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I had some 2×6 that I build a raised garden bed with. They are untreated and sat in the weather for about 6 months. We are moving so I had to pull them out and the boards looked pretty decent a couple of them were very full of moisture but some seemed still solid.

Is there anyway to let them dry out and be able to cut out or plane out the bad parts and make the boards useable again?
 

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Construction lumber is going to twist like crazy as it dries, I'd say you'd be good for another raised bed application if yu rebuild it pretty quick. Wood will take near a year per inch to dry in air stack not sure the lumber yuve got wiud be worth the work
 

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The "year per inch" rule is a very poor rule that still exists to this day due to old timers and people who have no experience with drying lumber. Under warm dry windy conditions you can air dry fresh sawn 4/4 pine in 2-3 months down to 12% moisture. Thats actually lower than it is typically kiln dried to. Softer hardwoods can be dried in months while a hardwood like White Oak might take a couple of years. Like I said, the year per inch rule is a poor rule.

Long story short, put your boards in a warm dry environment. Lean them up against the wall in your basement or woodshop, but dont put a fan on them. Its all but impossible to dry softwood too quickly. You'll probably get a little warping. When it stops getting lighter in weight then you know its dry, or just wait a month or so. This time of year our homes are very dry, like 30% humidity, and that will give you a moisture content of around 6% if you leave it there long enough, which is more than dry enough to work with. The stuff you buy from the lumber yard is probably at least 15% or more.
 

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PT takes a long time to dry out and you don't want that surrounding your veggie bed. Bad for cell structure. Framing lumber on the ground and filled with soil can be expected to last about 5 to 8 yrs before insects and weather beat it down to where your screws and or lags will begin sliding out brackets will hold the corners together longer than lags alone. I also suggest you place and screw a 2X4 low to hold the sides together it'll help when tilling and shoveling for spuds.
 
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