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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wall / Portable Tool Rack

I seem to have a lot of SU drawings that I do that may or may not ever be built. Either way, I thought others might benefit from them.

This first one is a paged tool rack similar to ones I'm sure you've seen in several publications. Some I like, some I see blatant flaws in. This style reminds me of the days way back when I would go to the Dept. Store and look at the blacklight posters.

Door Rectangle Art Facade Gas


A couple of changes I've made include being able to quickly and easily remove it from the wall mount and work with it on the bench. For less used tools, they could just as easilly be stored on a shelf or slid into a purpose-built cubby hole.

Azure Rectangle Wood Art Paint


I also designed this with single 3/8" plexiglass panels to more easilly find the tool you are looking for. Plywood can easilly be used in place of the plexiglass. I chose against the sometimes more popular peg board for a reason. For me, once I decide where I wanted to hang something on the wall, it pretty much didn't ever change. If it ever did, I didn't mind the holes it left behind in the cases where I just used plywood.

I designed these for square panels, making the frame pieces ALL the same length. This aleviates having Rails and Stiles that are manufactured differently, making it easier to build.

Here's the frame assembly. For the life of me, I cannot recall why I needed the gussets on all 4 corners. The two on the dowel side are mostly cosmetic to cover up the dowels, simply glued in place. It was expected that the holes for the dowels would be drilled after each rack was assembled.

Rectangle Line Triangle Font Material property


EDIT: More pictures:

Here's a better view of one of the Racks.

Rectangle Wood Outdoor furniture Art Font


And some details of the 2×4's holding it to the wall. Lag bolts/washers holding it to the wall are not shown. The washers could be cut from a milk jug. In addition, a support block under the lower support might be in order.

Rectangle Automotive exterior Font Triangle Parallel


Lastly, a shot looking down the end of the upper support with the end face removed. Note the vertical holes on this support. Once drilled, carefully tilt the support about 10 degrees to 'waller out' the hole, but only forwards. This allows the upper dowel to be rotated the 9 degrees needed for removal of each of the racks.

Automotive design Cylinder Rectangle Engineering Parallel


Caveat: As with most of my projects and designs, I stand on the shoulders of those that have gone before me. It is infinitely easier to modify a good design someone else dreamed up than to come up with the whole thing on my own. All comments, suggestions, and criticisms are welcome. :)
 

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Wall / Portable Tool Rack

I seem to have a lot of SU drawings that I do that may or may not ever be built. Either way, I thought others might benefit from them.

This first one is a paged tool rack similar to ones I'm sure you've seen in several publications. Some I like, some I see blatant flaws in. This style reminds me of the days way back when I would go to the Dept. Store and look at the blacklight posters.

Door Rectangle Art Facade Gas


A couple of changes I've made include being able to quickly and easily remove it from the wall mount and work with it on the bench. For less used tools, they could just as easilly be stored on a shelf or slid into a purpose-built cubby hole.

Azure Rectangle Wood Art Paint


I also designed this with single 3/8" plexiglass panels to more easilly find the tool you are looking for. Plywood can easilly be used in place of the plexiglass. I chose against the sometimes more popular peg board for a reason. For me, once I decide where I wanted to hang something on the wall, it pretty much didn't ever change. If it ever did, I didn't mind the holes it left behind in the cases where I just used plywood.

I designed these for square panels, making the frame pieces ALL the same length. This aleviates having Rails and Stiles that are manufactured differently, making it easier to build.

Here's the frame assembly. For the life of me, I cannot recall why I needed the gussets on all 4 corners. The two on the dowel side are mostly cosmetic to cover up the dowels, simply glued in place. It was expected that the holes for the dowels would be drilled after each rack was assembled.

Rectangle Line Triangle Font Material property


EDIT: More pictures:

Here's a better view of one of the Racks.

Rectangle Wood Outdoor furniture Art Font


And some details of the 2×4's holding it to the wall. Lag bolts/washers holding it to the wall are not shown. The washers could be cut from a milk jug. In addition, a support block under the lower support might be in order.

