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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Workbench

So like every other woodworker, I take pride in my shop, and always aspire to have the most convenient, flowing, accessible, productive, efficient, fun, and good looking setup I can get.

This is the story of my shop.

So one thing that I wanted for a while, but never really got the chance to setup, nor the place, was a workbench. for the longest time I've been mostly assembling on the floor, and working on foldable plastic sawhorses that have a work surface that flips on top - these work great , they are super portable, but really lack the ability to hold anything secure enough while expressing force on the piece (sawing, planning, sanding, etc) - sure they work, but it's that "If only I had a sturdier work surface" kind of thought.

So I've seen the Garrett-Wade foldable workbench that folds down to about 10" when not in use, and I was sold on the idea. I never really planned on spending $500 on a workbench, and more than that - I always wanted to build it myself, just like everything else around me. I began designing the workbench with the idea of using 2 panels of 3/4" MDF on top of one another for stability,weight, and flatness… and started putting it all together using Sketchup.

about a month ago Rockler came out with their own foldable workbench - exactly the same design, and probably from the same manufacture as the Garrett-Wade one - or it could be just me, but they look exactly the same. so apparently the concept was getting more popular. I just need to actually make it.

last week I went with my wife to a donation center where they had this 2" thick solid maple top 72"x24" - was that a special custom order for ME of what? so I quickly took it for $25 before anyone else could even say "mine". I was planning to cut off about 12" off of it's length to use as the faces for the vise which would give me even color, and identical material, and still keep me at 60" for length which is more then enough for what I need.

the final design is this:
Rectangle Table Wood Parallel Plywood


The top folds down against the wall, and takes less then 4" depth which is just perfect as I can fit my cat - AND open the door to get out of it.

right now the top is all installed on the wall, and you can see that in my workshop page, all I need now is a set of legs that will support it when it's in the horizontal position - I already used it with temporary support, and it works like a charm.
 

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The Workbench

So like every other woodworker, I take pride in my shop, and always aspire to have the most convenient, flowing, accessible, productive, efficient, fun, and good looking setup I can get.

This is the story of my shop.

So one thing that I wanted for a while, but never really got the chance to setup, nor the place, was a workbench. for the longest time I've been mostly assembling on the floor, and working on foldable plastic sawhorses that have a work surface that flips on top - these work great , they are super portable, but really lack the ability to hold anything secure enough while expressing force on the piece (sawing, planning, sanding, etc) - sure they work, but it's that "If only I had a sturdier work surface" kind of thought.

So I've seen the Garrett-Wade foldable workbench that folds down to about 10" when not in use, and I was sold on the idea. I never really planned on spending $500 on a workbench, and more than that - I always wanted to build it myself, just like everything else around me. I began designing the workbench with the idea of using 2 panels of 3/4" MDF on top of one another for stability,weight, and flatness… and started putting it all together using Sketchup.

about a month ago Rockler came out with their own foldable workbench - exactly the same design, and probably from the same manufacture as the Garrett-Wade one - or it could be just me, but they look exactly the same. so apparently the concept was getting more popular. I just need to actually make it.

last week I went with my wife to a donation center where they had this 2" thick solid maple top 72"x24" - was that a special custom order for ME of what? so I quickly took it for $25 before anyone else could even say "mine". I was planning to cut off about 12" off of it's length to use as the faces for the vise which would give me even color, and identical material, and still keep me at 60" for length which is more then enough for what I need.

the final design is this:


The top folds down against the wall, and takes less then 4" depth which is just perfect as I can fit my cat - AND open the door to get out of it.

right now the top is all installed on the wall, and you can see that in my workshop page, all I need now is a set of legs that will support it when it's in the horizontal position - I already used it with temporary support, and it works like a charm.
Looks good so far. Those leg supports need to be heavy if you plan to do any chopping and or serious planing to flatten boards. I found mine were to flimsy and I had to beef them up a bit.

Good luck with the project,
 

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The Workbench

So like every other woodworker, I take pride in my shop, and always aspire to have the most convenient, flowing, accessible, productive, efficient, fun, and good looking setup I can get.

