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Greasy Business (wasn't mine, but it is NOW)

Did not post this as a project although it IS a woodworking finished project - yet not made by me.

I got a little package in the mail yesterday, and inside was awaiting quietly this little gem:
Wood Rectangle Beige Wood stain Tints and shades


made and sent to me by none other than LJ blackcherry

Thank you very much Wilson! This will be allocated to my tool cabinet and shall be put to use often. My main uses for this would be to wax my handplanes metal bodies and soles after use to keep it from developing surface rust (used T9 and wd40 till now, but this would be better) and make them smoother (less friction) during use. Also for driving screws (makes the screw drive smoother and easier), and similar applications.

the substance inside is beeswax mixed with mineral oil, I was really surprised at the stiffness of it as I thought it would be softer. It seems that the hardness of it will make it easier to use compared to a more pasty and gooey substance.

So perhaps not officially a cult member, but I definitely can say 'I got me one' and more importantly, have a very valuable shop accessory.

Thanks for reading,
Peace
Really nice work on the box and great heart on the gifting of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #302 ·
I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
I hope that you get your planer working again soon. Based on your experience, if I ever need to replace a sprocket, I will buy a few of them.

Are the sprockets metal or plastic?
 

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Discussion Starter · #304 ·
I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
these are metal. it seems like they are cast metal of some sort, easily broken if put under stress.
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Now THAT's a bag of downers :-(

Hoping the third time's a charm !
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Good luck on the re-rebuild
 

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Discussion Starter · #307 ·
I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Thanks. hopefully next time will be the last.

shopguryl - thanks!. that's exactly what I plan to do to make sure nothing else might be lurking in the dark - spin it by hand, and check it closely before I power it up. then have a couple extra sprockets at hand if it does pop up again. the idea that maybe both sprockets got hit at the same time, while one was just waiting to fully crack makes sense. we'll see how it goes next week when the parts arrive.
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Hi Sharon;

Some days it bees that way, right?

At least now you know.

Lee
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
They are made with soft metal so they break instead of completely ruining the planer. It sucks but the alternative is worse.

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL
 

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Discussion Starter · #310 ·
I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Thanks Erwin - I agree! I would machine a new sprocket of better material, but at the risk of messing a more substantial component in the planer - I'd rather get the proper soft metal replacement part that would break first.
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
I had a nice laugh with your words, spoken like a parent trying to feed the child. If the gears were installed incorrectly when the machine was built, and it was possible to do that, then I would call that 1) a design flaw and 2) a failure of quality control.

Anyway, good luck with it!

Mark
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
ARGH! All of my pain is returning. Yours is a sprocket. Mine was a bearing. I also ruined my first replacement and decided to buy a few as backups after that. I feel your pain. Planers are crap. Best of luck!
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Sharon,
You are fortunate to have parts available so close to home.
I'm sure you'll get to the bottom of this one… you always do!!
Ellen
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Yuck, I regard my 735 almost with a sense of awe everytime a rough board goes in and a beautiful grained piece of wood emerges from the other side!!

I hope it was just the sprocket that failed and not failed bearing stress related, but have to wait and see.

However, once you get it fixed up you will have that sense of pride in doing it yourself and having learned about the mechanics of your planer. Sounds nice to say anyway, sympathy I guess for one that has to go through the agony of a downed piece of equipment. ;)

Thanks for sharing with the pics as a lot of us 735 owners can learn from this.
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Look real hard for the broken piece. It didn't vaporize. That may be binding up the works.
 

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I got it, I got it, I got it.... I ain't got it - fixing the DW735 planer rollers

As mentioned in a previous post, I was in the midst of planing quite a bit of hard maple, when my planer decided it was not hungry anymore, and would not feed the lumber under any circumstance - I tried the "here comes an airplane"... no go. I tried the "I'll get you ice cream if you finish all the lumber" - nope. I tried "I'll tell mama you didn't finish your wood" - nada.

So I decided to play doctor and open it up and see what's up. no, it was never a fantasy of mine, but I do like to fix my own things (as long as it's within my capacity to do so).

