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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Lookin good!
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
There is only one solution here my friend. Take away her car. Knowing that would be suicidal I strongly suggest a compromise. An addition to what you have there as a garage could be done, but if that is not feasible then you will have to do the unthinkable. But that is not going to happen either. Let me ponder this for awhile and if I can come up with anything worthwhile I will drop you a line. But in the meantime. Happy New Yearl and God Bless you and yours. :)
Ps. I love what you have done in a minimal space. Great job.
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Looks good. I still need to make all the hangers for my garage. I can sympathize with the time consuming part of making the holders
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
great use of those cleats ,
make some cabinets or some big furniture quick ,
take up as much room for assembly as you can ,
when asked , say it's for the next anniversary present for her ,
and then take your time , doing it right ,
hopefully she will be so happy ,
she will let you keep the space ?
or build her her own garage ?
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Looks really great!
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
REally nice looking shop!
It is so neat and clean… are you sure you really use it????
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Great Job Dave, you just have to love French cleats, The best is being able to re-arrange the tools as your collection grows. Bruce
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Hooray!!
No more peg board!

Good job there David. I like your selection of tools.

-Peter
 
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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Looking good!
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Next your wife will complain about sawdust on her car. But what should she expect when she parks in your sawdust factory?

Looks like a fantastic setup

-jeremy
 

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Moving the Hand Tools In...Installing A French Cleat System

So, I spent all summer building a barn, so I can move all the junk out of my garage, so I can buy a real cabinet saw, jointer, band saw, and drill press and have the room to leave them all reasonably set up so I don't have to do the Harlem Shuffle every time I want to use a tool…(whew!) And wouldn't you know it…the wife wants to park her car in the middle of my shop. More about that later…much later! So, I bought my Unisaw and built my out feed table

So now I need to move all my hand tools and stuff into the new shop area. I was thinking of putting up peg board but thats a pain in the ass and I never liked the way you have to put in the metal hooks and they always come out with the tool. I recently watched a video over at The Woodwhisperes' site where he talked about using French cleat systems to hang up all his stuff. So I figured I would give it a try. First I built a shelf and a short section of wall cleat for my table saw accessories


The shelf is just a piece of 3/4" ply with a Western red Cedar edging around it, and the French cleat on the back and on the wall.

The shelf is really strong and secure and it was so easy to hang it using the French cleat. I then made custom hangers for each item I wanted to hang from the upper section. Mostly just pieces of ply cut at the proper angle with either a dowel in it or a custom made piece of hardwood to support a tool like the machine square. My taper jig is laying on the concrete knee wall, but I will install a few dowels in the underside of the shelf support face to hang it from.
Here are some shots of the main wall area where most of my hand tools will live
looking from behind my saw…

The main wall




The wall sections of the cleats go up fast and then it's a little time consuming making all the little hangers for each tool you want to put on the cleat. Here are a few close up shots showing some of my hangers and holders I made..










As you can see, it's really relatively simple. I found I ran out of room pretty quick, I will be putting up more on another wall. I just wanted to get enough up so I can get all my essential tools where i need them to be. They used to be all inside my basement and I would have to walk back and forth every time I needed something, then schlep them all back when I was done…very time consuming. So far it's like a godsend to need a mallet or a chisel and to be able to just take two steps to get it is so nice! Overall I love the whole French cleat thing. The greatest thing is it's so simple to move things around. I was shuffling things back and forth the whole time I was building it….and I will probably never stop! The shelves work really well and they are easy to make…just some ply screwed together in an "L" and a French cleat screwed to the back. Another great thing is I was able to use up a bunch of small hardwood scraps I had laying around that would probably have just gotten burned in the fire pit!

So after I had been working in the garage for a few days I noticed how low the light level was. Just a screw in bulb fixture in the ceiling and a lamp and one hanging 40 watt shop lite. I was having trouble seeing what I was doing at the table saw. So I went to Home Depot and picked up a two bulb T-8 35 watt fluorescent fixture for $18.00! You can screw it right to the ceiling, it has a tiny little ballast that guarantees it will start down to -10 degrees. A pack of two bulbs was around $4, and I bought a two dollar extension cord to wire a plug onto it..total cost 24.00!