This is the story of my shop.

So one thing that I wanted for a while, but never really got the chance to setup, nor the place, was a workbench. for the longest time I've been mostly assembling on the floor, and working on foldable plastic sawhorses that have a work surface that flips on top - these work great , they are super portable, but really lack the ability to hold anything secure enough while expressing force on the piece (sawing, planning, sanding, etc) - sure they work, but it's that "If only I had a sturdier work surface" kind of thought.

So I've seen the Garrett-Wade foldable workbench that folds down to about 10" when not in use, and I was sold on the idea. I never really planned on spending $500 on a workbench, and more than that - I always wanted to build it myself, just like everything else around me. I began designing the workbench with the idea of using 2 panels of 3/4" MDF on top of one another for stability,weight, and flatness… and started putting it all together using Sketchup.

about a month ago Rockler came out with their own foldable workbench - exactly the same design, and probably from the same manufacture as the Garrett-Wade one - or it could be just me, but they look exactly the same. so apparently the concept was getting more popular. I just need to actually make it.

last week I went with my wife to a donation center where they had this 2" thick solid maple top 72"x24" - was that a special custom order for ME of what? so I quickly took it for $25 before anyone else could even say "mine". I was planning to cut off about 12" off of it's length to use as the faces for the vise which would give me even color, and identical material, and still keep me at 60" for length which is more then enough for what I need.

the final design is this:


The top folds down against the wall, and takes less then 4" depth which is just perfect as I can fit my cat - AND open the door to get out of it.

right now the top is all installed on the wall, and you can see that in my workshop page, all I need now is a set of legs that will support it when it's in the horizontal position - I already used it with temporary support, and it works like a charm.
Are you going to ad bracing legs on the front or simply attach it to the wall? I would assume it's the former, as to do otherwise would leave your vise without adequate stability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Workbench

So like every other woodworker, I take pride in my shop, and always aspire to have the most convenient, flowing, accessible, productive, efficient, fun, and good looking setup I can get.

This is the story of my shop.

So one thing that I wanted for a while, but never really got the chance to setup, nor the place, was a workbench. for the longest time I've been mostly assembling on the floor, and working on foldable plastic sawhorses that have a work surface that flips on top - these work great , they are super portable, but really lack the ability to hold anything secure enough while expressing force on the piece (sawing, planning, sanding, etc) - sure they work, but it's that "If only I had a sturdier work surface" kind of thought.

So I've seen the Garrett-Wade foldable workbench that folds down to about 10" when not in use, and I was sold on the idea. I never really planned on spending $500 on a workbench, and more than that - I always wanted to build it myself, just like everything else around me. I began designing the workbench with the idea of using 2 panels of 3/4" MDF on top of one another for stability,weight, and flatness… and started putting it all together using Sketchup.

about a month ago Rockler came out with their own foldable workbench - exactly the same design, and probably from the same manufacture as the Garrett-Wade one - or it could be just me, but they look exactly the same. so apparently the concept was getting more popular. I just need to actually make it.

last week I went with my wife to a donation center where they had this 2" thick solid maple top 72"x24" - was that a special custom order for ME of what? so I quickly took it for $25 before anyone else could even say "mine". I was planning to cut off about 12" off of it's length to use as the faces for the vise which would give me even color, and identical material, and still keep me at 60" for length which is more then enough for what I need.

the final design is this:


The top folds down against the wall, and takes less then 4" depth which is just perfect as I can fit my cat - AND open the door to get out of it.

right now the top is all installed on the wall, and you can see that in my workshop page, all I need now is a set of legs that will support it when it's in the horizontal position - I already used it with temporary support, and it works like a charm.
sorry for the delay - I was away.

this workbench was mounted/bolted to the wall for stability and was resting on a couple of sawhorses to keep it horizontal. it was never really used extensively as we moved out of that location shortly after putting this together but for what its worth it was holding up pretty well for light/medium work.
 

