LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 115 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Mauricio,
You have just launched a discussion about tool cabinet or not.
But we can discuss 2 subjects at the same time, don't we?

I was going to launch another one on another subject:

"how deep does a workbench top really needs to be?"
to fuel the discussion :
- Your own project if I am right is a 14" wide top.

- In its 2011 presentation of "the petite roubo" Chris Schwartz says something like : "the older I get, the lesser I want a deep bench" (third video). This is kind of funny as he has induced lots of people to build mega-workbenches. The "petite roubo" has a 20" deep top.

- The workbenches build for Paul Sellers "new legacy school for woodworking" have a top ''between 13" and 14" ''. Of course the back skirt is coplanar (same level and parallel) with the top. This is necessary for planing big panels.
see : http://www.newlegacywoodworking.com/blog/

- The Moravian workbench hereabove has a top 13" wide. Will Myers says :
"The 13in wide top works out well too. I kind of had reservations about the narrow work surface but in use I have noticed that 99% of the time I am only working on the front six inches; so that concern was really unfounded. ".
He has also taken care to have the back rim of the tool tray coplanar with the top.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Al
(For those who might not already be aware)
The wagon vise needs a left hand thread. See the picture provided by Mauricio. Otherwise you have to turn the handle counter clockwise to clamp.

The traditional tail vise needs a "standard" right hand thread.

If you have already ordered the screw….
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
If you have well read the web site of Kari Hultman
http://villagecarpenter.blogspot.com/2012/04/roubo-finished.html

you will have discovered that her splendid workbench is "a traveling bench".

more traveling benches on her site :
http://villagecarpenter.blogspot.com/2011/05/have-bench-will-travel.html
http://villagecarpenter.blogspot.com/2011/05/more-traveling-benches.html
http://villagecarpenter.blogspot.com/2011/10/workbench-inspiration.html
For Andy, on this last post there is one based on a workmate.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Ryan
What about a Paul Sellers' bench type with the skirts bolted to the legs (bed bolts ? if you don't lower the upper strechers or, as it is on the short side, threaded rods from front to back).
If I have well understood the longitudinal stability is obtained by the legs being in a dado in the skirts. So the bolts would only be there to keep things toghether.
http://www.newlegacywoodworking.com/2012/04/05/benches-benches-everywhere/

The top could be kept in place with dowels as on the Moravian workbench of Will Myers (see last pictures on the page 8 :
http://www.wkfinetools.com/tMaking/art/moravianBench/moravianBench-08.asp
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Steve,
I didn't mean to critisize, what I wanted to say is that the 28 hours are for the basic bench and didn't include the time to make dog holes etc.

I would be more than happy to have one. For the time being I am working on the picnic bench in the garden, wheather permitting.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
there was some discussion hereabove
starting at #500 where the St Peters cross vise was mentionned.

As my comment #557 about it was out of sync at the time.
I wander what are your views about this design usefulness taking into account comments from Smitty, Mauricio & Techredneck (#505 to #508)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Boatman53

interesting picture.

It is the first time I see the left side of the leg vise being useful.

Did you use the pin at the bottom of the vise?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Al,

I have tried to find if there was a standard for wooden screw but without success.
The idea is to have an idea of the necessary clearances to have a smooth operation.

When you have your Lake Eerie nut and screw, would it be possible to let us know the following dimensions:

- outside diameter of the screw;
- inside diameter of the nut;
- threading depth on the screw;
- threading depth in the nut;
- screw backlash

and the TPI.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Boatman53
Excellent design.
The diagonal braces ensure the longitudinal stiffness.
Did you hand plane on it?

This assembly technique is used for decor on stage:
for those of us speaking French, look at :
http://techsceniques.clg.qc.ca/html/

then click on : "le mouchoir"
then there is a serie of 8 PPT presentations
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Taping from the top would make the joinery pore tricky but that may be part of the fun

Taping from the top on the front would not allow to abide to the Schwarz recomandation of a flush front (or at least not a vertical one).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
A chamfer at the bottom would limit the chance of splintering while dragging your bench around your shop.

on my comment herabove the word "pore" should be read "more" (the p is just above the M on an AZERTY keyboard)
The word "recomandation" should be read " recommendation".
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Mauricio,
with a proper design, the small strength you lost in the back tenon will be compensated by the strength gained with a closed front mortise
IMO the open front mortise seems to be the weak point in the rising dovetail design.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Jim,
could you explain what your gauge is measuring.

It seems to be graduated in psi. What is the area of the piston in the sensor?
Does it translate directly in Lbf?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
"the "head" and "foot" of the deadman are different pieces that are probably M&T joints. I like it but is it worth the trouble?"

This means skiding of long grain on long grain while usually you have end grain sliding on long grain.

This probably means a smoother sliding and less abrasion altough if it is waxed it should not make much diffrerence.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
off topic
31 days ago I tried to start a forum. For an unknow reason it didn't work.
I tried to send 2 mail to Martin Sojka but apparently he does not receive it either. I did not receive any answer while i believe my mails were very polite.
I can not ask for help on the forum lumberjock.com site feedback because I am denied the possibility to start any forum. If I try I receive the message :
You cannot post a new topic until your first post has been reviewed and approved.
Would one of you please contact the site administrator on my behalf.
Otherwise I would have to try to register under a new name which I don't think is a good idea.
To avoid multiple persons contacting the administrator, just first advertise here that you intend to do it.

Thank you in advance.
I am sorry for highjacking this thread
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Mauricio,
We were once talking about wood screw.
look at the last sentence on this page :
http://www.fine-tools.com/gewind.htm#ziel301855

The price of those Tap & Dye is such that you can not afford them f you don't sell some screws.
(found this on C. Schwarz blog on PWW)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
After reading :
http://paulsellers.com/2012/10/the-long-and-short-of-bench-heights/
I tried to find what health and safety people recommend.
(Do we need to reinvent the wheel?)

The height recommended by Paul Sellers is the lower limit for what is recommended for "light work"; which is consistent with using hand tools for joinery, smoothing and scraping, the rough dimensioning being made with machines as he says he does (at least that is what I understand).

This 38" height for an average man corresponds approximately to the addition of the anterior superior iliac spine height and the shoe heel height.

If you are taller or smaller, you can find yourself where it is.

Fawn Art Jewellery Fashion accessory Event
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 115 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top