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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
I probably spend about half of my time in the workshop doing furniture, boxes, and other conventional woodworking where the primary objective is precise joinery. I spend the other half of my time on the lathe. I enjoy them both but in different ways. On the lathe I feel more like an artist. With conventional woodworking I feel a little more like an engineer.
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
I don't think I could say it any better than Rich… I love being able to manipulate the shape and form at the Lathe at the same time I enjoy the precision of joinery work.
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
My time is the same as Richs, I really love to turn, but people want me to build stuff and to justify the expense of the tools I already have. Turning, is fun, fast, and messy. The artistic and technical aspects are a big draw for me aswell.
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
I brought a mini lathe to Az thie winter and I can spend all my time turning. It is so satisfying to create a new shape and make beautiful gifts to give or sell.
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
I have really been bitten buy the turning bug. Would rather be doing that then any other woodworking. Just can't get enough.

Scrappy
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
I just got my lathe a while back. I'm addicted to it..
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
I find that a lathe is fun, but haven't delved into the deeper and bigger pieces. I'm sure that I'll get there some day.
 

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In the beginning

One of my friends came in one day and threw me a Craft Supply catalog to me. We were talking as I thumbed through the catalog. He asked me if I had ever made pens before and I replied "How do you make pens". It was all over with from there. I started dreaming after reading a few articles and a couple of internet searches. Started buying pen blanks before I even had a lathe. Made a pen press as I was saving for my "Machine". Began my daily search on Craigslist for a used lathe and some tools. After a month or so I found a Jet vs Mini & a bandsaw. A two hour drive and I was set. I stared cranking out pens and little do dads every chance I could. That was two years ago and I find myself standing at the lathe every chance I can. I am not sure why a spinning piece of wood intrigues me so much. I guess it could be the first time you apply finish and the grain just "Pops" at you showing the beauty you have unlocked. It could be the time alone with no one but you to control the shape and the outcome of the final of the project you are working on. I do like the reaction of people when you give them something you have turned and they always say, "You made this?". Then there are the shapes, too much here and not enough there can make a man cry, I never knew a 1/16 of an inch made such a difference. I just keep trying for perfection with a smile on my face as the learning process continues.

Time for some shavings…..........
Turning can be very addictive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Why Turn #2

A little more history. After I received my lathe (Jet Mini) I started cranking out Pens and do dads on a daily basis. I wanted to do more but I could only do so much with pen blanks. I knew I was hooked on turning when I started looking at wood in a different way. Driving around I now looked for anything I could turn. Anytime I heard a chain saw I went to see what they were cutting up. Tree trimmers were becoming my best friends. Now that I had some bigger pieces of wood I wanted to learn how to do bowls. Started doing some internet searches to see what I could come up with. I found a local chapter of the AAW the "Channel Islands Woodturners" and attended one of their meetings. What a great group of guys. They have mentors in the club that are more than willing to "Lend a helping hand" and teach you everything you ever wanted to know. At one of the "Demo's" I filmed from the back and made a video of the project. They really like it and wondered if I would do their filming at all of the demos. Of course I said yes and that was two years ago. The club purchased a new video camera and already had two 42 inch monitors with stands and a sound system. I get to stand right up front at all of the demos and have met some really great turners. Jimmy Clewes, Alan Batty, Christian Delhon, Mike Schular, Steve Dunn, Eli Avisera and others. I have learned so much from the group and it has diffidently cut down on the learning time. I try to turn on a daily basis, rough out a bowl blank, do some sort of box or just make shavings it really does not matter to me. I am currently obsessed with the Calabash bowl design. I go to sleep and wake up thinking about the shape, draw it at meetings when I am supposed to be paying attention you know the drill. So "Why Turn", I like being in control on the final shape and product.

Time for some shavings…...
 

