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I think I might have asked this here before but anyway.My son Alistair gave me an old deadweight LOL cast iron table saw.It has currently by good design which has allowed it to been taken to about four or five large pieces for transporting it . It is a good saw belt driven but old. I don't like the fact that the sawblade approx 12 inches cannot be positioned either up or down.This brought about by way of( I feel) a poor design I have never seen this before even on old saws. Maybe this was accpetable in former times. Although now even though I work as a hobbiest alone,I am not thrilled by this.
I thought of redesigning it and making the top slit wider and fitting a disc so that it could be used as a disc sander even up to sixteen inch disc. Is this a good idea in your opinion? Or before I get started does anyone have a better idea for it's future use??? Alistair
 

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I've seen a few table saws with a fixed positon blade.. usually larger saws that were used in production furniture shops where precision was critical. Not having to deal with any slop via the tilt/height mechanisms allowed very close tolerances and dead accurate cuts. For a hobbiest/home workshop environment, it is definately overkill. Post them pictures.. would be interesting to identify the beast.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Sounds like it's time to sell it, to me… Unless you have the space to hold the antique… I doubt if it will appreciate in value… but, I don't know.

Just make sure your son understands Why… LOL

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I will tyry to post pictures soon, but you do realise it is currently in four or five pieces in my machining shop. In which case that could be a problem. I will do what I can do?
Many thanks so far guys ,it's as said an oldy. Alistair
 

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If all you're doing is through cuts a blade can
generally be left at full height. The geometry
of the teeth is such that they are more vertical
in their presentation is closer to vertical, like
a band saw sort of and better for cutting all
the way through thick material. In production
cabinet work on large panel saws melamine sheets
are cut 4 or more simultaneously this way
as well. I don't cut more than one layer
most of the time, but having more capacity
can increase working efficiency.
 

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It would be interesting to see how old a saw it is. Is there a manufacturer's name on it? The oldest machines I have seen was at an auction of an old lumberyard, they had a set of machines that ran off a shaft that ran overhead. They all had flat belt pullys, and you tightened the belt for the machine you wanted to run. So they all ran off a single motor. Had heard of that type of machine setups where they were powered by water along a stream using a water wheel.
 

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It would be interesting to see how old a saw it is. Is there a manufacturer s name on it? The oldest machines I have seen was at an auction of an old lumberyard, they had a set of machines that ran off a shaft that ran overhead. They all had flat belt pullys, and you tightened the belt for the machine you wanted to run. So they all ran off a single motor. Had heard of that type of machine setups where they were powered by water along a stream using a water wheel.

- buildingmonkey
In WNY many of the craftsmen in the Amish Community still use this method. Many have small diesel engines outside their shops to run the overhead main shaft.
 
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