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Like many, my shop is my garage. So, I'm cramped for space and as a result, everything is on wheels. Most of the roller platforms, I build myself; torsion boxes. I started off with the generic wheels from the big box stores. They aren't wheels so much as they're spikes. So, I "upgraded" to the wheels from Woodcraft. They were great for a while, but now I've started suffering blowouts where the treads separate from the wheel. What's aggravating is that I'm not exceeding the load specs on the wheels.

My question: Has anyone found both a good, long lasting wheel and a decent source for them?

Thanks in advance everyone.
 

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I thought the Woodcraft casters were supposed to be really good. They're definitely expensive.

I've been using Great Lakes Caster for my caster needs recently. Really good prices and just about any type of caster you'd want.
 

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I always find random things such as rolling carts that people throw out in the allyways. Then I just pull out my portable electric drill and remove them there on site. Never had anyone complain as it's all going into a dumpster anyway.
If you don't have time for that, hit up Harbor Freight Tools if you have one in your neck of the woods. The two close by my place always has a good assortment in stock.
Also, check out the Goodwill /Salvation Army /St. Vincent DePaul; I always find the little Ziplock baggies with four wheels for like $1 or $2.
Yup, great secret hidey-holes!! Shhhhhh… :p
 

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Grainger is also a good caster resource, and they often have caster stuff on sale. They also sell floor locks.

However: wheels might be an oversell here. I wonder if there are some tools in your shop that are light enough that they would easily slide out if they just had four little squares of 1/4" thick UHMW countersunk and screwed onto the bottom of your torsion boxes. This can be purchased at a plastics supply place.

Some of my stuff that doesn't get scooted much lives on those little nylon glides about the diameter of a quarter and that are molded around a nail. I just use plenty of them and when they wear out from the friction on the concrete, I yank the nails and reapply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Late update… The Woodcraft casters are junk. Save yourself some aggravation and don't buy them. If you're like me, you put something on wheels to make it easy to move. But, once it's loaded, it becomes a real pain to replace a wheel because of a blown tread. I'll post some pics later to show what's happening.

I even made torsion boxes as cabinet platforms to make sure the weight was evenly distributed on the casters. Although the torsion boxes added a little weight, I still haven't exceeded the weight specks on the wheels if the weight can be summed up as a distributed load limit. If on the other hand, the loads can't be summed up, then it was my fault, but the wheels are worthless to me in that case.

PurpLev, I looked at your blog entry about the wheels. I'm going to look into them. How long have you had them in service and how have they held up? Also, what would you estimate the weight as being? Thanks for the update!!!
 

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That's interesting. I wonder if they've made any changes? or if they have more than one type? I know that one key is to use polyurethane instead of rubber because rubber gets flat spots. That was my main consideration. It sounds like PurpLev had some really good luck with his purchase. I'm thinking about trying that next, but shipping sounds steep.
 
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