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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hey everyone. New guy here. I'm a restorer of everything old. Starting with tube radios from the 30's to refrigerators from the 40's. I just finished a 1956 Oldsmobile so now I'm focusing on wood working. I just finished restoring a 1953 craftsman table saw and I need to make a push stick. I decided I might as well follow suit and restore an old band saw to make my push stick. I found an old band saw locally and the old man (about 95 years old) told me this band saw was from around the 1970's. I think it might be a little older than that. So now I'm here. If any of y'all know anything about this Ol gal, let me know. The only makings on Her are stamped in. BS1, BS2 & BS3
There's nothing else. I spent an hour cleaning Her up
Wood Art Gas Hardwood Machine


Wood Floor Flooring Gas Hardwood


Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Gas Bumper Auto part


Wood Automotive tire Gas Machine Automotive wheel system


Wheel Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Wood


Wood Gas Wheel Steering wheel Machine


Automotive tire Bumper Motor vehicle Wood Automotive exterior


Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Gas Bumper Auto part


Wood Gas Wheel Machine Metal


Wood Tool Bumper Composite material Hardwood
 

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The C-frame casting and the 6 straight spoked wheels make me think Boice Crane. But I think most of their saws had the company name cast in. Maybe something that they made for Craftsman or some other store brand? I'd probably start my search with Boice-Crane though. Atlas and Walker Turner are other possibilities for cast frames but they typically had different styles of wheels.
 

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Hard to tell given the sideways and off angle photos, but I think Ken was pointing in the right direction - looks pretty much like a Boice Crane 12" Handi Band Saw (missing the wheel covers), made back sometime around the late 20's and early 30's. There are a few minor differences, but that could be attributed to previous owners 'creativity' in fixing problems ;)

Measure the distance between the frame and blade so we know the size, and perhaps take some better pictures, particularly from dead front/rear. That design ("C" frame) was fairly common back then, so it's really just the details that will set it apart.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited by Moderator)
Thanks for the information Fellas.
Now at least I have something to research.
I'm not sure why the photos are turning sideways.
It's 12 1/2" from the frame to the blade.
Wood Gas Art Metal Sculpture


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Automotive tire Wheel Wood Steering wheel Gas


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Having the tensioner cast into the frame like that (instead of being a seperate assembly that bolted on) is something that I don't see popping up in my searches for various makers. That may be the key to identifying it. Quick scans of google images for Boice Crane, Atlas, Walker Turner, Delta, and Rockwell didn't find me anything I'd consider a match. You may spend some time perusing the photo index on Vintage Machinery for bandsaws in whatever size that one is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good eye Ken. I noticed that too.
I was just talk'n to Dad and He said "imagine if yours is a prototype that someone built then sold to Boice Crane"
That would be cool huh…..
the BS1 BS2 BS3 stamps are weird. Why would anyone stamp that and nothing else??
The detective works continues.
We will figure this Ol Gal out.
Thank you.
 

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That's a good point Spider. Looking at the photos now, that could very well be a welded frame. Can you verify whether that's welded up or cast? And it looks like a bunch of bolts with hex nuts through the center web. Is that what they are? If so, any idea why they're there?

Assuming it is cast, the BS1,2,3 markings are probably there to identify the pattern pieces for making the casting molds more so than for identifying the cast parts.

Can you measure the diameter of the wheels? It would be helpful to know what size bandsaw it is.
 

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Holy smokes. You solved the mystery. Outstanding job Ken.
Now I can clean Her up, freshen up Her table so She'll be presentable.
She's cutting beautifully now with Her new blade & belt. It is I that need the fine tuning now. I will master this band saw.
Thank you all so much for the advice and help.

Always shoot for the moon, if you miss, you'll still be amongst the stars
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok so now that we know what band saw I have, would it be ok to start the restoration??? This will be my band saw for years to come. I want to fully disassemble, clean, polish, paint the wheels Red with new Red tires, clean up the black enamel on the frame, freshen up all the wood then lube all moving parts. I just want to make sure I'm not ruining this old Gal. Thank you all for helping me. I can get used to this woodworking. It's actually pretty fun. I just made 1 leg for the stool I'm making to use on my new old band saw.
 

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that machine is a gem!!
Probably it was mentioned by the other comments, but a place that is gonna be of real help for you is www.vintagemachinery.org, I restored not long ago a 1970 Rockwell metal/wood bandsaw, and I found several people there who went through the same process, so the info I obtained from them was precious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Welp….. that was a fun one.
I'm still goof'n around with the old Emerson Motor. I just thought I'd say thanks again for all the info and advice.
Just a heads up, if anyone finds one of these old gals, She a really really really dark blue. Her wheels wer Red though. I bought the black already so I didn't want to try and find Her original color. She still came out pretty well.
I'll catch y'all on the next one.
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Steering wheel
 

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