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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2 species of branches found in my green waste bin - what are they?

I've had quite a weekend here in LA with the free wood gathering. It's laughable to you folks on farms, or out in the deep woods with harvestable lumber all around you, but here, we have to beg for our scraps, or put down hard earned cash at the stores :)

Thursday night after work, I came home to find the green plant-matter bin out by the road, indicating the gardeners had been by (landlady pays for them 2x/mo). Unusually, however, were limbs sticking out of it. I only have a few trees, and they don't really have anything like dying limbs that I can use. I've been interested in collecting usably-sized branches in the many species decorating streets and lawns here for use in my mini lathe, so it was an exciting moment. They don't appear to have come from my yard, so it's possible the gardners found them in their truck and threw them in my bin when they finished their work. I'd love help identifying them both.

Here are some shots of the first, twisty one:


The leaves were fuzzy, and weed-like, and I'm guessing this is considered simply a very large weed.


It goes from a tree-like brown bark to a green, plant/weed-like thing in an almost linear progression as the branches split and narrow.


It's more like a thick weed at this end:


The bulb-like, twisting bottom was obviously underground, with the dirt caked around it, and it appears they wrenched it free, perhaps with a shovel.




There are more pics in the beginning of the Flickr set here

The second species is a simpler, straighter-limbed thing. It had no leaves whatsoever, but tons of twigs in a very busy display. Here are some pics:



Lots of twigs:


The gardeners, not realizing how important these things are, were obviously a bit rough with this limb :)


One last shot of a twig, in case it helps any:


So… any ideas? I wish trees all grew with some kind of unique ID, or a barcode :)
 

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2 species of branches found in my green waste bin - what are they?

I've had quite a weekend here in LA with the free wood gathering. It's laughable to you folks on farms, or out in the deep woods with harvestable lumber all around you, but here, we have to beg for our scraps, or put down hard earned cash at the stores :)

Thursday night after work, I came home to find the green plant-matter bin out by the road, indicating the gardeners had been by (landlady pays for them 2x/mo). Unusually, however, were limbs sticking out of it. I only have a few trees, and they don't really have anything like dying limbs that I can use. I've been interested in collecting usably-sized branches in the many species decorating streets and lawns here for use in my mini lathe, so it was an exciting moment. They don't appear to have come from my yard, so it's possible the gardners found them in their truck and threw them in my bin when they finished their work. I'd love help identifying them both.

Here are some shots of the first, twisty one:


The leaves were fuzzy, and weed-like, and I'm guessing this is considered simply a very large weed.


It goes from a tree-like brown bark to a green, plant/weed-like thing in an almost linear progression as the branches split and narrow.


It's more like a thick weed at this end:


The bulb-like, twisting bottom was obviously underground, with the dirt caked around it, and it appears they wrenched it free, perhaps with a shovel.




There are more pics in the beginning of the Flickr set here

The second species is a simpler, straighter-limbed thing. It had no leaves whatsoever, but tons of twigs in a very busy display. Here are some pics:



Lots of twigs:


The gardeners, not realizing how important these things are, were obviously a bit rough with this limb :)


One last shot of a twig, in case it helps any:


So… any ideas? I wish trees all grew with some kind of unique ID, or a barcode :)
Well it's not Poison Ivy at least ! I wish I could help you on this matter . I'm trying to learn some of my local barks , etc., so I can identify trees / branches myself .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2 species of branches found in my green waste bin - what are they?

I've had quite a weekend here in LA with the free wood gathering. It's laughable to you folks on farms, or out in the deep woods with harvestable lumber all around you, but here, we have to beg for our scraps, or put down hard earned cash at the stores :)

Thursday night after work, I came home to find the green plant-matter bin out by the road, indicating the gardeners had been by (landlady pays for them 2x/mo). Unusually, however, were limbs sticking out of it. I only have a few trees, and they don't really have anything like dying limbs that I can use. I've been interested in collecting usably-sized branches in the many species decorating streets and lawns here for use in my mini lathe, so it was an exciting moment. They don't appear to have come from my yard, so it's possible the gardners found them in their truck and threw them in my bin when they finished their work. I'd love help identifying them both.

Here are some shots of the first, twisty one:


The leaves were fuzzy, and weed-like, and I'm guessing this is considered simply a very large weed.


It goes from a tree-like brown bark to a green, plant/weed-like thing in an almost linear progression as the branches split and narrow.


It's more like a thick weed at this end:


The bulb-like, twisting bottom was obviously underground, with the dirt caked around it, and it appears they wrenched it free, perhaps with a shovel.




There are more pics in the beginning of the Flickr set here

The second species is a simpler, straighter-limbed thing. It had no leaves whatsoever, but tons of twigs in a very busy display. Here are some pics:



Lots of twigs:


The gardeners, not realizing how important these things are, were obviously a bit rough with this limb :)


One last shot of a twig, in case it helps any:


So… any ideas? I wish trees all grew with some kind of unique ID, or a barcode :)
You've done it again, Rob! I think that first one is indeed a Pride of Madeira, though the internet does not seem to like 'lifting up the dress' to show me the less ornate bits (the 'trunk') underneath. They sure are pretty when they're not balled up in my green city trash bin!

Any thoughts as to the twiggy, leafless enigma in the second set of pics?

Thanks again! You're amazing.

Dusty - that's why I'm doing this, too. Just want to learn all I can, and figured this was a good forum for not only learning, but sharing the knowledge with all immediately, as I learn it :)
 

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2 species of branches found in my green waste bin - what are they?

I've had quite a weekend here in LA with the free wood gathering. It's laughable to you folks on farms, or out in the deep woods with harvestable lumber all around you, but here, we have to beg for our scraps, or put down hard earned cash at the stores :)

Thursday night after work, I came home to find the green plant-matter bin out by the road, indicating the gardeners had been by (landlady pays for them 2x/mo). Unusually, however, were limbs sticking out of it. I only have a few trees, and they don't really have anything like dying limbs that I can use. I've been interested in collecting usably-sized branches in the many species decorating streets and lawns here for use in my mini lathe, so it was an exciting moment. They don't appear to have come from my yard, so it's possible the gardners found them in their truck and threw them in my bin when they finished their work. I'd love help identifying them both.