The roller mechanism is fairly simple. 2 rods that the rollers are mounted on, 1 rod (front) is being driven by the cutterhead via a gear mechanism that reduces the RPMs (and integrates with the speed selection switch). Then, the front rod is driving the back rod by means of 2 sprockets and a chain between them. real simple.

To get to the roller mechanism, you use the supplied wrench and remove 3 set screws:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Gas Machine tool


the entire side cover comes off to reveal the mechanism where I found the front sprocket broken in half:

Musical instrument Jewellery Art Metal Font


Actually, I only found half of the sprocket - I have no idea what happened to the 2nd half, which made me wonder if it even broke recently or before I got the planer. Regardless, I ordered a replacement part for $3 from a local dewalt service center. real nice guys in Billerica, MA.

Here you can see the half sprocket with it's replacement part:

Font Handwriting Fashion accessory Transparency Packing materials


it was just a matter of putting everything back again (with the new part obviously) and call it a day. mind you -the sprocket has a lip on 1 side, and should be installed with the lip facing inside (towards the planer) - for over excitement I installed it reversed - yup, you can probably imagine where this is heading….

So, I installed everything back together - except for the cover, and turned the planer on - lo and behold, the planer is running, and the rollers are moving ! YEAH! good stuff right there….

1….

2…

SNAP!

now the other sprocket broke in half :( I have a strong feeling it's because the sprockets were each installed opposite (one with lip inwards, one with lip outwards) but since the other sprocket broke and fell out I can't guarantee this. the other alternative which I really hope is not the reason is that there might be something else that was causing the sprocket to break.

So, back to ordering another sprocket (I'll get a few just in case as backup).

This is theoretically how you'd fix the rollers, although you may want to pay more attention to which way the sprockets are put in so that you'll actually be fixing it and be done with it. in my case - planer is still out of commission. I ended up hand planing/thicknessing the rest of the lumber for the cutting board I'm working on. not hard, but just takes more focus as you have to pay attention to flatness and thickness per board manually rather than just shoving all boards into the planer and worrying not.

On the other hand - I had success fixing my Lathe. Since it's non woodworking related, I started my own blog for that, you are all welcome to check it out as it's focused on machining and metal/solid material work. you can read it HERE
Those sprockets are about half the thickness of the ones on my Jet!

The second sprocket may have broken at the same time as the first! (I replaced the ones on my Jet when I was planing some rough Incense Ceder siding - it ran 3/4" to 1 1/4" and I didn't check to make sure if I had it set to the max thickness! Mine quit before I could start planing another board)

It may have broken right when it quit working the second time!
All the strain/pressure - however normal, will take out the weakest part! (Wear and tear or oxidation of the plastic, whatever.)

Either way you have done the maintenance and replaced worn parts so it should be good for a while! (Unless you also needed to replace any bushings or bearings!)
I believe this is the first time I have posted on one of yours PurpLev! I just wanted you to know I feel for you and have been there.

NOTE!

Any critique perceived is from my experiences and wanting others to be able to avoid my mistakes. (I had my planer apart 5 times in one week AND ended up ordering spares to keep on hand!)
That Little Jet planed an estimated 50 lineal feet before I had to replace a second set of gears AND the feed roller bushings! (I should have replaced them along with the first set of gears!)

After that I ran an estimated 5K lineal feet without a problem. (It is probably time for another set soon?)
OH WELL, such is Woodworking! :)~
 

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Discussion Starter · #317 ·
Sharpening Station

When I started working with bladed tools (chisels/planes/etc) I wanted a sharpening system that was on the cheap, small and storable and versatile. I chose to start with the scary sharp, and used sand papers from 100grit (rough shaping and cleaning nicked blades) to 2500 for final honing and green compound for touch ups. I added the Veritas MK-II honing guide and was using it for reshaping/resestting blades and honing them through the grits.

While this method worked for the time I wanted something that was faster, and I wanted a system that would allow me to free myself from jigs and go freehand. Everything that I read suggested that hollow grinding was the way to accomplish that. A coincidence find on CL of a sheppach slow wet grinder some research to learn more about it and it's acceptance among users and I followed along with a new setup. Since it's a slow grinder I am not sure there is much benefit time wise as compared to scary-sharp or stones (difference between the later 2 is mostly the material of choice), but there is definitely an improvement in effort when running a batch of blades through it, and setup time is faster as well. The real benefit though is that it is creating a hollow grind on the bevel which when you then place the bevel on a flat surface simulates 2 feet (back of bevel, and front edge) that the bevel rests on which makes it easier to register the angle of the bevel on honing media and makes it more stable to run it across it for periodical honing and touch ups without the need to go back to the grinder AND you can do that freehand without much fuss.

