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I don't get it. Quartersawn refers to the angle at which the board was sawn out of the tree, right? Is there no such thing as qtrswn cherry? Oh, and while I'm at it, am I just cheap or is wood expensive? Depending on the species and thickness, one could pay anywhere from $4 to $10 per board foot. Your average bookcase would have several hundred dollars of wood in it. Am I alone on this?
 

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Hey Chuck
!/4 swan wood is more stable but in many cases it's appearance is very special so it's both. Depending were you are there are many species available in quarter swan.
 

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Oh man, you can get almost anything quartersawn if you go to the right mill, The guy I go to has beech, maple, poplar, white oak, hickory and a few other species on hand all the time, they QS about everything because of the stability benefits.
 

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I'd love to get any Brazilian rosewood since, as I understand it, it is illegal in Brazil to export it. I've worked with a lot of different rosewoods but never a Brazilian rosewood.
 

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Wood is expensive, and get's more expensive every day. I wish I'd have stocked up 25 years ago when I started woodworking. One way to cut costs is to use veneer, although that's not exactly cheap either.
If you think $10 is expensive, I've seen wood for $20-$30/bd ft.

20 years ago, I built a guitar from a single piece of quilted maple. I paid $75 for it. I saw a similar piece go for $375 on Ebay the other day.
 

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So the things I do to work around the price of wood:

1. Use veneers and plywood, with the design such that I've got real wood at a reasonable thickness on the edges and for visible structural stuff (like this). Legs happen with real wood, but if I can possibly use plywood for a carcase I will. Of course if I use a really nice plywood, that doesn't save me too much…

2. Find cool sources for interesting lumber. Watch craigslist materials: I've gotten a whole bunch of Massaranduba (among other places, used on the entrance to my house and a lighted glass plate frame) and Ipe from the seconds/scrap pile at a local high end decking place; Peruvian Mahogany as box beams from a remodel re-decided (cost a little extra 'cause I missed a few nails and dinged a blade when disassembling them, they're becoming baseboards and cabinet door panels); and a whole bunch of eastern hard maple from a company that makes stamp handles, and they can't use the lumber at the heart/sap interface, which I think looks more interesting! Join your local woodworking club: Recently one of our club's meetings was at Luthier's Mercantile, which got me the opportunity to buy stuff from their rejects bin, which resulted in a whole passel of bookmatches that are a little thin, but will make good door panels or drawer fronts.
 

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Again, being stuck on an island is expensive. You guys are complaining about $10 B/F wood! I'd kill to get some that cheap. I bought some plain old walnut last week that was $14 bd ft. Most wood around here is in the $20-30 range.

Moving back to the mainland is going to make buying wood a hell of a lot less painful.
 

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Hey Captain Wooden Soldier, Sir!

First, bellyaching about island life in Hawai'i? I should live so hard. The solution to your over-priced wood problem may require the services of a Command Seargent Major, but I guarantee you know a good one. Have him lay on a TDY to Kentucky, Tennessee, or North Carolina, or Virginia, whilst fulfilling your duty, scope out the wood scene, buy what you need, and have the CSM secret it with "research material" for the mission, get you on a Herky-Bird or C-17 and back to Oahu. They'll even supply forklifts, transport, and enlisted help to unload and stash. Be all You Can BE, SON. And sincere thanks for your service. This taxpayer wouldn't mind a bit if such a mission improved morale and therefore made you a more effective leader-of-men.
Stay safe and healthy. We need guys like you. And Happy Memorial Day.

Steve
 

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Ha, thanks, Fussy. I did a stint as an executive officer and I had some pretty good connections but unfortunately the Army doesn't deal much in exotic hardwoods.
The only place it's harder to find wood is in Iraq!
 

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If you are buying from the lumber yard it is going to be expensive. If you have mill around you it is alot cheaper. Especially if you can get a good repore going with him.
 

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You have to look for good deals mostly - lots of folks clear their land and sell to small millers who will sell the wood for a much better price. Wood is definitely not cheap though. You also need to be stingy on how you cut and configure your projects….Like stated above, use cheap woods for frames and hidden areas. Also, use of vaneers can reduce the costs and spice up a project quite nicely. As for quartersawn, I have seen almost every wood available as quartersawn except, perhaps, some of the more exotic hardwoods that are milled in the jungles or rainforests.
 

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WoodenSoldier, how about driftwood on the beach or is it at a premium? Take some leave and go the northwest and stock up. Lots of redwood, I hear. I was always told that the Army regulations book had a soft cover and was very flexible.
I knew a green Beret stationed in Hawaii in the late 60's. He said it was nice but after two weeks, he wanted to go somewhere where he could climb higher ground and see more land (he was from eastern Kentucky mountains). He also said the Hawaiians went to the mainland for vacations.
BTW, thanks for your service!
 

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For sure find a small mill! the guy i use sells me QSWO for 1.25 a BDFT. you cant beat that with a pushstick! at least i dont think you can haha. cherry usually runs about .85 a BDFT and so on. i gotta pay him to plane to thickness for me though, 25 bucks a load i would have paid for a planer by now :eek:(
 

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I get my wood from a sawmill, which is definitely the way to go. (Also, love the suggestions earlier - craigslist, people clearing property) . Definitely worth the expensive to invest in a planer, because the cheaper wood is usually rough looking. But the only difference between that rough lumber and the really pretty stuff at the expensive place is a planer…

It took some digging, but I was able to find over 15 sawmills within easy driving distance of me. Granted I live in a heavily wooded area, if you live in the desert it is going to be more difficult :)
 

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I get my lumber from a sawmill and I have a plane and jointer so I get their scrap. Some will be split or warped and some might be spalted:)-) but I get a truck load for $15.00. Most of it I can use for something. Right now I have walnut, cherry,red oak, maple, spalted ash, hickory, and some I can't name right now.
 
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