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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
 

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WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
I am looking forward to seeing this tablesaw finished.

Question: What type of media do they blast it with? TV? Radio?

I am assuming if they are going to "blast" it they must be using a stereo, right? Does the type of music make a difference?

I am just full of questions, I may have to Google "media blasting."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
Todd….......I believe that it is a group of pacific islanders and they have informed me that with the installation of a 12-14" subwoofer and 5000W the paint and rust should just fall off….....lol
In all fairness I believe it is crushed walnut shells.
 

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WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
Ken, I recently finished a WT bandsaw of the same vintage. I found the castings to be pretty rough so used an epoxy based primer to hide many of the blemishes. Enjoy the rebuild - well worth the effort espcially when it has family history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
After getting the saw apart I am amazed that the castings, the trunnions especially, are in really good shape. I attribute that to our very dry climate and the fact they were coated with sawdust. In fact, I am not going to paint the trunnions at all, they cleanup up well with a wire brush and solvent.
 

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WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
why host pictures at photo bucket if you can't keep them up there.
I know it's over 3 years old, but people still like to look at the pictures.
 

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WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
So I am looking to buy this saw. It looks to be in good shape and has the original 1 hp motor.

My question is this: is the motor powerful enough to comfortably cut 6/4 and 8/4 hardwood? I don't anticipate doing this very often, but I when I need to do it, I'd like to be confident the saw can do it.

Floyd
 

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WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
why host pictures at photo bucket if you can t keep them up there.
I know it s over 3 years old, but people still like to look at the pictures.

- mrbreezeet1
^ +1, I was unable to see the picture(s)
 

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WT table saw, cabinet clean up

I recently acquired a Walker Turner TA1180B 10" table saw from my MIL. It was owned by her father who used it to build their home in the 1940's.

I have completely disassembled the saw and everything has come apart without much difficulty. There is some minor surface rust on the cabinet but should clean up well. I am taking the cabinet in and having it media blasted to remove the rust and paint. I will repaint it with the original color.

Aside from 2 missing access panels the saw is complete. Miter gauge, rip fence and original motor all intact and functioning. The motor will also get a complete overhaul as time allows.

http://i438.photobucket.com/albums/qq110/medicken/WTBASE.jpg
I HATE PHOTOBUCKET :<((
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Slow going.....but will be worth it

I have been slowly working on restoring the Walker Turner table saw. So far I have completely disassembled the saw and removed most of the rust from the smaller pieces. I originally thought it was only surface rust, but after getting into the saw it was more than I thought. Over all the saw is in good condition given its age. After doing some research and talking to the guys at owwm.com I have determined the saw was built in 1944 or '45.
I have been using electrolysis to remove the rust. It is a slow process but does a really nice job. For those not familiar with the process it involves mixing a solution of washing soda and water. After mixing the piece to be cleaned is submerged in the solution and then applying a low voltage charge to the piece. Along with the piece to be cleaned a sacrificial anode must also be place into the solution. I have been using a 12 volt battery charged set to 10amps. The pieces have set in the tank for up to 48 hrs and have come out with rust and paint falling off. This was my first attempt and am very happy with the results.



 

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Slow going.....but will be worth it

I have been slowly working on restoring the Walker Turner table saw. So far I have completely disassembled the saw and removed most of the rust from the smaller pieces. I originally thought it was only surface rust, but after getting into the saw it was more than I thought. Over all the saw is in good condition given its age. After doing some research and talking to the guys at owwm.com I have determined the saw was built in 1944 or '45.
I have been using electrolysis to remove the rust. It is a slow process but does a really nice job. For those not familiar with the process it involves mixing a solution of washing soda and water. After mixing the piece to be cleaned is submerged in the solution and then applying a low voltage charge to the piece. Along with the piece to be cleaned a sacrificial anode must also be place into the solution. I have been using a 12 volt battery charged set to 10amps. The pieces have set in the tank for up to 48 hrs and have come out with rust and paint falling off. This was my first attempt and am very happy with the results.



NICE! are you planning on repainting it? or just leaving it as is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Slow going.....but will be worth it

I have been slowly working on restoring the Walker Turner table saw. So far I have completely disassembled the saw and removed most of the rust from the smaller pieces. I originally thought it was only surface rust, but after getting into the saw it was more than I thought. Over all the saw is in good condition given its age. After doing some research and talking to the guys at owwm.com I have determined the saw was built in 1944 or '45.
I have been using electrolysis to remove the rust. It is a slow process but does a really nice job. For those not familiar with the process it involves mixing a solution of washing soda and water. After mixing the piece to be cleaned is submerged in the solution and then applying a low voltage charge to the piece. Along with the piece to be cleaned a sacrificial anode must also be place into the solution. I have been using a 12 volt battery charged set to 10amps. The pieces have set in the tank for up to 48 hrs and have come out with rust and paint falling off. This was my first attempt and am very happy with the results.