I know some people like to touch up blades on extra fine stones (8000+) after using the wet sharpener, but I personally find that using the buffing wheel with the buffing paste leaves the best surface and mirror shine I could ever achieve - more so than using 12,000 sand paper on granite or green compound paste on MDF. I would like to try the diamond paste some suppliers offer at some point mostly for curiosity since my edges are as sharp as I could ask them to be.

I never had any issues with the scary sharp method and was getting good results with it, but I find that with the wet grinder I can get better results with less effort and then have a green compound block of MDF at the workbench I could touch them up with from time to time so it works very well for me.

The final setup (see picture):
1. Granite slab with sand papers and a set of diamond stones for lapping soles and backs of blades flat from rough to mirror finish

2. Variable Speed double grinder- to take off ALOT of material FAST. I use this mainly for 2 reasons. mainly for metal toolings, but also to dress up broken.chipped blades that would otherwise take forever on the wet grinder and also eat up too much of the wet grinder softer wheel

3. wet slow grinder for dressing up the bevels on cutting tools and honing/buffing them to a mirror finish (final)

I have it in the basement as this way I can work on it late nights as it has low noise levels, is warmer than the garage, and easier access to water and cleaning up afterwards, but this could just as well be done in the shop, as most of this can also be stored away and pulled out when needed (I mostly only do this when I get a new tool, or after a while when I need to reestablish an edge. not so much constant use)

Machine tool Lathe Gas Machine Engineering


Maybe this can give some folks ideas, or simplify the "sharpening scare" some might have. Bottom line and as many have said before me and many will say after - there are many methods to get sharp tools, and all are good. it all boils down to what works for each one. choose one, choose many and see which works best for you and stick to it.

Thanks for reading,
Peace.
 

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Sharpening Station

When I started working with bladed tools (chisels/planes/etc) I wanted a sharpening system that was on the cheap, small and storable and versatile. I chose to start with the scary sharp, and used sand papers from 100grit (rough shaping and cleaning nicked blades) to 2500 for final honing and green compound for touch ups. I added the Veritas MK-II honing guide and was using it for reshaping/resestting blades and honing them through the grits.

While this method worked for the time I wanted something that was faster, and I wanted a system that would allow me to free myself from jigs and go freehand. Everything that I read suggested that hollow grinding was the way to accomplish that. A coincidence find on CL of a sheppach slow wet grinder some research to learn more about it and it's acceptance among users and I followed along with a new setup. Since it's a slow grinder I am not sure there is much benefit time wise as compared to scary-sharp or stones (difference between the later 2 is mostly the material of choice), but there is definitely an improvement in effort when running a batch of blades through it, and setup time is faster as well. The real benefit though is that it is creating a hollow grind on the bevel which when you then place the bevel on a flat surface simulates 2 feet (back of bevel, and front edge) that the bevel rests on which makes it easier to register the angle of the bevel on honing media and makes it more stable to run it across it for periodical honing and touch ups without the need to go back to the grinder AND you can do that freehand without much fuss.

I know some people like to touch up blades on extra fine stones (8000+) after using the wet sharpener, but I personally find that using the buffing wheel with the buffing paste leaves the best surface and mirror shine I could ever achieve - more so than using 12,000 sand paper on granite or green compound paste on MDF. I would like to try the diamond paste some suppliers offer at some point mostly for curiosity since my edges are as sharp as I could ask them to be.

I never had any issues with the scary sharp method and was getting good results with it, but I find that with the wet grinder I can get better results with less effort and then have a green compound block of MDF at the workbench I could touch them up with from time to time so it works very well for me.