Rectangle Automotive exterior Font Triangle Parallel


Lastly, a shot looking down the end of the upper support with the end face removed. Note the vertical holes on this support. Once drilled, carefully tilt the support about 10 degrees to 'waller out' the hole, but only forwards. This allows the upper dowel to be rotated the 9 degrees needed for removal of each of the racks.

Automotive design Cylinder Rectangle Engineering Parallel


Caveat: As with most of my projects and designs, I stand on the shoulders of those that have gone before me. It is infinitely easier to modify a good design someone else dreamed up than to come up with the whole thing on my own. All comments, suggestions, and criticisms are welcome. :)
Cool drawing.

Lee
 

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Wall / Portable Tool Rack

I seem to have a lot of SU drawings that I do that may or may not ever be built. Either way, I thought others might benefit from them.

This first one is a paged tool rack similar to ones I'm sure you've seen in several publications. Some I like, some I see blatant flaws in. This style reminds me of the days way back when I would go to the Dept. Store and look at the blacklight posters.

Door Rectangle Art Facade Gas


A couple of changes I've made include being able to quickly and easily remove it from the wall mount and work with it on the bench. For less used tools, they could just as easilly be stored on a shelf or slid into a purpose-built cubby hole.

Azure Rectangle Wood Art Paint


I also designed this with single 3/8" plexiglass panels to more easilly find the tool you are looking for. Plywood can easilly be used in place of the plexiglass. I chose against the sometimes more popular peg board for a reason. For me, once I decide where I wanted to hang something on the wall, it pretty much didn't ever change. If it ever did, I didn't mind the holes it left behind in the cases where I just used plywood.

I designed these for square panels, making the frame pieces ALL the same length. This aleviates having Rails and Stiles that are manufactured differently, making it easier to build.

Here's the frame assembly. For the life of me, I cannot recall why I needed the gussets on all 4 corners. The two on the dowel side are mostly cosmetic to cover up the dowels, simply glued in place. It was expected that the holes for the dowels would be drilled after each rack was assembled.

Rectangle Line Triangle Font Material property


EDIT: More pictures:

Here's a better view of one of the Racks.

Rectangle Wood Outdoor furniture Art Font


And some details of the 2×4's holding it to the wall. Lag bolts/washers holding it to the wall are not shown. The washers could be cut from a milk jug. In addition, a support block under the lower support might be in order.

Rectangle Automotive exterior Font Triangle Parallel


Lastly, a shot looking down the end of the upper support with the end face removed. Note the vertical holes on this support. Once drilled, carefully tilt the support about 10 degrees to 'waller out' the hole, but only forwards. This allows the upper dowel to be rotated the 9 degrees needed for removal of each of the racks.

Automotive design Cylinder Rectangle Engineering Parallel


Caveat: As with most of my projects and designs, I stand on the shoulders of those that have gone before me. It is infinitely easier to modify a good design someone else dreamed up than to come up with the whole thing on my own. All comments, suggestions, and criticisms are welcome. :)
I really like this idea… totally cool
 

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Wall / Portable Tool Rack

I seem to have a lot of SU drawings that I do that may or may not ever be built. Either way, I thought others might benefit from them.

This first one is a paged tool rack similar to ones I'm sure you've seen in several publications. Some I like, some I see blatant flaws in. This style reminds me of the days way back when I would go to the Dept. Store and look at the blacklight posters.

Door Rectangle Art Facade Gas


A couple of changes I've made include being able to quickly and easily remove it from the wall mount and work with it on the bench. For less used tools, they could just as easilly be stored on a shelf or slid into a purpose-built cubby hole.

Azure Rectangle Wood Art Paint


I also designed this with single 3/8" plexiglass panels to more easilly find the tool you are looking for. Plywood can easilly be used in place of the plexiglass. I chose against the sometimes more popular peg board for a reason. For me, once I decide where I wanted to hang something on the wall, it pretty much didn't ever change. If it ever did, I didn't mind the holes it left behind in the cases where I just used plywood.

I designed these for square panels, making the frame pieces ALL the same length. This aleviates having Rails and Stiles that are manufactured differently, making it easier to build.

