thanks for looking.
Wenge is one of my favorite woods.
Yes a cabinet would look good also.
The plane looks like it's saying 'hold me'!
Mads
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
WWII Era German Handplane

Have you ever wanted something for a solid year without pulling the trigger? Day before yesterday I had to make a quick run into town with my wife and I finally decided this had to come home with me.

This tool was loved. All I did before shooting this was set the wedge. Sharpening an old tool before sale is unheard of in this neck of the woods…but such a treat to come across. I made a point to write a note to the seller and let him know it's going to a home where it's going to get used.

http://www.facebook.com/v/10150486265475229

Not quite used to the hammer adjust for this plane…there is a courting period so to speak where you and the tool learn each others story. Looking forward to getting to know this one.
 
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