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The Workbench

So like every other woodworker, I take pride in my shop, and always aspire to have the most convenient, flowing, accessible, productive, efficient, fun, and good looking setup I can get.

This is the story of my shop.

So one thing that I wanted for a while, but never really got the chance to setup, nor the place, was a workbench. for the longest time I've been mostly assembling on the floor, and working on foldable plastic sawhorses that have a work surface that flips on top - these work great , they are super portable, but really lack the ability to hold anything secure enough while expressing force on the piece (sawing, planning, sanding, etc) - sure they work, but it's that "If only I had a sturdier work surface" kind of thought.

So I've seen the Garrett-Wade foldable workbench that folds down to about 10" when not in use, and I was sold on the idea. I never really planned on spending $500 on a workbench, and more than that - I always wanted to build it myself, just like everything else around me. I began designing the workbench with the idea of using 2 panels of 3/4" MDF on top of one another for stability,weight, and flatness… and started putting it all together using Sketchup.

about a month ago Rockler came out with their own foldable workbench - exactly the same design, and probably from the same manufacture as the Garrett-Wade one - or it could be just me, but they look exactly the same. so apparently the concept was getting more popular. I just need to actually make it.

last week I went with my wife to a donation center where they had this 2" thick solid maple top 72"x24" - was that a special custom order for ME of what? so I quickly took it for $25 before anyone else could even say "mine". I was planning to cut off about 12" off of it's length to use as the faces for the vise which would give me even color, and identical material, and still keep me at 60" for length which is more then enough for what I need.

the final design is this:


The top folds down against the wall, and takes less then 4" depth which is just perfect as I can fit my cat - AND open the door to get out of it.

right now the top is all installed on the wall, and you can see that in my workshop page, all I need now is a set of legs that will support it when it's in the horizontal position - I already used it with temporary support, and it works like a charm.
Simple, functional and fuss free - perfect!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
 

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Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
Nice bench! It must be a pain having to remove everything all the time though.
 

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Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
This is a nice bench. It does save space.

Thanks for the post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
GaryK: it is a pain, every woodworking session is comprised of 3 phases … bringing everything in, actual woodworking, and cleaning + putting everything away… it's a pain in he ^$$ but if you are trying to rationalize it - cleaning up is a good thing, and 'really' has to be done anyways… so it's not MUCH of an overhead… or at least that thought makes it easier for me to do it over and over again…hehe

you do what you've gotta do, with what you've got - or you don't do it at all
 

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Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
Looking good. I like it.

Now maybe a wall mounted cabinet next to the bench to store stuff so it is quicker to pack/unpack. Workshop projects are a good way of testing and improving your skill set.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
SPalm: Thanx for the idea ;) HA. It is already on the wall - the adjacent wall! the inside of it is still under design to maximize and organize it the best I can… I'll have that blogged when it deserves to be recognized as such, but in the mean time - here is a sample:




The slots on the inside of the cabinet door are keyslots, and I can slide 1/4" #10 bolts in them and hang anything anyway I want to … will include more details photos when the time comes to present this in whole…
 

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Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
Sweet. You one clever guy!
 

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Workbench: The TOP

72"x24" 1-3/4" thick Top = $25
Groz vise = $40
Misc fasteners and hardware = $10
Building your own workbench that actually fits in a tight space that has no space for a workbench = PRICELESS




Now I just need to use scrap wood, and design legs to hold the workbench horizontally… I made it extra tall, cause every other bench I work on I get back pains from having to bend too much.

In the mean time, I just improvise and put something under to hold it straight just so that I can work on it as I have prioritized project that need to be done before I can spend the time constructing those legs…
Very practical
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Bosch 4100 TS - Zero-Clearance Inserts

I got a few questions about the zero-clearance inserts I made for my bosch table saw, so I figured I'd post the procedure here as to how I made those.

The basic Idea is to take the factory inserts and use that as a template for the router. but alas, the factory insert is just too thin at some points to be able to follow it with a trim router bit, so to tackle this issue I made an initial template out of 1/2" plywood. This first template took a bit more patience and care so that it matches the original shape perfectly. Once I got this 1/2" ply template I am set for as long as I need to make inserts as I can always use that template easily with a trim-bit.