Here are some shots of the first, twisty one:


The leaves were fuzzy, and weed-like, and I'm guessing this is considered simply a very large weed.


It goes from a tree-like brown bark to a green, plant/weed-like thing in an almost linear progression as the branches split and narrow.


It's more like a thick weed at this end:


The bulb-like, twisting bottom was obviously underground, with the dirt caked around it, and it appears they wrenched it free, perhaps with a shovel.




There are more pics in the beginning of the Flickr set here

The second species is a simpler, straighter-limbed thing. It had no leaves whatsoever, but tons of twigs in a very busy display. Here are some pics:



Lots of twigs:


The gardeners, not realizing how important these things are, were obviously a bit rough with this limb :)


One last shot of a twig, in case it helps any:


So… any ideas? I wish trees all grew with some kind of unique ID, or a barcode :)
this is like watching an episode of CSI!!!
 

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2 species of branches found in my green waste bin - what are they?

I've had quite a weekend here in LA with the free wood gathering. It's laughable to you folks on farms, or out in the deep woods with harvestable lumber all around you, but here, we have to beg for our scraps, or put down hard earned cash at the stores :)

Thursday night after work, I came home to find the green plant-matter bin out by the road, indicating the gardeners had been by (landlady pays for them 2x/mo). Unusually, however, were limbs sticking out of it. I only have a few trees, and they don't really have anything like dying limbs that I can use. I've been interested in collecting usably-sized branches in the many species decorating streets and lawns here for use in my mini lathe, so it was an exciting moment. They don't appear to have come from my yard, so it's possible the gardners found them in their truck and threw them in my bin when they finished their work. I'd love help identifying them both.

Here are some shots of the first, twisty one:


The leaves were fuzzy, and weed-like, and I'm guessing this is considered simply a very large weed.


It goes from a tree-like brown bark to a green, plant/weed-like thing in an almost linear progression as the branches split and narrow.


It's more like a thick weed at this end:


The bulb-like, twisting bottom was obviously underground, with the dirt caked around it, and it appears they wrenched it free, perhaps with a shovel.




There are more pics in the beginning of the Flickr set here

The second species is a simpler, straighter-limbed thing. It had no leaves whatsoever, but tons of twigs in a very busy display. Here are some pics:



Lots of twigs:


The gardeners, not realizing how important these things are, were obviously a bit rough with this limb :)


One last shot of a twig, in case it helps any:


So… any ideas? I wish trees all grew with some kind of unique ID, or a barcode :)
Have you posted this question to the experts on our sister site , "Garden Tenders" ?
You're already a member so all you have to do is sign in : )
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
2 species of branches found in my green waste bin - what are they?

I've had quite a weekend here in LA with the free wood gathering. It's laughable to you folks on farms, or out in the deep woods with harvestable lumber all around you, but here, we have to beg for our scraps, or put down hard earned cash at the stores :)

Thursday night after work, I came home to find the green plant-matter bin out by the road, indicating the gardeners had been by (landlady pays for them 2x/mo). Unusually, however, were limbs sticking out of it. I only have a few trees, and they don't really have anything like dying limbs that I can use. I've been interested in collecting usably-sized branches in the many species decorating streets and lawns here for use in my mini lathe, so it was an exciting moment. They don't appear to have come from my yard, so it's possible the gardners found them in their truck and threw them in my bin when they finished their work. I'd love help identifying them both.

Here are some shots of the first, twisty one:


The leaves were fuzzy, and weed-like, and I'm guessing this is considered simply a very large weed.


It goes from a tree-like brown bark to a green, plant/weed-like thing in an almost linear progression as the branches split and narrow.


It's more like a thick weed at this end:


The bulb-like, twisting bottom was obviously underground, with the dirt caked around it, and it appears they wrenched it free, perhaps with a shovel.




There are more pics in the beginning of the Flickr set here

The second species is a simpler, straighter-limbed thing. It had no leaves whatsoever, but tons of twigs in a very busy display. Here are some pics:



Lots of twigs:


The gardeners, not realizing how important these things are, were obviously a bit rough with this limb :)


One last shot of a twig, in case it helps any:


So… any ideas? I wish trees all grew with some kind of unique ID, or a barcode :)
Debbie - I know! Exciting, isn't it? :)

Dusty - That's a great idea. Rob in the first comment here nailed down the Pride of Madeira for me, but I still don't know what the other branch is. Thanks for the tip!
 

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2 species of branches found in my green waste bin - what are they?

I've had quite a weekend here in LA with the free wood gathering. It's laughable to you folks on farms, or out in the deep woods with harvestable lumber all around you, but here, we have to beg for our scraps, or put down hard earned cash at the stores :)

Thursday night after work, I came home to find the green plant-matter bin out by the road, indicating the gardeners had been by (landlady pays for them 2x/mo). Unusually, however, were limbs sticking out of it. I only have a few trees, and they don't really have anything like dying limbs that I can use. I've been interested in collecting usably-sized branches in the many species decorating streets and lawns here for use in my mini lathe, so it was an exciting moment. They don't appear to have come from my yard, so it's possible the gardners found them in their truck and threw them in my bin when they finished their work. I'd love help identifying them both.

Here are some shots of the first, twisty one:


The leaves were fuzzy, and weed-like, and I'm guessing this is considered simply a very large weed.


It goes from a tree-like brown bark to a green, plant/weed-like thing in an almost linear progression as the branches split and narrow.


It's more like a thick weed at this end:


The bulb-like, twisting bottom was obviously underground, with the dirt caked around it, and it appears they wrenched it free, perhaps with a shovel.