Here's the frame assembly. For the life of me, I cannot recall why I needed the gussets on all 4 corners. The two on the dowel side are mostly cosmetic to cover up the dowels, simply glued in place. It was expected that the holes for the dowels would be drilled after each rack was assembled.

Rectangle Line Triangle Font Material property


EDIT: More pictures:

Here's a better view of one of the Racks.

Rectangle Wood Outdoor furniture Art Font


And some details of the 2×4's holding it to the wall. Lag bolts/washers holding it to the wall are not shown. The washers could be cut from a milk jug. In addition, a support block under the lower support might be in order.

Rectangle Automotive exterior Font Triangle Parallel


Lastly, a shot looking down the end of the upper support with the end face removed. Note the vertical holes on this support. Once drilled, carefully tilt the support about 10 degrees to 'waller out' the hole, but only forwards. This allows the upper dowel to be rotated the 9 degrees needed for removal of each of the racks.

Automotive design Cylinder Rectangle Engineering Parallel


Caveat: As with most of my projects and designs, I stand on the shoulders of those that have gone before me. It is infinitely easier to modify a good design someone else dreamed up than to come up with the whole thing on my own. All comments, suggestions, and criticisms are welcome. :)
Very cool! I like it… Look fwd to seeing this come along!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Workshop Expansion for a Friend

A friend of mine asked if I could help him with a SU drawing for his workshop expansion. He currently has a 16×24 space that he is quickly outgrowing. He has done some woodworking in the past with carving and other things but recently got the bug to step it up a notch. He is planning on having the shell built by a contractor and he and I will finish the inside. Here's a profile view. You can see his existing shop at the rear.

Wheel Tire Land lot Line Urban design


Note: The Tractor, fence, and garden plots were obtained from Google 3D Warehouse. You have to be careful what you get from there. Many of the objects come with a pretty hefty cost with regard to file size. With a little careful planning, file size can be kept managable. Ya just have to think about it when you are building your objects.

Another view from the front:

Property Building Plant Window Terrestrial plant


And a view from the left side, which I left exposed for viewing. I just noticed we're missing a couple of studs. Hope the builder doesn't do the same. :)

Building Shade Rectangle Facade Tints and shades


Once it is finished, I'll try to get some pictures of the result. That'll be several weeks though.
 

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Workshop Expansion for a Friend

A friend of mine asked if I could help him with a SU drawing for his workshop expansion. He currently has a 16×24 space that he is quickly outgrowing. He has done some woodworking in the past with carving and other things but recently got the bug to step it up a notch. He is planning on having the shell built by a contractor and he and I will finish the inside. Here's a profile view. You can see his existing shop at the rear.

Wheel Tire Land lot Line Urban design


Note: The Tractor, fence, and garden plots were obtained from Google 3D Warehouse. You have to be careful what you get from there. Many of the objects come with a pretty hefty cost with regard to file size. With a little careful planning, file size can be kept managable. Ya just have to think about it when you are building your objects.

Another view from the front:

Property Building Plant Window Terrestrial plant


And a view from the left side, which I left exposed for viewing. I just noticed we're missing a couple of studs. Hope the builder doesn't do the same. :)

Building Shade Rectangle Facade Tints and shades


Once it is finished, I'll try to get some pictures of the result. That'll be several weeks though.
I did the same thing when I converted my 60 yr old single car garage to a shop and SU was such a great help. I was able to make, and correct, many of the mistakes while sitting in my easy chair. It was also invaluable when I purchased my materials. I still refer to the original model often. Really nice model that you did. Good luck with your project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rolling Tool Cart

Musical instrument Rectangle Musical instrument accessory Wood Chair


I got the inspiration for this from Workbench Magazine . I deliberately did not look at their drawings for dimensions or scale.

Rectangle Wood Toy Shelving Building sets


This cart looked like a good design. As with many projects, it is infinitely easier to customize an existing design rather than come up with all original ideas. How many times do we stand on the shoulders of giants that have gone before us?

The inner structure:
Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Parallel


I replaced the pegboard on theirs with 1/2" plywood thinking I would simply screw tool holders and such to the plywood. Then I though French Cleats might be better. This led me to thinking about the use of the cart. I could roll it around the shop, gathering up tools and such for a project. Then roll it over to my work area and create all the sawdust one would want. After that project was complete, then I could reconfigure it for another project.