Eventually I want to put up like at least four or five more and wire them into a sub panel I will be installing …but for now I might buy a couple more and just wire them all into the bulb socket….the T-8 fixtures don't draw allot of juice, very green! So now that my tools are in, the next thing to tackle will be getting rid of my door across two saw horses and build a real bench!
Always remember the three basic rules for a happy life;
1. Keep your wife happy
2. Keep your sisters happy
3. There are no exceptions to 1 and 2
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
 

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Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
Looks great! I like the sliding french cleat idea. When I was first looking at the pictures I thought the dust collection hood was going to get in the way during angle cuts. (Then I actually read your notes.) :)
 

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Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
Great detail on how you put it all together. I am getting my equip and building together so all the ideas i can get are appreciated. Will definately keep this one in mind.
 

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Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
Love the setup and might have to do something similar. I second the Kreg support. I have one of their miter gauges that I dropped and broke the cursor. I emailed them and they immediately sent one out without charging me a dime.
 

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Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
Looks good. Great mind must think alike! I have the same brand saw and stop system. I did something similer to yours if you care to look in my projects. Thanks for posting.

God Bless
tom
 

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Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
Looks great! So nice and clean too. I always try to keep my stuff inside some sort of enclosure so that it is easier to keep clean. I was thinking some kind of box/cabinet/over-shelf storage thingy behind the fence would keep the fine dust easier to manage. Of course then you have to remember what is in there.

Steve
 

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Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
Looks good to me, I too am making my one car garage into my shop. Space is definitly at a premium. But cant wait it will be bigger than anything I have ever had.
 

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Kreg Top Track Production Stop/Chop Saw Outfeed Table/Fence

I recently got a great deal on a Kreg precision measuring kit at wood shop liquidation sale. I was considering buying the kit brand new for $140 bucks… I got this one for $25, but it was missing all the hardware. I sent an email to Kreg explaining my situation and asking if they could sell me the replacement parts and they promptly answered back saying they would send me out all the hardware I was missing for free! I can't say enough great things about Kreg and their customer service. A week later I received a package containing all the hardware I was missing and one each of the left and right reading self adhesive tapes. I didn't even ask him for those..you can buy them anywhere…but he included them anyways! Awesome!Thanks to the great customer service rep at Kreg!

So I decided I was going to build a simple out feed table out of 2×4's screwed to the wall studs and 2×4 legs. I topped it with 3/4" shop birch and 1/8" hardboard. I used a light coating of contact adhesive so I can change out the hardboard if it gets all messed up. I kept the chopsaw on the cabinet I made for it, and once in the position I wanted it in I locked all the wheels and shimmed it so it is level. The out feed table legs nearest to the cabinet I turned so the long side is facing the cabinet. I drilled holes and installed 3/8" x 2 1/2" lag bolts and washers to lock the two together. I made the fence from 3/4" melamine for the face and 3/4" birch for the base, pocket screwed together. The fence is 2 1/4" high per the Kreg specs for the stops to work right. Here is the finished fence before I mounted the track to it..

It's screwed to the table top with 1 1/2" pan head screws. The top track is attached to the fence with #8×5/8" pan head screws. It's pretty easy to dial in the tape placement and the curser of the stop..in a couple minutes and a few test cuts I had it dialed in as accurate as my Biesmeyer!








I also threw together a dust hood for my chop saw. I made it out of scrap hard board, scrap MDF, and scrap 1/2" Baltic birch.

I used a table top dust collection fixture mounted under the box. I mounted it to the wall on a french cleat that way I can slide it to the left to do angle cuts. It works pretty good at sucking up most of the dust…..allot better than no hood. I also used some pool hose to direct the saws built in dust collection port down into the collector.


My little shop is starting to come together! I will probably put up a piece of solid wood trim on the front of the out feed table. I have allot of storage behind the fence and I will be putting up more french cleat storage and maybe a cabinet as well. It's a bit of a reach over the wide counter top but I am tall so It's not too bad. Next on my list is a real bench to replace the door on two saw horses I have now! Also I want to make a nice drill press table with a movable fence.
Brad- Nice job on the miter saw station. I need to do something similar for support and dust collection for mine. Stop system would be nice to have for repeatable length cuts.
 
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