Notice how the bottom face of the template has a groove in to allow the blade to fit in - this is merely done so that I could push the template in and check for precise sizing (the blade was slightly in the way):


Next I ripped some 1/2" MDF (I am not a big fan of working with MDF - health wise, but I do have some, and will rarely use it for jigs) to closely match the width of the ply-pattern, and cut it to length.

If you want, you can use a jigsaw and cut the MDF square to the insert size as close as you can to relieve the extra work from the router (next step).

I glued the ply-pattern on top of the MDF block, and with a trim-bit in my router table shaped the MDF to the exact insert size and shape.

Next, I used a straight-cut bit and trimmed the bottom face of the insert by 1/8" - this may vary depending on your saw,and your insert material (the saw lip - where the insert is being held - is 3/8" deep, and I was using 1/2" material). I found that raising the bit up, and holding the insert upright against the fence and protruding the bit 1/8" from the fence gave me cleaner more controlled cut (and also enabled me a deeper cut) as opposed to laying the insert flat on the table and having the bit extend 1/8" above the table.


Last step I cut a 3/4" hole in the front right side (away from the blade) to use as a finger hole to be able to pull the insert up and out of the saw (I drilled mine at a slight angle, but a straight hole would do just fine). I then placed the insert into the saw. moved the fence over the right side of the insert and locked it down. took a long board, and placed it over the left side of the insert (to the left of where the blade is) and clamped it down on both edges of the table. This will hold the insert in place. I then started the saw,and slowly raised the blade up through the insert. and Voila! - Zero-clearance inserts at almost $0 cost.

I made 3 at the same time - might as well. and labeled the bottom of the insert with the ANGLE and BLADE MODEL so that I'll know to which setting it was made for.


hope this helps…
 

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Bosch 4100 TS - Zero-Clearance Inserts

I got a few questions about the zero-clearance inserts I made for my bosch table saw, so I figured I'd post the procedure here as to how I made those.

The basic Idea is to take the factory inserts and use that as a template for the router. but alas, the factory insert is just too thin at some points to be able to follow it with a trim router bit, so to tackle this issue I made an initial template out of 1/2" plywood. This first template took a bit more patience and care so that it matches the original shape perfectly. Once I got this 1/2" ply template I am set for as long as I need to make inserts as I can always use that template easily with a trim-bit.

Notice how the bottom face of the template has a groove in to allow the blade to fit in - this is merely done so that I could push the template in and check for precise sizing (the blade was slightly in the way):


Next I ripped some 1/2" MDF (I am not a big fan of working with MDF - health wise, but I do have some, and will rarely use it for jigs) to closely match the width of the ply-pattern, and cut it to length.

If you want, you can use a jigsaw and cut the MDF square to the insert size as close as you can to relieve the extra work from the router (next step).

I glued the ply-pattern on top of the MDF block, and with a trim-bit in my router table shaped the MDF to the exact insert size and shape.

Next, I used a straight-cut bit and trimmed the bottom face of the insert by 1/8" - this may vary depending on your saw,and your insert material (the saw lip - where the insert is being held - is 3/8" deep, and I was using 1/2" material). I found that raising the bit up, and holding the insert upright against the fence and protruding the bit 1/8" from the fence gave me cleaner more controlled cut (and also enabled me a deeper cut) as opposed to laying the insert flat on the table and having the bit extend 1/8" above the table.


Last step I cut a 3/4" hole in the front right side (away from the blade) to use as a finger hole to be able to pull the insert up and out of the saw (I drilled mine at a slight angle, but a straight hole would do just fine). I then placed the insert into the saw. moved the fence over the right side of the insert and locked it down. took a long board, and placed it over the left side of the insert (to the left of where the blade is) and clamped it down on both edges of the table. This will hold the insert in place. I then started the saw,and slowly raised the blade up through the insert. and Voila! - Zero-clearance inserts at almost $0 cost.