Wood Wood stain Slope Rectangle Parallel


The thinking above sorta requires you 'buy into' the Whole-Shop French-Cleat mindset. It would make changes infinitely easier down the road.

I also wanted to add some clamp storage to the cart. By replacing their inner ply panel with two, then I could put clamps in that slot. Keep in mind this is not meant for "all the clamps in your shop", just the ones for a particular job. Or maybe a subset would always reside in this cart. Being the frugal person I am. I then changed those two inner panels to just plywood strips. These are more easilly obtained from my favorite sport "Dumpster Diving". :D Same rule applies to scraps you may have lying around.

Wood Font Art Carmine Event


Economy of lumber:
Plywood ends are 1/2.
Plywood bottom and shelves are 3/4.
All solid wood is sized to be easilly ripped from 2×4 scraps.

I designed mine as 18×36 at a height of 42. This just seemed about right. The front of the shelves have 1/4" strips fastened with glue to keep things from sliding off. This also adds a little stability to prevent sagging. (Maybe strips on the back of the shelves would be appropriate for the same reasons.) The shelves are screwed & glued to their support cleats on the ends. Those cleats are in turn dry screwed to the end support plywood which makes the shelf height relatively easy to adjust. This seemed to be preferable over shelf pins. I thought the shelves may inadvertantly be used as a handle to push it around and might tumble the shelves over if mere gravity was the only thing holding them in place.

A view with one end support removed:
Rectangle Wood Line Parallel Art


You could make something like this as plain or fancy as you wish. That's the fun thing about having your own workshop. I hope you enjoy this and it gives you ideas for your shop. All comments and/or constructive criticism is welcome.
 

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Rolling Tool Cart

Musical instrument Rectangle Musical instrument accessory Wood Chair


I got the inspiration for this from Workbench Magazine . I deliberately did not look at their drawings for dimensions or scale.

Rectangle Wood Toy Shelving Building sets


This cart looked like a good design. As with many projects, it is infinitely easier to customize an existing design rather than come up with all original ideas. How many times do we stand on the shoulders of giants that have gone before us?

The inner structure:
Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Parallel


I replaced the pegboard on theirs with 1/2" plywood thinking I would simply screw tool holders and such to the plywood. Then I though French Cleats might be better. This led me to thinking about the use of the cart. I could roll it around the shop, gathering up tools and such for a project. Then roll it over to my work area and create all the sawdust one would want. After that project was complete, then I could reconfigure it for another project.

Wood Wood stain Slope Rectangle Parallel


The thinking above sorta requires you 'buy into' the Whole-Shop French-Cleat mindset. It would make changes infinitely easier down the road.

I also wanted to add some clamp storage to the cart. By replacing their inner ply panel with two, then I could put clamps in that slot. Keep in mind this is not meant for "all the clamps in your shop", just the ones for a particular job. Or maybe a subset would always reside in this cart. Being the frugal person I am. I then changed those two inner panels to just plywood strips. These are more easilly obtained from my favorite sport "Dumpster Diving". :D Same rule applies to scraps you may have lying around.

Wood Font Art Carmine Event


Economy of lumber:
Plywood ends are 1/2.
Plywood bottom and shelves are 3/4.
All solid wood is sized to be easilly ripped from 2×4 scraps.

I designed mine as 18×36 at a height of 42. This just seemed about right. The front of the shelves have 1/4" strips fastened with glue to keep things from sliding off. This also adds a little stability to prevent sagging. (Maybe strips on the back of the shelves would be appropriate for the same reasons.) The shelves are screwed & glued to their support cleats on the ends. Those cleats are in turn dry screwed to the end support plywood which makes the shelf height relatively easy to adjust. This seemed to be preferable over shelf pins. I thought the shelves may inadvertantly be used as a handle to push it around and might tumble the shelves over if mere gravity was the only thing holding them in place.