The final setup (see picture):
1. Granite slab with sand papers and a set of diamond stones for lapping soles and backs of blades flat from rough to mirror finish

2. Variable Speed double grinder- to take off ALOT of material FAST. I use this mainly for 2 reasons. mainly for metal toolings, but also to dress up broken.chipped blades that would otherwise take forever on the wet grinder and also eat up too much of the wet grinder softer wheel

3. wet slow grinder for dressing up the bevels on cutting tools and honing/buffing them to a mirror finish (final)

I have it in the basement as this way I can work on it late nights as it has low noise levels, is warmer than the garage, and easier access to water and cleaning up afterwards, but this could just as well be done in the shop, as most of this can also be stored away and pulled out when needed (I mostly only do this when I get a new tool, or after a while when I need to reestablish an edge. not so much constant use)

Machine tool Lathe Gas Machine Engineering


Maybe this can give some folks ideas, or simplify the "sharpening scare" some might have. Bottom line and as many have said before me and many will say after - there are many methods to get sharp tools, and all are good. it all boils down to what works for each one. choose one, choose many and see which works best for you and stick to it.

Thanks for reading,
Peace.
Thanks for posting this, Sharon. I have been using a Worksharp 3000 for all of my chisels and plane irons. It's a really great tool for the standard bevel edge chisels and smaller plane irons. For the larger plane irons, mortise chisels, and skew chisels, though, I've been having some trouble getting the results I'm after.

Given that I keep all my stones and tools in an unheated garage, wet sharpening is out of the question. I've considered going to diamond stones and a Rob Cosman honing guide. I've read that after using that guide for a while you get used to the position of the blade in your fingers and you won't need it. It's like training wheels, I guess. Did you consider diamond stones?
 

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Sharpening Station

When I started working with bladed tools (chisels/planes/etc) I wanted a sharpening system that was on the cheap, small and storable and versatile. I chose to start with the scary sharp, and used sand papers from 100grit (rough shaping and cleaning nicked blades) to 2500 for final honing and green compound for touch ups. I added the Veritas MK-II honing guide and was using it for reshaping/resestting blades and honing them through the grits.

While this method worked for the time I wanted something that was faster, and I wanted a system that would allow me to free myself from jigs and go freehand. Everything that I read suggested that hollow grinding was the way to accomplish that. A coincidence find on CL of a sheppach slow wet grinder some research to learn more about it and it's acceptance among users and I followed along with a new setup. Since it's a slow grinder I am not sure there is much benefit time wise as compared to scary-sharp or stones (difference between the later 2 is mostly the material of choice), but there is definitely an improvement in effort when running a batch of blades through it, and setup time is faster as well. The real benefit though is that it is creating a hollow grind on the bevel which when you then place the bevel on a flat surface simulates 2 feet (back of bevel, and front edge) that the bevel rests on which makes it easier to register the angle of the bevel on honing media and makes it more stable to run it across it for periodical honing and touch ups without the need to go back to the grinder AND you can do that freehand without much fuss.

I know some people like to touch up blades on extra fine stones (8000+) after using the wet sharpener, but I personally find that using the buffing wheel with the buffing paste leaves the best surface and mirror shine I could ever achieve - more so than using 12,000 sand paper on granite or green compound paste on MDF. I would like to try the diamond paste some suppliers offer at some point mostly for curiosity since my edges are as sharp as I could ask them to be.

I never had any issues with the scary sharp method and was getting good results with it, but I find that with the wet grinder I can get better results with less effort and then have a green compound block of MDF at the workbench I could touch them up with from time to time so it works very well for me.

The final setup (see picture):
1. Granite slab with sand papers and a set of diamond stones for lapping soles and backs of blades flat from rough to mirror finish

2. Variable Speed double grinder- to take off ALOT of material FAST. I use this mainly for 2 reasons. mainly for metal toolings, but also to dress up broken.chipped blades that would otherwise take forever on the wet grinder and also eat up too much of the wet grinder softer wheel

3. wet slow grinder for dressing up the bevels on cutting tools and honing/buffing them to a mirror finish (final)

I have it in the basement as this way I can work on it late nights as it has low noise levels, is warmer than the garage, and easier access to water and cleaning up afterwards, but this could just as well be done in the shop, as most of this can also be stored away and pulled out when needed (I mostly only do this when I get a new tool, or after a while when I need to reestablish an edge. not so much constant use)

Machine tool Lathe Gas Machine Engineering


Maybe this can give some folks ideas, or simplify the "sharpening scare" some might have. Bottom line and as many have said before me and many will say after - there are many methods to get sharp tools, and all are good. it all boils down to what works for each one. choose one, choose many and see which works best for you and stick to it.