I made 3 at the same time - might as well. and labeled the bottom of the insert with the ANGLE and BLADE MODEL so that I'll know to which setting it was made for.


hope this helps…
Great job!

Thanks for the post

Callum
 

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Bosch 4100 TS - Zero-Clearance Inserts

I got a few questions about the zero-clearance inserts I made for my bosch table saw, so I figured I'd post the procedure here as to how I made those.

The basic Idea is to take the factory inserts and use that as a template for the router. but alas, the factory insert is just too thin at some points to be able to follow it with a trim router bit, so to tackle this issue I made an initial template out of 1/2" plywood. This first template took a bit more patience and care so that it matches the original shape perfectly. Once I got this 1/2" ply template I am set for as long as I need to make inserts as I can always use that template easily with a trim-bit.

Notice how the bottom face of the template has a groove in to allow the blade to fit in - this is merely done so that I could push the template in and check for precise sizing (the blade was slightly in the way):


Next I ripped some 1/2" MDF (I am not a big fan of working with MDF - health wise, but I do have some, and will rarely use it for jigs) to closely match the width of the ply-pattern, and cut it to length.

If you want, you can use a jigsaw and cut the MDF square to the insert size as close as you can to relieve the extra work from the router (next step).

I glued the ply-pattern on top of the MDF block, and with a trim-bit in my router table shaped the MDF to the exact insert size and shape.

Next, I used a straight-cut bit and trimmed the bottom face of the insert by 1/8" - this may vary depending on your saw,and your insert material (the saw lip - where the insert is being held - is 3/8" deep, and I was using 1/2" material). I found that raising the bit up, and holding the insert upright against the fence and protruding the bit 1/8" from the fence gave me cleaner more controlled cut (and also enabled me a deeper cut) as opposed to laying the insert flat on the table and having the bit extend 1/8" above the table.


Last step I cut a 3/4" hole in the front right side (away from the blade) to use as a finger hole to be able to pull the insert up and out of the saw (I drilled mine at a slight angle, but a straight hole would do just fine). I then placed the insert into the saw. moved the fence over the right side of the insert and locked it down. took a long board, and placed it over the left side of the insert (to the left of where the blade is) and clamped it down on both edges of the table. This will hold the insert in place. I then started the saw,and slowly raised the blade up through the insert. and Voila! - Zero-clearance inserts at almost $0 cost.

I made 3 at the same time - might as well. and labeled the bottom of the insert with the ANGLE and BLADE MODEL so that I'll know to which setting it was made for.


hope this helps…
Thanks - pics always help!

Keith
 

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Bosch 4100 TS - Zero-Clearance Inserts

I got a few questions about the zero-clearance inserts I made for my bosch table saw, so I figured I'd post the procedure here as to how I made those.

The basic Idea is to take the factory inserts and use that as a template for the router. but alas, the factory insert is just too thin at some points to be able to follow it with a trim router bit, so to tackle this issue I made an initial template out of 1/2" plywood. This first template took a bit more patience and care so that it matches the original shape perfectly. Once I got this 1/2" ply template I am set for as long as I need to make inserts as I can always use that template easily with a trim-bit.

Notice how the bottom face of the template has a groove in to allow the blade to fit in - this is merely done so that I could push the template in and check for precise sizing (the blade was slightly in the way):


Next I ripped some 1/2" MDF (I am not a big fan of working with MDF - health wise, but I do have some, and will rarely use it for jigs) to closely match the width of the ply-pattern, and cut it to length.

If you want, you can use a jigsaw and cut the MDF square to the insert size as close as you can to relieve the extra work from the router (next step).

I glued the ply-pattern on top of the MDF block, and with a trim-bit in my router table shaped the MDF to the exact insert size and shape.

Next, I used a straight-cut bit and trimmed the bottom face of the insert by 1/8" - this may vary depending on your saw,and your insert material (the saw lip - where the insert is being held - is 3/8" deep, and I was using 1/2" material). I found that raising the bit up, and holding the insert upright against the fence and protruding the bit 1/8" from the fence gave me cleaner more controlled cut (and also enabled me a deeper cut) as opposed to laying the insert flat on the table and having the bit extend 1/8" above the table.