A view with one end support removed:
Rectangle Wood Line Parallel Art


You could make something like this as plain or fancy as you wish. That's the fun thing about having your own workshop. I hope you enjoy this and it gives you ideas for your shop. All comments and/or constructive criticism is welcome.
Nice - you are a whiz with that SU.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Rolling Tool Cart

Musical instrument Rectangle Musical instrument accessory Wood Chair


I got the inspiration for this from Workbench Magazine . I deliberately did not look at their drawings for dimensions or scale.

Rectangle Wood Toy Shelving Building sets


This cart looked like a good design. As with many projects, it is infinitely easier to customize an existing design rather than come up with all original ideas. How many times do we stand on the shoulders of giants that have gone before us?

The inner structure:
Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Parallel


I replaced the pegboard on theirs with 1/2" plywood thinking I would simply screw tool holders and such to the plywood. Then I though French Cleats might be better. This led me to thinking about the use of the cart. I could roll it around the shop, gathering up tools and such for a project. Then roll it over to my work area and create all the sawdust one would want. After that project was complete, then I could reconfigure it for another project.

Wood Wood stain Slope Rectangle Parallel


The thinking above sorta requires you 'buy into' the Whole-Shop French-Cleat mindset. It would make changes infinitely easier down the road.

I also wanted to add some clamp storage to the cart. By replacing their inner ply panel with two, then I could put clamps in that slot. Keep in mind this is not meant for "all the clamps in your shop", just the ones for a particular job. Or maybe a subset would always reside in this cart. Being the frugal person I am. I then changed those two inner panels to just plywood strips. These are more easilly obtained from my favorite sport "Dumpster Diving". :D Same rule applies to scraps you may have lying around.

Wood Font Art Carmine Event


Economy of lumber:
Plywood ends are 1/2.
Plywood bottom and shelves are 3/4.
All solid wood is sized to be easilly ripped from 2×4 scraps.

I designed mine as 18×36 at a height of 42. This just seemed about right. The front of the shelves have 1/4" strips fastened with glue to keep things from sliding off. This also adds a little stability to prevent sagging. (Maybe strips on the back of the shelves would be appropriate for the same reasons.) The shelves are screwed & glued to their support cleats on the ends. Those cleats are in turn dry screwed to the end support plywood which makes the shelf height relatively easy to adjust. This seemed to be preferable over shelf pins. I thought the shelves may inadvertantly be used as a handle to push it around and might tumble the shelves over if mere gravity was the only thing holding them in place.

A view with one end support removed:
Rectangle Wood Line Parallel Art


You could make something like this as plain or fancy as you wish. That's the fun thing about having your own workshop. I hope you enjoy this and it gives you ideas for your shop. All comments and/or constructive criticism is welcome.
Thanks Rod, but no whizzing in my shop.

A friend of mine(Mickey) suggested it would be best if it's low enough to roll underneath bench/countertop. I tend to agree with him. Holes could also be drilled in the top shelf for a set of screwdrivers. And as I usually do on a cart like this, an outlet strip ALWAYS comes in handy.

Suggested contents:

Gluing: Yellah, Gorilla, Epoxy, CA(Three-Bears style… Thin, Med., Thick), Paper towel roll, squirt bottle of water, acid brushes, toothbrushes.
Tape: Painter's tape, Masking tape, Duct tape, Electrical tape.
Screws: Several sizes of Sheetrock screws, Kreg Screws.
Clamps: Bar clamps, spring clamps, Rubber bands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Rolling Tool Cart

Musical instrument Rectangle Musical instrument accessory Wood Chair


I got the inspiration for this from Workbench Magazine . I deliberately did not look at their drawings for dimensions or scale.

Rectangle Wood Toy Shelving Building sets


This cart looked like a good design. As with many projects, it is infinitely easier to customize an existing design rather than come up with all original ideas. How many times do we stand on the shoulders of giants that have gone before us?

The inner structure:
Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Parallel


I replaced the pegboard on theirs with 1/2" plywood thinking I would simply screw tool holders and such to the plywood. Then I though French Cleats might be better. This led me to thinking about the use of the cart. I could roll it around the shop, gathering up tools and such for a project. Then roll it over to my work area and create all the sawdust one would want. After that project was complete, then I could reconfigure it for another project.

