LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,319 Posts
I have a project I am looking at and I need some red colored wood. It will be exposed but will remain indoors.

I am looking at redheart, bloodwood and Chakte Kok (redwood will be too soft).

Which of those would maintain their color best?

Is there another red colored wood that I haven't thought of?

I would hate to have to dye something red, but at least I know it would take a lot to make it darken or fade.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,061 Posts
Gary stay away from red heart It will turn brown (I have alot of it) ! I also have Bloodwood and hands down would go with Bloodwood Its alot harder and has a great shimmer/chatoyant attributes.
I made a guitar stand (I'll Be posting soon) out of Bloodwood and very white tiger stripped maple a fews years ago and its still the same color as the day I made it !!
Like you said Redwood is too soft and will turn dark red after a finish is applied .
Paduak In my oppion is more orange/red and in time will change color to a brownish ..not as bad as redheart though!
I've never worked with Chakte Kok… I just looked it up here's some info on it … It sounds like it has a lot of the same characteristics as Redheart . http://wiki.bmezine.com/index.php?title=Chakte_Kok&redirect=no

I love Bloodwood I just wish it didn't cost so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
IMHO - No matter what you use if you don't want it to "turn brown" coat it with a UV (Ultra Violet) resistant finish like Spar Varnish that is made for the outdoors when wood is exposed to the sun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,760 Posts
gary ,
i'm with the bloodwood .
i have had one twisted board for 10 years in my exotics stash ,
it's the easyest to spot , it stays red , with no finish .

happy birthday to the wife today !
you two enjoy .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I would agree with bloodwood with padauk as a second choice. I also agree with John Gray that a UV inhibitor will keep the color more vibrant. I have heard that Armor All works well on the bare wood prior to finish, but I haven't use it personally. Would need to test it for compatability with your finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,391 Posts
+1 Bloodwood gets the vote for natural real redness.
I guess it depends on the red you are looking for though. Mahogany treated with Potassium Dichromate has a wonderful long lasting kind of reddishness to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
I've had pretty good luck with blloodwood staying fairly red but it's wood and it's going to turn a little bit browner than when you first cut it. How much wood are we talking about and does it need to be wood? Just something for inlay? Maybe solid red corian?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
From: http://www.a1-wood-flooring.com/exotic-hardwoods.htm

Chakte-kok -The coloring of this lightweight wood can easily fade from an attractive red to a muddy orange or yellow-brown. It grows in the areas from Southern Mexico to Southern Brazil. Also known as "Gateado," "Dominican mahogany," "Cuban mahogany," and "Jamaica mahogany."

Bloodwood - This is a durable, resistant wood with coloring ranging from red to deep brown. Bloodwood grows in Brazil and is also referred to as "Muirapiranga," "Satine Rubane," and "Cardinal Wood." Blue Gum - The color of the heartwood of blue gum ranges from brown to deep red, while the sapwood is lighter. It grows in Australia and is very hard and moderately durable.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top