There are more pics in the beginning of the Flickr set here

The second species is a simpler, straighter-limbed thing. It had no leaves whatsoever, but tons of twigs in a very busy display. Here are some pics:



Lots of twigs:


The gardeners, not realizing how important these things are, were obviously a bit rough with this limb :)


One last shot of a twig, in case it helps any:


So… any ideas? I wish trees all grew with some kind of unique ID, or a barcode :)
definitely! I'm almost on the edge of my seat watching you play detective, waiting for you to solve the case :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A look inside the second mystery branch

It would seem Rob (user: socalwood) nailed another species down for me in my previous post - the Pride of Madeira - going off nothing more than one gnarled limb (which turned out to be the whole trunk and some branches of a small plant) and some withering leaves. Great job, Rob!

I looked a bit more into one of the few branches of the second mystery species, and found a yellowy, eccentrically-ringed wood that seems to love to split along its length down its ring and ray lines. I'm hoping it'll dry out and harden up so that I may use it in my mini lathe. If it stays this prone to splitting, however, the best I may be able to do is turning it carefully in a chuck, as the pressure of centers could split it apart. Here are some pictures inside a thin limb of about 1" and under in diameter. I have another one that's more in the neighborhood of 1.5".

I cut it up with a Japanese flush cut saw from Rockler. I love the finish sawing with that thing leaves, and it flushes things so perfectly - pegs, pocket hole plugs, etc. - you can't feel them. I've even used it to do the work of a laminate trimmer. It cuts very fast in all the woods I've tried it in, and with no effort at all:


Note the eccentricity - the rings are anything but centered in relation to each other:


The eccentricity reminds me of a certain Hollywood Juniper limb I cut down last year, the pieces of which are still drying in my shop, for use eventually on the mini lathe. I keep thinking that eccentricity like this is just a hallmark of a lot of fast growing species. The rings in this are pretty far apart in some areas - 1/4" or more - and that seems like fast growth to me. Maybe not.


Mineral stains reminded me a lot of poplar I've seen, and for all I know it could be any of the related poplars or tulip woods. It really likes to split along its ray and ring lines. The splits were already there, or appeared in pieces that fell to the floor (not sure if that caused them, though). I didn't cause any splits with my sawing:



There's a kind of fiery sunburst around the outer edge, inside the outer bark. I researched for awhile, but still can't tell my vascular cambium from my secondary phloem, so I'm useless to explain what I'm seeing here, other than that it looks neat. It seems online you either find colored microscopic slides of cellular level things, or illustrations of the larger stuff, but no actual labeled real photos of a variety of tree and limb cross sections to really give you a better sense of what you're seeing. This doesn't match up with pretty much anything I found:



This piece was already split, so I cut around it, but it's pretty detailed inside, with another internal split, mineral stains, wood in various states of dryness, what almost appears to be rot, or spalting (though I don't think it is), and much else. It was fun to just wander around it with my eyes, trying to understand everything inside:



I haven't room in my shop to build tables, couches, beds, or rowboats, but I also have a real love of tiny, detailed things, so these little limbs, which can be turned into very tiny things (hopefully) are still rather delightful to me. With the fractal nature of trees, all of the hallmarks of woodworking are still found in miniature in these tiny 'logs," so in a sense, I almost feel like I'm doing regular woodworking, but as a giant :)
 

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A look inside the second mystery branch

It would seem Rob (user: socalwood) nailed another species down for me in my previous post - the Pride of Madeira - going off nothing more than one gnarled limb (which turned out to be the whole trunk and some branches of a small plant) and some withering leaves. Great job, Rob!

I looked a bit more into one of the few branches of the second mystery species, and found a yellowy, eccentrically-ringed wood that seems to love to split along its length down its ring and ray lines. I'm hoping it'll dry out and harden up so that I may use it in my mini lathe. If it stays this prone to splitting, however, the best I may be able to do is turning it carefully in a chuck, as the pressure of centers could split it apart. Here are some pictures inside a thin limb of about 1" and under in diameter. I have another one that's more in the neighborhood of 1.5".

I cut it up with a Japanese flush cut saw from Rockler. I love the finish sawing with that thing leaves, and it flushes things so perfectly - pegs, pocket hole plugs, etc. - you can't feel them. I've even used it to do the work of a laminate trimmer. It cuts very fast in all the woods I've tried it in, and with no effort at all:


Note the eccentricity - the rings are anything but centered in relation to each other:


The eccentricity reminds me of a certain Hollywood Juniper limb I cut down last year, the pieces of which are still drying in my shop, for use eventually on the mini lathe. I keep thinking that eccentricity like this is just a hallmark of a lot of fast growing species. The rings in this are pretty far apart in some areas - 1/4" or more - and that seems like fast growth to me. Maybe not.


Mineral stains reminded me a lot of poplar I've seen, and for all I know it could be any of the related poplars or tulip woods. It really likes to split along its ray and ring lines. The splits were already there, or appeared in pieces that fell to the floor (not sure if that caused them, though). I didn't cause any splits with my sawing:



There's a kind of fiery sunburst around the outer edge, inside the outer bark. I researched for awhile, but still can't tell my vascular cambium from my secondary phloem, so I'm useless to explain what I'm seeing here, other than that it looks neat. It seems online you either find colored microscopic slides of cellular level things, or illustrations of the larger stuff, but no actual labeled real photos of a variety of tree and limb cross sections to really give you a better sense of what you're seeing. This doesn't match up with pretty much anything I found:



This piece was already split, so I cut around it, but it's pretty detailed inside, with another internal split, mineral stains, wood in various states of dryness, what almost appears to be rot, or spalting (though I don't think it is), and much else. It was fun to just wander around it with my eyes, trying to understand everything inside:



I haven't room in my shop to build tables, couches, beds, or rowboats, but I also have a real love of tiny, detailed things, so these little limbs, which can be turned into very tiny things (hopefully) are still rather delightful to me. With the fractal nature of trees, all of the hallmarks of woodworking are still found in miniature in these tiny 'logs," so in a sense, I almost feel like I'm doing regular woodworking, but as a giant :)
Interesting growth rings. How hard is this wood? Does it shape well?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A look inside the second mystery branch

It would seem Rob (user: socalwood) nailed another species down for me in my previous post - the Pride of Madeira - going off nothing more than one gnarled limb (which turned out to be the whole trunk and some branches of a small plant) and some withering leaves. Great job, Rob!