Wood Wood stain Slope Rectangle Parallel


The thinking above sorta requires you 'buy into' the Whole-Shop French-Cleat mindset. It would make changes infinitely easier down the road.

I also wanted to add some clamp storage to the cart. By replacing their inner ply panel with two, then I could put clamps in that slot. Keep in mind this is not meant for "all the clamps in your shop", just the ones for a particular job. Or maybe a subset would always reside in this cart. Being the frugal person I am. I then changed those two inner panels to just plywood strips. These are more easilly obtained from my favorite sport "Dumpster Diving". :D Same rule applies to scraps you may have lying around.

Wood Font Art Carmine Event


Economy of lumber:
Plywood ends are 1/2.
Plywood bottom and shelves are 3/4.
All solid wood is sized to be easilly ripped from 2×4 scraps.

I designed mine as 18×36 at a height of 42. This just seemed about right. The front of the shelves have 1/4" strips fastened with glue to keep things from sliding off. This also adds a little stability to prevent sagging. (Maybe strips on the back of the shelves would be appropriate for the same reasons.) The shelves are screwed & glued to their support cleats on the ends. Those cleats are in turn dry screwed to the end support plywood which makes the shelf height relatively easy to adjust. This seemed to be preferable over shelf pins. I thought the shelves may inadvertantly be used as a handle to push it around and might tumble the shelves over if mere gravity was the only thing holding them in place.

A view with one end support removed:
Rectangle Wood Line Parallel Art


You could make something like this as plain or fancy as you wish. That's the fun thing about having your own workshop. I hope you enjoy this and it gives you ideas for your shop. All comments and/or constructive criticism is welcome.
Here's an updated version with a change of wood colors and a few items on the shelf.

Gas Cylinder Rectangle Drawing Art
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
 

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File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
excellent blog on su. why dont we have a on going thread on su. The length was just right. thank you,,,, phil [email protected]
 

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File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
I like to use groups and components more for the ability to control interaction between geometry, to keep parts separate, ease of drawing and manipulating elements…but I guess the file size reduction is a nice benefit. This is similar to blocks in the AutoCAD world. Also with components (and blocks) you can get global updates….you make a change to the component and all like components reflect that change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
Thank you Phil. DaveR used to post on here with a lot of SU stuff but he's concentrating his efforts elsewhere. When folks ask SU questions, there are still several folks here to answer. Do you have any particular areas of SU that you'd like to see discussed?

I agree David. Like parts on a machine that all move together should be 'stuck' together so they move as a cohesive unit. I'm trying to learn to use BobCad for my CNC work. I realize SU has some scripts that can export but BobCad(or TurboCad) seems to be a better fit for that kind of work. But for woodworking(and for free), SU does a pretty good job.
 

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File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
Those are some good tips but I find myself asking…are they really needed? Even a pretty detailed sketchup model doesnt get over a few meg and really even if a file ran 100meg that's not significant these days. To me its just easier to make the components the way I want them as opposed to worrying about the size.
 

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File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
Thanks for the tips! I will confirm that a SU model can get bloated pretty fast as the project grows. As an example, and although it's way out of the realm of woodworking, I've modeled an entire 30 acre 25, 50, 100, and 200-yard shooting range with lot's of construction details and groups, file size was above 24MB, but with some judicious use of these tips and and the 'purge unused' function under the model info window, reduced it to under 5MB.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
Evil, Yes, computers have grown to meet some of the older challenges. Storage is only one reason to keep the file size down. As files grow in size, it also affects the speed at which you can orbit an object or move parts around. Folks with bleeding-edge computers may not notice these affects but I'm guessing that the woodworking community rarely has that fast of a computer.

Smitty, I'll have to look into 'purge unused'. There are still so many things in SU that I have yet to explore. One thing I've found is if I open a model, select everything(Ctrl-A), and copy it to the clipboard. Then create a brand new file(File/New), and paste in place' the contents of the clipboard and save this new model. The extraneous stuff is eliminated. This may in fact have the same effect as 'purge unused'. Hey, we're BOTH learning here. Thanks for sharing.
 