I am going to repaint to original WT colors
 

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Slow going.....but will be worth it

I have been slowly working on restoring the Walker Turner table saw. So far I have completely disassembled the saw and removed most of the rust from the smaller pieces. I originally thought it was only surface rust, but after getting into the saw it was more than I thought. Over all the saw is in good condition given its age. After doing some research and talking to the guys at owwm.com I have determined the saw was built in 1944 or '45.
I have been using electrolysis to remove the rust. It is a slow process but does a really nice job. For those not familiar with the process it involves mixing a solution of washing soda and water. After mixing the piece to be cleaned is submerged in the solution and then applying a low voltage charge to the piece. Along with the piece to be cleaned a sacrificial anode must also be place into the solution. I have been using a 12 volt battery charged set to 10amps. The pieces have set in the tank for up to 48 hrs and have come out with rust and paint falling off. This was my first attempt and am very happy with the results.



Looking great. My Fay-Egan saw was in pretty good shape.

I just plugged it in and have been using it since.
 

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Slow going.....but will be worth it

I have been slowly working on restoring the Walker Turner table saw. So far I have completely disassembled the saw and removed most of the rust from the smaller pieces. I originally thought it was only surface rust, but after getting into the saw it was more than I thought. Over all the saw is in good condition given its age. After doing some research and talking to the guys at owwm.com I have determined the saw was built in 1944 or '45.
I have been using electrolysis to remove the rust. It is a slow process but does a really nice job. For those not familiar with the process it involves mixing a solution of washing soda and water. After mixing the piece to be cleaned is submerged in the solution and then applying a low voltage charge to the piece. Along with the piece to be cleaned a sacrificial anode must also be place into the solution. I have been using a 12 volt battery charged set to 10amps. The pieces have set in the tank for up to 48 hrs and have come out with rust and paint falling off. This was my first attempt and am very happy with the results.



just curious, but what did you use as a dip tank? I'm hoping to do something similar with a jointer bed. I'm not going to be able to buy a 55 gallon drum for this, so I was wondering what you might have used (in hopes that it is something I might be able to get).
Thanks!
-JC
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Painting time

Well its been really busy around here what with work, repairing a house for the MIL and mom doing a 3 day stint in the hospital I havent had much time to do anything in the shop. However, today i took some time for me and got the first coat of primer on the base of the saw and the trunnion assembly. I will let it dry, fill any imperfections with body filler, wet sand it and recoat. Hopefully things will be better over the next week and I can start reassembly. But there is always the chance that Murphy will show up.




 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Finally some color

I have finally found the time,money and paint for the saw restoration. After 2 coats of primer and wet sanding to 800 grit I put some color on the saw. It is a very close match to what I believe was the original Walker Turner color. I used Sherwin Williams Industrial Enamel thinned to about 10% and sprayed. I do have a few minor blemishes that I will take care of, but the majority of the painting is done. I painted the base, trunnion assembly, motor bracket, the underside of the cast iron top and the extension wings. I will also be painting the top of the wings as they are pitted pretty bad after being attacked by the metal cancer.







 

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Finally some color

I have finally found the time,money and paint for the saw restoration. After 2 coats of primer and wet sanding to 800 grit I put some color on the saw. It is a very close match to what I believe was the original Walker Turner color. I used Sherwin Williams Industrial Enamel thinned to about 10% and sprayed. I do have a few minor blemishes that I will take care of, but the majority of the painting is done. I painted the base, trunnion assembly, motor bracket, the underside of the cast iron top and the extension wings. I will also be painting the top of the wings as they are pitted pretty bad after being attacked by the metal cancer.







Ooo It's going to be better than new
 

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Finally some color

I have finally found the time,money and paint for the saw restoration. After 2 coats of primer and wet sanding to 800 grit I put some color on the saw. It is a very close match to what I believe was the original Walker Turner color. I used Sherwin Williams Industrial Enamel thinned to about 10% and sprayed. I do have a few minor blemishes that I will take care of, but the majority of the painting is done. I painted the base, trunnion assembly, motor bracket, the underside of the cast iron top and the extension wings. I will also be painting the top of the wings as they are pitted pretty bad after being attacked by the metal cancer.







looking good!
 

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Finally some color

I have finally found the time,money and paint for the saw restoration. After 2 coats of primer and wet sanding to 800 grit I put some color on the saw. It is a very close match to what I believe was the original Walker Turner color. I used Sherwin Williams Industrial Enamel thinned to about 10% and sprayed. I do have a few minor blemishes that I will take care of, but the majority of the painting is done. I painted the base, trunnion assembly, motor bracket, the underside of the cast iron top and the extension wings. I will also be painting the top of the wings as they are pitted pretty bad after being attacked by the metal cancer.







This is going to be a quality tool by the time you are finished with the restoration that will have many more years of life left in it.
 

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Finally some color

I have finally found the time,money and paint for the saw restoration. After 2 coats of primer and wet sanding to 800 grit I put some color on the saw. It is a very close match to what I believe was the original Walker Turner color. I used Sherwin Williams Industrial Enamel thinned to about 10% and sprayed. I do have a few minor blemishes that I will take care of, but the majority of the painting is done. I painted the base, trunnion assembly, motor bracket, the underside of the cast iron top and the extension wings. I will also be painting the top of the wings as they are pitted pretty bad after being attacked by the metal cancer.







I do love to see things like this getting restored…and used again…. Looks great…. Can't wait to see the finished product…

Rob
 
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