I looked a bit more into one of the few branches of the second mystery species, and found a yellowy, eccentrically-ringed wood that seems to love to split along its length down its ring and ray lines. I'm hoping it'll dry out and harden up so that I may use it in my mini lathe. If it stays this prone to splitting, however, the best I may be able to do is turning it carefully in a chuck, as the pressure of centers could split it apart. Here are some pictures inside a thin limb of about 1" and under in diameter. I have another one that's more in the neighborhood of 1.5".

I cut it up with a Japanese flush cut saw from Rockler. I love the finish sawing with that thing leaves, and it flushes things so perfectly - pegs, pocket hole plugs, etc. - you can't feel them. I've even used it to do the work of a laminate trimmer. It cuts very fast in all the woods I've tried it in, and with no effort at all:


Note the eccentricity - the rings are anything but centered in relation to each other:


The eccentricity reminds me of a certain Hollywood Juniper limb I cut down last year, the pieces of which are still drying in my shop, for use eventually on the mini lathe. I keep thinking that eccentricity like this is just a hallmark of a lot of fast growing species. The rings in this are pretty far apart in some areas - 1/4" or more - and that seems like fast growth to me. Maybe not.


Mineral stains reminded me a lot of poplar I've seen, and for all I know it could be any of the related poplars or tulip woods. It really likes to split along its ray and ring lines. The splits were already there, or appeared in pieces that fell to the floor (not sure if that caused them, though). I didn't cause any splits with my sawing:



There's a kind of fiery sunburst around the outer edge, inside the outer bark. I researched for awhile, but still can't tell my vascular cambium from my secondary phloem, so I'm useless to explain what I'm seeing here, other than that it looks neat. It seems online you either find colored microscopic slides of cellular level things, or illustrations of the larger stuff, but no actual labeled real photos of a variety of tree and limb cross sections to really give you a better sense of what you're seeing. This doesn't match up with pretty much anything I found:



This piece was already split, so I cut around it, but it's pretty detailed inside, with another internal split, mineral stains, wood in various states of dryness, what almost appears to be rot, or spalting (though I don't think it is), and much else. It was fun to just wander around it with my eyes, trying to understand everything inside:



I haven't room in my shop to build tables, couches, beds, or rowboats, but I also have a real love of tiny, detailed things, so these little limbs, which can be turned into very tiny things (hopefully) are still rather delightful to me. With the fractal nature of trees, all of the hallmarks of woodworking are still found in miniature in these tiny 'logs," so in a sense, I almost feel like I'm doing regular woodworking, but as a giant :)
mmh - The pieces you're seeing here are about as thick as my middle finger. I was going to try to do something with them, but eventually got tired of moving the little plastic shopping bag all around the garage out of my way and dumped them in the green recycling bin. They weren't really hard. They were still kind of close to new/green plant growth, really. They had a stinky smell, like salt and brackish water. I did turn one on my lathe out of curiosity, and it just looked like yellow/white wood. The cool patterns at the end didn't translate to a pretty turning. Never did ID it. The gardeners threw it in my green waste bin, but it's not from anywhere around my property. They must have had a branch stuck to their truck or in the bed when they arrived and just threw it in my bin, where I discovered it later. I'm much less excited about 'sticks' these days, as I've since found lots of piles of respectably sized logs to play with here in west LA :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Another found ornamental tree, with a mystery hole

More trash pick… I mean, recycling this past Thursday night. Someone in the neighborhood threw out what in the dark after work seemed like it might be plastic, but back in my garage turned out to be something with the texture, and a bit of the overall look of a plum, with smooth brown skin that seemed to have a purplish cast to it.

I think it's either a whole small tree, or the top of a very tall larger tree, as it doesn't seem to branch in the way a branch would. It's too radially uniform around the center line. It was a piece roughly cut at the base, and about 7'-8' tall.









The tip and every little twig terminated in a little fuzzy bud, reminiscent [mildly] of a pussy willow, and there were less mature buds and leaf scars regularly spaced along each twig:





I noticed in the dirty, rough-cut at the base a hole with a membranous covering, like hard, milky-white, translucent plastic. When I cut the limb into pieces for use in my mini lathe, or side projects (got a few ideas), I found the hole ran through the entire thing, even the thin branches:











I had cut off the end to clean it up, and found that the hole through the middle with its membrane caps let some light through. It was translucent. I tried to learn a bit more by peeling off the bark, and cutting through the cylindrical hole running up the middle. What I found were chambers running through the entire thing, like very short bamboo segments:















Some cuts revealed some branch lines radiating from the center out. Note that these limbs are really wet inside:



I got 16 little twigs of varying widths and lengths. I'd like to make a little natural birdcage out of them, and at around 2" spacing, I can do about a 10" diameter cage, and I have some ideas I think will be pretty cool for how to fasten them together into a ring, and how to create the door. The top remains TBD :)





And of course, my immediate question was: "Can I turn any of this on the lathe?" Obviously, the central hole made for a great on-centers setup, if it also meant I couldn't turn too thin. I got a chance with this to try out my new Sorby Spindlemaster, on sale recently at Rockler for 20% off. I only buy those pricey things on sale.



It smelled just like carving a pumpkin, and turned very easily. It's pretty firm, though wet. The colors were amazing. It has a [I think it's the right term] cambium layer that's fluorescent green, like antifreeze, some mustard-colored areas under each branch root, and pale, maple-colored interior, with an ultra-straight grain. I was half expecting it to shred like a weed, but it held up beautifully under the turning tool. I was impressed:







I made a nice little mess of wet shavings, and got some unfortunately blurry pics of the debarked piece. My auto-focus was aiming for the lathe table (machining mill part), I guess:







It almost seems like it would work for some pen turning, except it definitely wouldn't be a high quality hardwood pen :)





Parting shot of the mess:



Anyone have any idea what tree this is from? A couple more shots and descriptions in the Flickr set.
 