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File Size (WATCH OUT!)

So many times I see a great SU drawing, but the author totally ignored the idea of file size economy. What am I talking about here? If you plan on sharing your file with someone else, it might be beneficial to both parties to stay cognizant of the size of the file you are creating.

Even though I am getting to the point in SU where it no longer impeeds my progress, I still watch SU tutorials from time to time. Just a few months ago, I came across one that went into a some detail about file size consideration. Unfortunately, for the life of me I cannot recall where I saw it and did not save the link. If you know of that(or another) tutorial that talks about file bloat, I would appreciate you sharing that link so I could review it for myself and pass it on to others.

When building objects, I make every separate piece of wood, a component. Why not a group? Well, when you copy a Group, you are copying each and every line and face that makes up that object. When you copy a component, you are essentially only copying a link to the definition of the object rather than a full copy of that object. The definition is stored in your SU file only once and each copy of that Component points back to the definition to understand how it is built. That 'pointer' takes up a whole lot smaller space than the actual definition does.

Another aspect of SU that often contributes to file bloat is curves. Curves are really only a series of straight lines. The default for drawing circles is to make them up with a series of 24 straight lines. You have the option to change that though. When you select the Circle tool, look at the lower right corner of your SU window. See the 24? You can just type 12 and press the Enter key. You have now changed the definition of a circle to only take up 12 line segments rather than the default of 24. Yes, you loose a little bit of resolution and 'realism', but how 'real' does a hidden hole really need to be in a drawing? Not often in most cases. Take the case below where we draw a caster. The one on the left takes 77kb to draw, whereas the one on the right reduces that to only 33kb:

Sleeve Font Symbol Drawing Graphics


Once you zoom out to see the whole project, you'll likely not even notice the resolution difference. To compound that, imagine a Sphere. By default, it is made up of many faces. 288 to be exact. By changing your default circle to just half(12), you reduce the number of faces to a mere 72:

White Line Material property Art Symmetry


I'm not suggesting that you ALWAYS reduce the resolution, but you can certainly reduce it when it is not needed. After all, the purpose for most of us woodworkers in using SU is to 1) get an idea of an object's shape and dimensional ratios before we go cutting up possibly expensive lumber, and 2) to have the drawing tell US what the exact dimension of a piece is that we've designed.

And as mentioned earlier, using Components rather than Groups, you can further reduce your file sizes. I hope this is helpful to some of you.
Rance

Thanks for this blog. A few days ago I was trying to solve a problem using the intersection of two circles where the standard 24 segments per circle was simply not accurate enough. If I'd known then how to increase the number of segments, I would have been able to get a much better result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Rolling Wood Storage Rack

I've seen several variations of these rolling wood storage units. Inspired by them, I came up with this one for a friend of mine:

Rectangle Parallel Drawing Illustration Plan


It incorporates storage for long lumber, sheet goods, and small turning blocks as well. About the only thing I might add would be dowel storage of some kind. Truth be told, I'd probably just put them in tubes and store them on one of the shelves.

It is a typical A-Frame design with half lapped joints. For economy, most of the stick material is 2×4 lumber. The sheet goods are 1/4" Luan, largly because I have access to lots of it for free. Obviously you should substitute for what you have plentifully available. Note the Rope on the left to keep the sheet goods from tipping out too far when moving the cart or rifling through the sheets. It can be quicky detatched at the top from the eye hook.

Rectangle Table Engineering Triangle Facade


In the center are 4 shelves. As depicted, I might store turning blanks and such on the Top and Upper shelves. For the Lower and Bottom shelves, plastic bins might be used. I would adjust the width of the Lower shelf to fit the bins you plan on using. Same with shelf height. The bottom center could still be used to store traditional long lumber, but getting it out could be a problem in a smaller shop.

Font Building Parallel Basketball hoop Urban design


By simply laying a piece of paneling on that Upper shelf, this would make it easier to get access to the inner section by just sliding the panel out. No fancy rollers needed, just wax the panel before putting it in place.