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Why Turn #2

A little more history. After I received my lathe (Jet Mini) I started cranking out Pens and do dads on a daily basis. I wanted to do more but I could only do so much with pen blanks. I knew I was hooked on turning when I started looking at wood in a different way. Driving around I now looked for anything I could turn. Anytime I heard a chain saw I went to see what they were cutting up. Tree trimmers were becoming my best friends. Now that I had some bigger pieces of wood I wanted to learn how to do bowls. Started doing some internet searches to see what I could come up with. I found a local chapter of the AAW the "Channel Islands Woodturners" and attended one of their meetings. What a great group of guys. They have mentors in the club that are more than willing to "Lend a helping hand" and teach you everything you ever wanted to know. At one of the "Demo's" I filmed from the back and made a video of the project. They really like it and wondered if I would do their filming at all of the demos. Of course I said yes and that was two years ago. The club purchased a new video camera and already had two 42 inch monitors with stands and a sound system. I get to stand right up front at all of the demos and have met some really great turners. Jimmy Clewes, Alan Batty, Christian Delhon, Mike Schular, Steve Dunn, Eli Avisera and others. I have learned so much from the group and it has diffidently cut down on the learning time. I try to turn on a daily basis, rough out a bowl blank, do some sort of box or just make shavings it really does not matter to me. I am currently obsessed with the Calabash bowl design. I go to sleep and wake up thinking about the shape, draw it at meetings when I am supposed to be paying attention you know the drill. So "Why Turn", I like being in control on the final shape and product.

Time for some shavings…...
I am the same way about logs/chainsaws. Now that I have a band large enough to cut them up nicely I'm set. I really need to hook up with the local turning group. I have gotten OK but I think I could use some guidance for bowls, etc.

btw Welcome to LumberJocks.!
 

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Why Turn #2

A little more history. After I received my lathe (Jet Mini) I started cranking out Pens and do dads on a daily basis. I wanted to do more but I could only do so much with pen blanks. I knew I was hooked on turning when I started looking at wood in a different way. Driving around I now looked for anything I could turn. Anytime I heard a chain saw I went to see what they were cutting up. Tree trimmers were becoming my best friends. Now that I had some bigger pieces of wood I wanted to learn how to do bowls. Started doing some internet searches to see what I could come up with. I found a local chapter of the AAW the "Channel Islands Woodturners" and attended one of their meetings. What a great group of guys. They have mentors in the club that are more than willing to "Lend a helping hand" and teach you everything you ever wanted to know. At one of the "Demo's" I filmed from the back and made a video of the project. They really like it and wondered if I would do their filming at all of the demos. Of course I said yes and that was two years ago. The club purchased a new video camera and already had two 42 inch monitors with stands and a sound system. I get to stand right up front at all of the demos and have met some really great turners. Jimmy Clewes, Alan Batty, Christian Delhon, Mike Schular, Steve Dunn, Eli Avisera and others. I have learned so much from the group and it has diffidently cut down on the learning time. I try to turn on a daily basis, rough out a bowl blank, do some sort of box or just make shavings it really does not matter to me. I am currently obsessed with the Calabash bowl design. I go to sleep and wake up thinking about the shape, draw it at meetings when I am supposed to be paying attention you know the drill. So "Why Turn", I like being in control on the final shape and product.

Time for some shavings…...
So lets see some of your turnings.
 

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Why Turn #2

A little more history. After I received my lathe (Jet Mini) I started cranking out Pens and do dads on a daily basis. I wanted to do more but I could only do so much with pen blanks. I knew I was hooked on turning when I started looking at wood in a different way. Driving around I now looked for anything I could turn. Anytime I heard a chain saw I went to see what they were cutting up. Tree trimmers were becoming my best friends. Now that I had some bigger pieces of wood I wanted to learn how to do bowls. Started doing some internet searches to see what I could come up with. I found a local chapter of the AAW the "Channel Islands Woodturners" and attended one of their meetings. What a great group of guys. They have mentors in the club that are more than willing to "Lend a helping hand" and teach you everything you ever wanted to know. At one of the "Demo's" I filmed from the back and made a video of the project. They really like it and wondered if I would do their filming at all of the demos. Of course I said yes and that was two years ago. The club purchased a new video camera and already had two 42 inch monitors with stands and a sound system. I get to stand right up front at all of the demos and have met some really great turners. Jimmy Clewes, Alan Batty, Christian Delhon, Mike Schular, Steve Dunn, Eli Avisera and others. I have learned so much from the group and it has diffidently cut down on the learning time. I try to turn on a daily basis, rough out a bowl blank, do some sort of box or just make shavings it really does not matter to me. I am currently obsessed with the Calabash bowl design. I go to sleep and wake up thinking about the shape, draw it at meetings when I am supposed to be paying attention you know the drill. So "Why Turn", I like being in control on the final shape and product.

Time for some shavings…...
Some photos would be good
 
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