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Another found ornamental tree, with a mystery hole

More trash pick… I mean, recycling this past Thursday night. Someone in the neighborhood threw out what in the dark after work seemed like it might be plastic, but back in my garage turned out to be something with the texture, and a bit of the overall look of a plum, with smooth brown skin that seemed to have a purplish cast to it.

I think it's either a whole small tree, or the top of a very tall larger tree, as it doesn't seem to branch in the way a branch would. It's too radially uniform around the center line. It was a piece roughly cut at the base, and about 7'-8' tall.









The tip and every little twig terminated in a little fuzzy bud, reminiscent [mildly] of a pussy willow, and there were less mature buds and leaf scars regularly spaced along each twig:





I noticed in the dirty, rough-cut at the base a hole with a membranous covering, like hard, milky-white, translucent plastic. When I cut the limb into pieces for use in my mini lathe, or side projects (got a few ideas), I found the hole ran through the entire thing, even the thin branches:











I had cut off the end to clean it up, and found that the hole through the middle with its membrane caps let some light through. It was translucent. I tried to learn a bit more by peeling off the bark, and cutting through the cylindrical hole running up the middle. What I found were chambers running through the entire thing, like very short bamboo segments:















Some cuts revealed some branch lines radiating from the center out. Note that these limbs are really wet inside:



I got 16 little twigs of varying widths and lengths. I'd like to make a little natural birdcage out of them, and at around 2" spacing, I can do about a 10" diameter cage, and I have some ideas I think will be pretty cool for how to fasten them together into a ring, and how to create the door. The top remains TBD :)





And of course, my immediate question was: "Can I turn any of this on the lathe?" Obviously, the central hole made for a great on-centers setup, if it also meant I couldn't turn too thin. I got a chance with this to try out my new Sorby Spindlemaster, on sale recently at Rockler for 20% off. I only buy those pricey things on sale.



It smelled just like carving a pumpkin, and turned very easily. It's pretty firm, though wet. The colors were amazing. It has a [I think it's the right term] cambium layer that's fluorescent green, like antifreeze, some mustard-colored areas under each branch root, and pale, maple-colored interior, with an ultra-straight grain. I was half expecting it to shred like a weed, but it held up beautifully under the turning tool. I was impressed:







I made a nice little mess of wet shavings, and got some unfortunately blurry pics of the debarked piece. My auto-focus was aiming for the lathe table (machining mill part), I guess:







It almost seems like it would work for some pen turning, except it definitely wouldn't be a high quality hardwood pen :)





Parting shot of the mess:



Anyone have any idea what tree this is from? A couple more shots and descriptions in the Flickr set.
Interesting. Apparently no tree, sapling or scion is safe from you. }:)~
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Another found ornamental tree, with a mystery hole

More trash pick… I mean, recycling this past Thursday night. Someone in the neighborhood threw out what in the dark after work seemed like it might be plastic, but back in my garage turned out to be something with the texture, and a bit of the overall look of a plum, with smooth brown skin that seemed to have a purplish cast to it.

I think it's either a whole small tree, or the top of a very tall larger tree, as it doesn't seem to branch in the way a branch would. It's too radially uniform around the center line. It was a piece roughly cut at the base, and about 7'-8' tall.









The tip and every little twig terminated in a little fuzzy bud, reminiscent [mildly] of a pussy willow, and there were less mature buds and leaf scars regularly spaced along each twig:





I noticed in the dirty, rough-cut at the base a hole with a membranous covering, like hard, milky-white, translucent plastic. When I cut the limb into pieces for use in my mini lathe, or side projects (got a few ideas), I found the hole ran through the entire thing, even the thin branches:











I had cut off the end to clean it up, and found that the hole through the middle with its membrane caps let some light through. It was translucent. I tried to learn a bit more by peeling off the bark, and cutting through the cylindrical hole running up the middle. What I found were chambers running through the entire thing, like very short bamboo segments:















Some cuts revealed some branch lines radiating from the center out. Note that these limbs are really wet inside:



I got 16 little twigs of varying widths and lengths. I'd like to make a little natural birdcage out of them, and at around 2" spacing, I can do about a 10" diameter cage, and I have some ideas I think will be pretty cool for how to fasten them together into a ring, and how to create the door. The top remains TBD :)





And of course, my immediate question was: "Can I turn any of this on the lathe?" Obviously, the central hole made for a great on-centers setup, if it also meant I couldn't turn too thin. I got a chance with this to try out my new Sorby Spindlemaster, on sale recently at Rockler for 20% off. I only buy those pricey things on sale.



It smelled just like carving a pumpkin, and turned very easily. It's pretty firm, though wet. The colors were amazing. It has a [I think it's the right term] cambium layer that's fluorescent green, like antifreeze, some mustard-colored areas under each branch root, and pale, maple-colored interior, with an ultra-straight grain. I was half expecting it to shred like a weed, but it held up beautifully under the turning tool. I was impressed:







I made a nice little mess of wet shavings, and got some unfortunately blurry pics of the debarked piece. My auto-focus was aiming for the lathe table (machining mill part), I guess:







It almost seems like it would work for some pen turning, except it definitely wouldn't be a high quality hardwood pen :)





Parting shot of the mess:



Anyone have any idea what tree this is from? A couple more shots and descriptions in the Flickr set.
I'll track them all down one day!
 

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Another found ornamental tree, with a mystery hole

More trash pick… I mean, recycling this past Thursday night. Someone in the neighborhood threw out what in the dark after work seemed like it might be plastic, but back in my garage turned out to be something with the texture, and a bit of the overall look of a plum, with smooth brown skin that seemed to have a purplish cast to it.

I think it's either a whole small tree, or the top of a very tall larger tree, as it doesn't seem to branch in the way a branch would. It's too radially uniform around the center line. It was a piece roughly cut at the base, and about 7'-8' tall.