Last step I cut a 3/4" hole in the front right side (away from the blade) to use as a finger hole to be able to pull the insert up and out of the saw (I drilled mine at a slight angle, but a straight hole would do just fine). I then placed the insert into the saw. moved the fence over the right side of the insert and locked it down. took a long board, and placed it over the left side of the insert (to the left of where the blade is) and clamped it down on both edges of the table. This will hold the insert in place. I then started the saw,and slowly raised the blade up through the insert. and Voila! - Zero-clearance inserts at almost $0 cost.

I made 3 at the same time - might as well. and labeled the bottom of the insert with the ANGLE and BLADE MODEL so that I'll know to which setting it was made for.


hope this helps…
Cool! Thanks for the how-to!
 

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Bosch 4100 TS - Zero-Clearance Inserts

I got a few questions about the zero-clearance inserts I made for my bosch table saw, so I figured I'd post the procedure here as to how I made those.

The basic Idea is to take the factory inserts and use that as a template for the router. but alas, the factory insert is just too thin at some points to be able to follow it with a trim router bit, so to tackle this issue I made an initial template out of 1/2" plywood. This first template took a bit more patience and care so that it matches the original shape perfectly. Once I got this 1/2" ply template I am set for as long as I need to make inserts as I can always use that template easily with a trim-bit.

Notice how the bottom face of the template has a groove in to allow the blade to fit in - this is merely done so that I could push the template in and check for precise sizing (the blade was slightly in the way):


Next I ripped some 1/2" MDF (I am not a big fan of working with MDF - health wise, but I do have some, and will rarely use it for jigs) to closely match the width of the ply-pattern, and cut it to length.

If you want, you can use a jigsaw and cut the MDF square to the insert size as close as you can to relieve the extra work from the router (next step).

I glued the ply-pattern on top of the MDF block, and with a trim-bit in my router table shaped the MDF to the exact insert size and shape.

Next, I used a straight-cut bit and trimmed the bottom face of the insert by 1/8" - this may vary depending on your saw,and your insert material (the saw lip - where the insert is being held - is 3/8" deep, and I was using 1/2" material). I found that raising the bit up, and holding the insert upright against the fence and protruding the bit 1/8" from the fence gave me cleaner more controlled cut (and also enabled me a deeper cut) as opposed to laying the insert flat on the table and having the bit extend 1/8" above the table.


Last step I cut a 3/4" hole in the front right side (away from the blade) to use as a finger hole to be able to pull the insert up and out of the saw (I drilled mine at a slight angle, but a straight hole would do just fine). I then placed the insert into the saw. moved the fence over the right side of the insert and locked it down. took a long board, and placed it over the left side of the insert (to the left of where the blade is) and clamped it down on both edges of the table. This will hold the insert in place. I then started the saw,and slowly raised the blade up through the insert. and Voila! - Zero-clearance inserts at almost $0 cost.

I made 3 at the same time - might as well. and labeled the bottom of the insert with the ANGLE and BLADE MODEL so that I'll know to which setting it was made for.


hope this helps…
Great post..One question I have is how did you create the Riving knife hole?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Bosch 4100 TS - Zero-Clearance Inserts

I got a few questions about the zero-clearance inserts I made for my bosch table saw, so I figured I'd post the procedure here as to how I made those.

The basic Idea is to take the factory inserts and use that as a template for the router. but alas, the factory insert is just too thin at some points to be able to follow it with a trim router bit, so to tackle this issue I made an initial template out of 1/2" plywood. This first template took a bit more patience and care so that it matches the original shape perfectly. Once I got this 1/2" ply template I am set for as long as I need to make inserts as I can always use that template easily with a trim-bit.

Notice how the bottom face of the template has a groove in to allow the blade to fit in - this is merely done so that I could push the template in and check for precise sizing (the blade was slightly in the way):


Next I ripped some 1/2" MDF (I am not a big fan of working with MDF - health wise, but I do have some, and will rarely use it for jigs) to closely match the width of the ply-pattern, and cut it to length.

