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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
headboard and footboard

Well,
A few month ago I learned that I'm going to be a dad. Like many others here, I decided to build a crib. I'm a little worried that I won't finish everything in time, but I'm doing the best I can. I just finished painting the room today, so hopefully I can work on the crib a bit tomorrow afternoon. I took a couple pictures of where I stand right now.

I am doing some dry fitting so the lacewood already has an amber shellac finish (floating panel) and the walnut will get a danish oil finish covered with sealcoat shellac, but it isn't on there yet. The original plan was to use birdseye maple instead of lacewood, but I just couldn't afford it. I'm still happy with the look (maybe happier, I hear birdseye can be a bear to work with and I'm behind schedule as is, so maybe its best to have one less thing to work on).

Anyway, here are the photos. Some with flash, some without. Hopefully you can see the pictures nicely.









One thing I learned is that my bandsaw only has a 4 inch resaw capacity (riserblocks are not an option). I had to use a table saw and handsaw to resaw the lacewood in an effort to get bookmatched panels. Becuase of the blade thickness, the bookmatching is anything but perfect. I ended up with one reasonably good side, but the opposite side doesn't look bookmatched at all. It still looks interesting though. Just thought I'd share my learning experience on this aspect.
 

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headboard and footboard

Well,
A few month ago I learned that I'm going to be a dad. Like many others here, I decided to build a crib. I'm a little worried that I won't finish everything in time, but I'm doing the best I can. I just finished painting the room today, so hopefully I can work on the crib a bit tomorrow afternoon. I took a couple pictures of where I stand right now.

I am doing some dry fitting so the lacewood already has an amber shellac finish (floating panel) and the walnut will get a danish oil finish covered with sealcoat shellac, but it isn't on there yet. The original plan was to use birdseye maple instead of lacewood, but I just couldn't afford it. I'm still happy with the look (maybe happier, I hear birdseye can be a bear to work with and I'm behind schedule as is, so maybe its best to have one less thing to work on).

Anyway, here are the photos. Some with flash, some without. Hopefully you can see the pictures nicely.









One thing I learned is that my bandsaw only has a 4 inch resaw capacity (riserblocks are not an option). I had to use a table saw and handsaw to resaw the lacewood in an effort to get bookmatched panels. Becuase of the blade thickness, the bookmatching is anything but perfect. I ended up with one reasonably good side, but the opposite side doesn't look bookmatched at all. It still looks interesting though. Just thought I'd share my learning experience on this aspect.
Great job. Keep plugging away. You might just make it.
 

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551 Posts
headboard and footboard

Well,
A few month ago I learned that I'm going to be a dad. Like many others here, I decided to build a crib. I'm a little worried that I won't finish everything in time, but I'm doing the best I can. I just finished painting the room today, so hopefully I can work on the crib a bit tomorrow afternoon. I took a couple pictures of where I stand right now.

I am doing some dry fitting so the lacewood already has an amber shellac finish (floating panel) and the walnut will get a danish oil finish covered with sealcoat shellac, but it isn't on there yet. The original plan was to use birdseye maple instead of lacewood, but I just couldn't afford it. I'm still happy with the look (maybe happier, I hear birdseye can be a bear to work with and I'm behind schedule as is, so maybe its best to have one less thing to work on).

Anyway, here are the photos. Some with flash, some without. Hopefully you can see the pictures nicely.









One thing I learned is that my bandsaw only has a 4 inch resaw capacity (riserblocks are not an option). I had to use a table saw and handsaw to resaw the lacewood in an effort to get bookmatched panels. Becuase of the blade thickness, the bookmatching is anything but perfect. I ended up with one reasonably good side, but the opposite side doesn't look bookmatched at all. It still looks interesting though. Just thought I'd share my learning experience on this aspect.
Thats going to be great! you will make it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Status Update

Well, I'm about 3 months past my deadline to finish the crib I've been building. I was planning to shoot some photos with some status updates when I had a router mishap. I was routing channels for the gate slides to rest in and the router jumped and ran accross the leg on the headboard. This was the point when I got fed up and quit for the day. At this point, I can't disassemble and rebuild because of my timeline, so I'll have to accept it and move on.

I did run out to sears and pick up an edge guide (As opposed to a poorly adapted centering jig I was trying to use). I'm not sure if this will work well, but I'd love to hear about other people's experience using simple edge guides. It is pretty hard to screw up when using one of these? Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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Status Update

Well, I'm about 3 months past my deadline to finish the crib I've been building. I was planning to shoot some photos with some status updates when I had a router mishap. I was routing channels for the gate slides to rest in and the router jumped and ran accross the leg on the headboard. This was the point when I got fed up and quit for the day. At this point, I can't disassemble and rebuild because of my timeline, so I'll have to accept it and move on.

I did run out to sears and pick up an edge guide (As opposed to a poorly adapted centering jig I was trying to use). I'm not sure if this will work well, but I'd love to hear about other people's experience using simple edge guides. It is pretty hard to screw up when using one of these? Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks!
I've used one on my little laminate trimmer for a few things, and it was pretty easy. The thing that comes to mind with the router jumping out is maybe you were making deep cuts? Several passes of shallow depth will mean less wood removal per depth, and less chance of a big catch and jump.

What a pain, though. Sorry to hear about that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Status Update

Well, I'm about 3 months past my deadline to finish the crib I've been building. I was planning to shoot some photos with some status updates when I had a router mishap. I was routing channels for the gate slides to rest in and the router jumped and ran accross the leg on the headboard. This was the point when I got fed up and quit for the day. At this point, I can't disassemble and rebuild because of my timeline, so I'll have to accept it and move on.

I did run out to sears and pick up an edge guide (As opposed to a poorly adapted centering jig I was trying to use). I'm not sure if this will work well, but I'd love to hear about other people's experience using simple edge guides. It is pretty hard to screw up when using one of these? Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks!
Thanks Gary. I don't think I was going too deep (maybe 1/16th"). I think it was more driven by the jig I was trying to use. I was using the centering jig from one of my project posts. I needed to gut the dowels VERY short to get it to work. I guess I went too short. Combine that with a 3/4" bit that probably wants to move around and I got problems.

I'm feeling better about it now, because it is out of the way, but still. I'll chalk it up to a learning experience.
 

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Status Update

Well, I'm about 3 months past my deadline to finish the crib I've been building. I was planning to shoot some photos with some status updates when I had a router mishap. I was routing channels for the gate slides to rest in and the router jumped and ran accross the leg on the headboard. This was the point when I got fed up and quit for the day. At this point, I can't disassemble and rebuild because of my timeline, so I'll have to accept it and move on.

I did run out to sears and pick up an edge guide (As opposed to a poorly adapted centering jig I was trying to use). I'm not sure if this will work well, but I'd love to hear about other people's experience using simple edge guides. It is pretty hard to screw up when using one of these? Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks!
Becareful out there even with a new guide
 
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