The tip and every little twig terminated in a little fuzzy bud, reminiscent [mildly] of a pussy willow, and there were less mature buds and leaf scars regularly spaced along each twig:





I noticed in the dirty, rough-cut at the base a hole with a membranous covering, like hard, milky-white, translucent plastic. When I cut the limb into pieces for use in my mini lathe, or side projects (got a few ideas), I found the hole ran through the entire thing, even the thin branches:











I had cut off the end to clean it up, and found that the hole through the middle with its membrane caps let some light through. It was translucent. I tried to learn a bit more by peeling off the bark, and cutting through the cylindrical hole running up the middle. What I found were chambers running through the entire thing, like very short bamboo segments:















Some cuts revealed some branch lines radiating from the center out. Note that these limbs are really wet inside:



I got 16 little twigs of varying widths and lengths. I'd like to make a little natural birdcage out of them, and at around 2" spacing, I can do about a 10" diameter cage, and I have some ideas I think will be pretty cool for how to fasten them together into a ring, and how to create the door. The top remains TBD :)





And of course, my immediate question was: "Can I turn any of this on the lathe?" Obviously, the central hole made for a great on-centers setup, if it also meant I couldn't turn too thin. I got a chance with this to try out my new Sorby Spindlemaster, on sale recently at Rockler for 20% off. I only buy those pricey things on sale.



It smelled just like carving a pumpkin, and turned very easily. It's pretty firm, though wet. The colors were amazing. It has a [I think it's the right term] cambium layer that's fluorescent green, like antifreeze, some mustard-colored areas under each branch root, and pale, maple-colored interior, with an ultra-straight grain. I was half expecting it to shred like a weed, but it held up beautifully under the turning tool. I was impressed:







I made a nice little mess of wet shavings, and got some unfortunately blurry pics of the debarked piece. My auto-focus was aiming for the lathe table (machining mill part), I guess:







It almost seems like it would work for some pen turning, except it definitely wouldn't be a high quality hardwood pen :)





Parting shot of the mess:



Anyone have any idea what tree this is from? A couple more shots and descriptions in the Flickr set.
well who would have thought that such beautiful possibilities were hiding in that piece of wood!
 

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Another found ornamental tree, with a mystery hole

More trash pick… I mean, recycling this past Thursday night. Someone in the neighborhood threw out what in the dark after work seemed like it might be plastic, but back in my garage turned out to be something with the texture, and a bit of the overall look of a plum, with smooth brown skin that seemed to have a purplish cast to it.

I think it's either a whole small tree, or the top of a very tall larger tree, as it doesn't seem to branch in the way a branch would. It's too radially uniform around the center line. It was a piece roughly cut at the base, and about 7'-8' tall.









The tip and every little twig terminated in a little fuzzy bud, reminiscent [mildly] of a pussy willow, and there were less mature buds and leaf scars regularly spaced along each twig:





I noticed in the dirty, rough-cut at the base a hole with a membranous covering, like hard, milky-white, translucent plastic. When I cut the limb into pieces for use in my mini lathe, or side projects (got a few ideas), I found the hole ran through the entire thing, even the thin branches:











I had cut off the end to clean it up, and found that the hole through the middle with its membrane caps let some light through. It was translucent. I tried to learn a bit more by peeling off the bark, and cutting through the cylindrical hole running up the middle. What I found were chambers running through the entire thing, like very short bamboo segments:















Some cuts revealed some branch lines radiating from the center out. Note that these limbs are really wet inside:



I got 16 little twigs of varying widths and lengths. I'd like to make a little natural birdcage out of them, and at around 2" spacing, I can do about a 10" diameter cage, and I have some ideas I think will be pretty cool for how to fasten them together into a ring, and how to create the door. The top remains TBD :)





And of course, my immediate question was: "Can I turn any of this on the lathe?" Obviously, the central hole made for a great on-centers setup, if it also meant I couldn't turn too thin. I got a chance with this to try out my new Sorby Spindlemaster, on sale recently at Rockler for 20% off. I only buy those pricey things on sale.



It smelled just like carving a pumpkin, and turned very easily. It's pretty firm, though wet. The colors were amazing. It has a [I think it's the right term] cambium layer that's fluorescent green, like antifreeze, some mustard-colored areas under each branch root, and pale, maple-colored interior, with an ultra-straight grain. I was half expecting it to shred like a weed, but it held up beautifully under the turning tool. I was impressed:







I made a nice little mess of wet shavings, and got some unfortunately blurry pics of the debarked piece. My auto-focus was aiming for the lathe table (machining mill part), I guess:







It almost seems like it would work for some pen turning, except it definitely wouldn't be a high quality hardwood pen :)





Parting shot of the mess:



Anyone have any idea what tree this is from? A couple more shots and descriptions in the Flickr set.
with those buds and having a chambered pith so it most likely walnut….thats my guess anyway
 

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Another found ornamental tree, with a mystery hole

More trash pick… I mean, recycling this past Thursday night. Someone in the neighborhood threw out what in the dark after work seemed like it might be plastic, but back in my garage turned out to be something with the texture, and a bit of the overall look of a plum, with smooth brown skin that seemed to have a purplish cast to it.

I think it's either a whole small tree, or the top of a very tall larger tree, as it doesn't seem to branch in the way a branch would. It's too radially uniform around the center line. It was a piece roughly cut at the base, and about 7'-8' tall.