Property Wood Architecture Rectangle Material property


The Middle and Lower inner shelves could contain bins for additional storage of smaller offcuts. Or the bins could be used to store projects away at the end of the day or until a back ordered part arrives. To access the inner bins, take one out of one end and shove it back in the opposite end.

Naval architecture Facade Building Urban design Illustration


I've designed one corner so it could be temporarilly tied to the wall. I would imagine that access to sheet goods would not be needed as often. By raising the short rod, the whole cart could be moved. FWIW, the handle on that rod must be screwed in place after the rod is slid in place.

Rectangle Wood Material property Parallel Slope


You could also go with non-swiveling casters but you'd need to mount them at a perpendicular angle to the pivot rod as shown here.

Brown Rectangle Window Wood Fixture


As an alternate, I might suggest moving the two outer supports(blue) for the top, to the next inner A-Frames. This might better balance the top and allow easier access for long pieces stored on that upper shelf.

Rectangle Table Triangle Parallel Engineering


Here you can see the design of the individual A-Frames.

Rectangle Triangle Parallel Wood Font


Many variations could be made here, smaller top, eliminating the shelves on the sheetgoods side, etc. I rarely build strictly by 'plans', and I'd expect you to 'make this your own' as well. All comments and suggestions are welcome. Enjoy!
 

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Rolling Wood Storage Rack

I've seen several variations of these rolling wood storage units. Inspired by them, I came up with this one for a friend of mine:

Rectangle Parallel Drawing Illustration Plan


It incorporates storage for long lumber, sheet goods, and small turning blocks as well. About the only thing I might add would be dowel storage of some kind. Truth be told, I'd probably just put them in tubes and store them on one of the shelves.

It is a typical A-Frame design with half lapped joints. For economy, most of the stick material is 2×4 lumber. The sheet goods are 1/4" Luan, largly because I have access to lots of it for free. Obviously you should substitute for what you have plentifully available. Note the Rope on the left to keep the sheet goods from tipping out too far when moving the cart or rifling through the sheets. It can be quicky detatched at the top from the eye hook.

Rectangle Table Engineering Triangle Facade


In the center are 4 shelves. As depicted, I might store turning blanks and such on the Top and Upper shelves. For the Lower and Bottom shelves, plastic bins might be used. I would adjust the width of the Lower shelf to fit the bins you plan on using. Same with shelf height. The bottom center could still be used to store traditional long lumber, but getting it out could be a problem in a smaller shop.

Font Building Parallel Basketball hoop Urban design


By simply laying a piece of paneling on that Upper shelf, this would make it easier to get access to the inner section by just sliding the panel out. No fancy rollers needed, just wax the panel before putting it in place.

Property Wood Architecture Rectangle Material property


The Middle and Lower inner shelves could contain bins for additional storage of smaller offcuts. Or the bins could be used to store projects away at the end of the day or until a back ordered part arrives. To access the inner bins, take one out of one end and shove it back in the opposite end.

Naval architecture Facade Building Urban design Illustration


I've designed one corner so it could be temporarilly tied to the wall. I would imagine that access to sheet goods would not be needed as often. By raising the short rod, the whole cart could be moved. FWIW, the handle on that rod must be screwed in place after the rod is slid in place.

Rectangle Wood Material property Parallel Slope


You could also go with non-swiveling casters but you'd need to mount them at a perpendicular angle to the pivot rod as shown here.

Brown Rectangle Window Wood Fixture


As an alternate, I might suggest moving the two outer supports(blue) for the top, to the next inner A-Frames. This might better balance the top and allow easier access for long pieces stored on that upper shelf.

Rectangle Table Triangle Parallel Engineering


Here you can see the design of the individual A-Frames.

Rectangle Triangle Parallel Wood Font


Many variations could be made here, smaller top, eliminating the shelves on the sheetgoods side, etc. I rarely build strictly by 'plans', and I'd expect you to 'make this your own' as well. All comments and suggestions are welcome. Enjoy!
looks pretty good. my only suggestion would be to go with the largest casters possible. i made a similar cart using 5" casters and it can be a bear getting it rolling, id imagine the weight of your cart would be somewhat more then the one i built fully loaded.
 

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