If you want, you can use a jigsaw and cut the MDF square to the insert size as close as you can to relieve the extra work from the router (next step).

I glued the ply-pattern on top of the MDF block, and with a trim-bit in my router table shaped the MDF to the exact insert size and shape.

Next, I used a straight-cut bit and trimmed the bottom face of the insert by 1/8" - this may vary depending on your saw,and your insert material (the saw lip - where the insert is being held - is 3/8" deep, and I was using 1/2" material). I found that raising the bit up, and holding the insert upright against the fence and protruding the bit 1/8" from the fence gave me cleaner more controlled cut (and also enabled me a deeper cut) as opposed to laying the insert flat on the table and having the bit extend 1/8" above the table.


Last step I cut a 3/4" hole in the front right side (away from the blade) to use as a finger hole to be able to pull the insert up and out of the saw (I drilled mine at a slight angle, but a straight hole would do just fine). I then placed the insert into the saw. moved the fence over the right side of the insert and locked it down. took a long board, and placed it over the left side of the insert (to the left of where the blade is) and clamped it down on both edges of the table. This will hold the insert in place. I then started the saw,and slowly raised the blade up through the insert. and Voila! - Zero-clearance inserts at almost $0 cost.

I made 3 at the same time - might as well. and labeled the bottom of the insert with the ANGLE and BLADE MODEL so that I'll know to which setting it was made for.


hope this helps…
sawneck - I used a jigsaw, and followed the opening made by the tablesaw-blade to make the opening for the riving knife. you could also use a hand saw, and files (to clean up the cut and widen it up)
 

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Bosch 4100 TS - Zero-Clearance Inserts

I got a few questions about the zero-clearance inserts I made for my bosch table saw, so I figured I'd post the procedure here as to how I made those.

The basic Idea is to take the factory inserts and use that as a template for the router. but alas, the factory insert is just too thin at some points to be able to follow it with a trim router bit, so to tackle this issue I made an initial template out of 1/2" plywood. This first template took a bit more patience and care so that it matches the original shape perfectly. Once I got this 1/2" ply template I am set for as long as I need to make inserts as I can always use that template easily with a trim-bit.

Notice how the bottom face of the template has a groove in to allow the blade to fit in - this is merely done so that I could push the template in and check for precise sizing (the blade was slightly in the way):


Next I ripped some 1/2" MDF (I am not a big fan of working with MDF - health wise, but I do have some, and will rarely use it for jigs) to closely match the width of the ply-pattern, and cut it to length.

If you want, you can use a jigsaw and cut the MDF square to the insert size as close as you can to relieve the extra work from the router (next step).

I glued the ply-pattern on top of the MDF block, and with a trim-bit in my router table shaped the MDF to the exact insert size and shape.

Next, I used a straight-cut bit and trimmed the bottom face of the insert by 1/8" - this may vary depending on your saw,and your insert material (the saw lip - where the insert is being held - is 3/8" deep, and I was using 1/2" material). I found that raising the bit up, and holding the insert upright against the fence and protruding the bit 1/8" from the fence gave me cleaner more controlled cut (and also enabled me a deeper cut) as opposed to laying the insert flat on the table and having the bit extend 1/8" above the table.


Last step I cut a 3/4" hole in the front right side (away from the blade) to use as a finger hole to be able to pull the insert up and out of the saw (I drilled mine at a slight angle, but a straight hole would do just fine). I then placed the insert into the saw. moved the fence over the right side of the insert and locked it down. took a long board, and placed it over the left side of the insert (to the left of where the blade is) and clamped it down on both edges of the table. This will hold the insert in place. I then started the saw,and slowly raised the blade up through the insert. and Voila! - Zero-clearance inserts at almost $0 cost.

I made 3 at the same time - might as well. and labeled the bottom of the insert with the ANGLE and BLADE MODEL so that I'll know to which setting it was made for.


hope this helps…
I always enjoy reading your articles. Of particular importance is the simple directions and solutions that you provide.
 

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