The tip and every little twig terminated in a little fuzzy bud, reminiscent [mildly] of a pussy willow, and there were less mature buds and leaf scars regularly spaced along each twig:





I noticed in the dirty, rough-cut at the base a hole with a membranous covering, like hard, milky-white, translucent plastic. When I cut the limb into pieces for use in my mini lathe, or side projects (got a few ideas), I found the hole ran through the entire thing, even the thin branches:











I had cut off the end to clean it up, and found that the hole through the middle with its membrane caps let some light through. It was translucent. I tried to learn a bit more by peeling off the bark, and cutting through the cylindrical hole running up the middle. What I found were chambers running through the entire thing, like very short bamboo segments:















Some cuts revealed some branch lines radiating from the center out. Note that these limbs are really wet inside:



I got 16 little twigs of varying widths and lengths. I'd like to make a little natural birdcage out of them, and at around 2" spacing, I can do about a 10" diameter cage, and I have some ideas I think will be pretty cool for how to fasten them together into a ring, and how to create the door. The top remains TBD :)





And of course, my immediate question was: "Can I turn any of this on the lathe?" Obviously, the central hole made for a great on-centers setup, if it also meant I couldn't turn too thin. I got a chance with this to try out my new Sorby Spindlemaster, on sale recently at Rockler for 20% off. I only buy those pricey things on sale.



It smelled just like carving a pumpkin, and turned very easily. It's pretty firm, though wet. The colors were amazing. It has a [I think it's the right term] cambium layer that's fluorescent green, like antifreeze, some mustard-colored areas under each branch root, and pale, maple-colored interior, with an ultra-straight grain. I was half expecting it to shred like a weed, but it held up beautifully under the turning tool. I was impressed:







I made a nice little mess of wet shavings, and got some unfortunately blurry pics of the debarked piece. My auto-focus was aiming for the lathe table (machining mill part), I guess:







It almost seems like it would work for some pen turning, except it definitely wouldn't be a high quality hardwood pen :)





Parting shot of the mess:



Anyone have any idea what tree this is from? A couple more shots and descriptions in the Flickr set.
To me this looks like a "tree of heaven" It grows as a weed here in IL, and stinks when the bark is stripped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Another found ornamental tree, with a mystery hole

More trash pick… I mean, recycling this past Thursday night. Someone in the neighborhood threw out what in the dark after work seemed like it might be plastic, but back in my garage turned out to be something with the texture, and a bit of the overall look of a plum, with smooth brown skin that seemed to have a purplish cast to it.

I think it's either a whole small tree, or the top of a very tall larger tree, as it doesn't seem to branch in the way a branch would. It's too radially uniform around the center line. It was a piece roughly cut at the base, and about 7'-8' tall.









The tip and every little twig terminated in a little fuzzy bud, reminiscent [mildly] of a pussy willow, and there were less mature buds and leaf scars regularly spaced along each twig:





I noticed in the dirty, rough-cut at the base a hole with a membranous covering, like hard, milky-white, translucent plastic. When I cut the limb into pieces for use in my mini lathe, or side projects (got a few ideas), I found the hole ran through the entire thing, even the thin branches:











I had cut off the end to clean it up, and found that the hole through the middle with its membrane caps let some light through. It was translucent. I tried to learn a bit more by peeling off the bark, and cutting through the cylindrical hole running up the middle. What I found were chambers running through the entire thing, like very short bamboo segments:















Some cuts revealed some branch lines radiating from the center out. Note that these limbs are really wet inside:



I got 16 little twigs of varying widths and lengths. I'd like to make a little natural birdcage out of them, and at around 2" spacing, I can do about a 10" diameter cage, and I have some ideas I think will be pretty cool for how to fasten them together into a ring, and how to create the door. The top remains TBD :)





And of course, my immediate question was: "Can I turn any of this on the lathe?" Obviously, the central hole made for a great on-centers setup, if it also meant I couldn't turn too thin. I got a chance with this to try out my new Sorby Spindlemaster, on sale recently at Rockler for 20% off. I only buy those pricey things on sale.



It smelled just like carving a pumpkin, and turned very easily. It's pretty firm, though wet. The colors were amazing. It has a [I think it's the right term] cambium layer that's fluorescent green, like antifreeze, some mustard-colored areas under each branch root, and pale, maple-colored interior, with an ultra-straight grain. I was half expecting it to shred like a weed, but it held up beautifully under the turning tool. I was impressed:







I made a nice little mess of wet shavings, and got some unfortunately blurry pics of the debarked piece. My auto-focus was aiming for the lathe table (machining mill part), I guess:







It almost seems like it would work for some pen turning, except it definitely wouldn't be a high quality hardwood pen :)





Parting shot of the mess:



Anyone have any idea what tree this is from? A couple more shots and descriptions in the Flickr set.
Treeclimber - I came to the same conclusion! Don't miss the follow-up post here.

neetodude - I'm 100% sure it's a walnut, but only about 90% certain it's a black walnut. Check out the link above for my follow-up post with reasons as to why I think this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
mystery ornamental branch identified

After some online snooping, it looks like the branch I found the other day is of the Juglandaceae Family, which is to say it's a walnut. Here's some evidence…

The chambers in the middle, seen here in my sample comprise what is known as a "chambered pith" (a pith being the center of a tree/branch/twig). Here's how it happens (in elaborate, if brief science talk). When it comes to chambered piths, it seems the only two choices spoken of online are black walnut (Juglans nigra), and butternut (Juglans cinerea), aka "white walnut." Here a dichotomous tree terminates in those choices after choosing "chambered pith."

Wikipedia's entry on the walnut tree features this image of the chambered pith of a black walnut. I'm a little iffy on it being a black walnut, however, as some shots, like those found on this page show that while the chambered pith is similar, the wood in that shot seems more woody, and the twig shots seem hairy, whereas my limb was smooth and hairless. However, at this great page on butternut, and its sister page on black walnut, there's a comparison shot of the twigs of both which suggests that if either, I have black walnut. The buds on butternut are pointier and longer, and the leaf scars much larger, with a shape that's elongated more down the stem. Even the author of those pages implies it's not always easy to tell them apart for a novice like me.

There are some more good shots of young butternut twigs here, and they certainly do show some similarities, like the bark color and texture, and the distribution of the little white dots, or "lenticels" (pronounced LEN-tih-kuls), which act as pores to bring oxygen into the growing limb, similar to those found on my silver birch. For reference again, here are my twigs: one, two, and three, with clearer views of the lenticels here and here. In that last one the lenticels are fading, and the trunk right between my fingers seems to be gearing up to split into the more textured, woody bark of older trees.