Thanks for reading,
Peace.
Sharon thank you for posting . I have a similar set up and it works well for me too.
I bought a Worksharp 3000 a while ago, I used it once and then never touched it again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #320 ·
Sharpening Station

When I started working with bladed tools (chisels/planes/etc) I wanted a sharpening system that was on the cheap, small and storable and versatile. I chose to start with the scary sharp, and used sand papers from 100grit (rough shaping and cleaning nicked blades) to 2500 for final honing and green compound for touch ups. I added the Veritas MK-II honing guide and was using it for reshaping/resestting blades and honing them through the grits.

While this method worked for the time I wanted something that was faster, and I wanted a system that would allow me to free myself from jigs and go freehand. Everything that I read suggested that hollow grinding was the way to accomplish that. A coincidence find on CL of a sheppach slow wet grinder some research to learn more about it and it's acceptance among users and I followed along with a new setup. Since it's a slow grinder I am not sure there is much benefit time wise as compared to scary-sharp or stones (difference between the later 2 is mostly the material of choice), but there is definitely an improvement in effort when running a batch of blades through it, and setup time is faster as well. The real benefit though is that it is creating a hollow grind on the bevel which when you then place the bevel on a flat surface simulates 2 feet (back of bevel, and front edge) that the bevel rests on which makes it easier to register the angle of the bevel on honing media and makes it more stable to run it across it for periodical honing and touch ups without the need to go back to the grinder AND you can do that freehand without much fuss.

I know some people like to touch up blades on extra fine stones (8000+) after using the wet sharpener, but I personally find that using the buffing wheel with the buffing paste leaves the best surface and mirror shine I could ever achieve - more so than using 12,000 sand paper on granite or green compound paste on MDF. I would like to try the diamond paste some suppliers offer at some point mostly for curiosity since my edges are as sharp as I could ask them to be.

I never had any issues with the scary sharp method and was getting good results with it, but I find that with the wet grinder I can get better results with less effort and then have a green compound block of MDF at the workbench I could touch them up with from time to time so it works very well for me.

The final setup (see picture):
1. Granite slab with sand papers and a set of diamond stones for lapping soles and backs of blades flat from rough to mirror finish

2. Variable Speed double grinder- to take off ALOT of material FAST. I use this mainly for 2 reasons. mainly for metal toolings, but also to dress up broken.chipped blades that would otherwise take forever on the wet grinder and also eat up too much of the wet grinder softer wheel

3. wet slow grinder for dressing up the bevels on cutting tools and honing/buffing them to a mirror finish (final)

I have it in the basement as this way I can work on it late nights as it has low noise levels, is warmer than the garage, and easier access to water and cleaning up afterwards, but this could just as well be done in the shop, as most of this can also be stored away and pulled out when needed (I mostly only do this when I get a new tool, or after a while when I need to reestablish an edge. not so much constant use)

Machine tool Lathe Gas Machine Engineering


Maybe this can give some folks ideas, or simplify the "sharpening scare" some might have. Bottom line and as many have said before me and many will say after - there are many methods to get sharp tools, and all are good. it all boils down to what works for each one. choose one, choose many and see which works best for you and stick to it.

Thanks for reading,
Peace.
Cory, I didn't think of blade thickness as an issue since my setup can handle anything of any size and shape, but this is something to consider as well. As for diamond stones if you'll look at the pic and at #1 in my list I have a set of diamond stones. even the finest of them is still somewhat 'rough' and blades will still need to be honed on something with a finer grit. it does remove material pretty well though.

As for freehand sharpening - once you 'get it' you just get it. one thing that I found helpful was avoiding a back-and-forth motion as it tends to force you to rock you hand and not keeping a straight plane on the edge you are sharpening. instead just go movements towards you (or push away from you as long as you only go one way). and hole the bevel at an angle. after that - practice practice practice.
 

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