Here's a shot of black walnut on Flickr that shows more of the transition from young to mature tree. Its buds do look a lot like those on my samples. There's a bit more on butternut, black walnut, and hickory (also in the Juglandaceae Family) here. Making things more difficult is the fact that there are 8 genera in Juglandaceae, and its genus Juglans alone is divided into 4 sections. The Japanese Walnut (J. ailantifolia) isn't too dissimilar, telling me that I'd probably have to run through all of the Juglandaceae Family to know for sure what I have.

For now, I'm going to say it's a black walnut, and be happy :) I suppose I could always send my Flickr set to The Walnut Council and see what they have to say about it. There's a council for everything! Anyway, pretty neat to get a chance to work in walnut this young, though I wouldn't go chopping one down on my own for the opportunity.
 

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mystery ornamental branch identified

After some online snooping, it looks like the branch I found the other day is of the Juglandaceae Family, which is to say it's a walnut. Here's some evidence…

The chambers in the middle, seen here in my sample comprise what is known as a "chambered pith" (a pith being the center of a tree/branch/twig). Here's how it happens (in elaborate, if brief science talk). When it comes to chambered piths, it seems the only two choices spoken of online are black walnut (Juglans nigra), and butternut (Juglans cinerea), aka "white walnut." Here a dichotomous tree terminates in those choices after choosing "chambered pith."

Wikipedia's entry on the walnut tree features this image of the chambered pith of a black walnut. I'm a little iffy on it being a black walnut, however, as some shots, like those found on this page show that while the chambered pith is similar, the wood in that shot seems more woody, and the twig shots seem hairy, whereas my limb was smooth and hairless. However, at this great page on butternut, and its sister page on black walnut, there's a comparison shot of the twigs of both which suggests that if either, I have black walnut. The buds on butternut are pointier and longer, and the leaf scars much larger, with a shape that's elongated more down the stem. Even the author of those pages implies it's not always easy to tell them apart for a novice like me.

There are some more good shots of young butternut twigs here, and they certainly do show some similarities, like the bark color and texture, and the distribution of the little white dots, or "lenticels" (pronounced LEN-tih-kuls), which act as pores to bring oxygen into the growing limb, similar to those found on my silver birch. For reference again, here are my twigs: one, two, and three, with clearer views of the lenticels here and here. In that last one the lenticels are fading, and the trunk right between my fingers seems to be gearing up to split into the more textured, woody bark of older trees.

Here's a shot of black walnut on Flickr that shows more of the transition from young to mature tree. Its buds do look a lot like those on my samples. There's a bit more on butternut, black walnut, and hickory (also in the Juglandaceae Family) here. Making things more difficult is the fact that there are 8 genera in Juglandaceae, and its genus Juglans alone is divided into 4 sections. The Japanese Walnut (J. ailantifolia) isn't too dissimilar, telling me that I'd probably have to run through all of the Juglandaceae Family to know for sure what I have.

For now, I'm going to say it's a black walnut, and be happy :) I suppose I could always send my Flickr set to The Walnut Council and see what they have to say about it. There's a council for everything! Anyway, pretty neat to get a chance to work in walnut this young, though I wouldn't go chopping one down on my own for the opportunity.
I will take your word for it, :=) That's cool that you took the trouble to look into that thanks for the great links are you sure your not a detective?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
mystery ornamental branch identified

After some online snooping, it looks like the branch I found the other day is of the Juglandaceae Family, which is to say it's a walnut. Here's some evidence…

The chambers in the middle, seen here in my sample comprise what is known as a "chambered pith" (a pith being the center of a tree/branch/twig). Here's how it happens (in elaborate, if brief science talk). When it comes to chambered piths, it seems the only two choices spoken of online are black walnut (Juglans nigra), and butternut (Juglans cinerea), aka "white walnut." Here a dichotomous tree terminates in those choices after choosing "chambered pith."

Wikipedia's entry on the walnut tree features this image of the chambered pith of a black walnut. I'm a little iffy on it being a black walnut, however, as some shots, like those found on this page show that while the chambered pith is similar, the wood in that shot seems more woody, and the twig shots seem hairy, whereas my limb was smooth and hairless. However, at this great page on butternut, and its sister page on black walnut, there's a comparison shot of the twigs of both which suggests that if either, I have black walnut. The buds on butternut are pointier and longer, and the leaf scars much larger, with a shape that's elongated more down the stem. Even the author of those pages implies it's not always easy to tell them apart for a novice like me.

There are some more good shots of young butternut twigs here, and they certainly do show some similarities, like the bark color and texture, and the distribution of the little white dots, or "lenticels" (pronounced LEN-tih-kuls), which act as pores to bring oxygen into the growing limb, similar to those found on my silver birch. For reference again, here are my twigs: one, two, and three, with clearer views of the lenticels here and here. In that last one the lenticels are fading, and the trunk right between my fingers seems to be gearing up to split into the more textured, woody bark of older trees.

Here's a shot of black walnut on Flickr that shows more of the transition from young to mature tree. Its buds do look a lot like those on my samples. There's a bit more on butternut, black walnut, and hickory (also in the Juglandaceae Family) here. Making things more difficult is the fact that there are 8 genera in Juglandaceae, and its genus Juglans alone is divided into 4 sections. The Japanese Walnut (J. ailantifolia) isn't too dissimilar, telling me that I'd probably have to run through all of the Juglandaceae Family to know for sure what I have.

For now, I'm going to say it's a black walnut, and be happy :) I suppose I could always send my Flickr set to The Walnut Council and see what they have to say about it. There's a council for everything! Anyway, pretty neat to get a chance to work in walnut this young, though I wouldn't go chopping one down on my own for the opportunity.
Detective indeed, sandhill. Where were you on the night of March 12!?

:)

If it were up to me, there'd be some pretty powerful dichotomous keys with rich photosets for every plant and tree possible online. Perhaps one day it will be up to me, if I keep taking many high resolution photos of each tree I find, posting them, and then doing research.
 
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