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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
Karson, Karson, Karson. I'm not worthy! What a great explanation, demonstration and outcome. Wow!
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
ditto
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
Thanks for the steps and your help, Karson. You're the best!
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
Great info Karson. Thanks.
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
Ive always used a large paper cutter for making my two inch slices. Because I usually dont know what two woods ill be mating, i cut the strips into squares which can be arranged into the correct pattern when assembled. I do however love your technique and i guess its easy enough to select the woods initially and you are dealing with much fewer moving pieces, hence fewer chances for the expected screw-up.. thank you for showing me a new approach.
On an esthetic point. I usually make the borders out of one of the center woods. It gives a certain consistency to the project. Of course, one can employ a third wood as its border, but it should be a very neutral wood with limited grain or mottle. This way the eye is drawn to the chessboard which is the central theme of the project. Your choice of eucalyptus might be a tad too "busy" and overshadow the central woods. Kingwood is too gorgeous to be upstaged by anything,
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
Dan I wish I had a large paper cutter. or a veneer cutter. They do a great job. Thanks for your in sites on focusing the eye unto what is important.
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
Great post, thanks!!!
 

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Making the Veneered surface

The making of a chess board with veneer. Mark made a comment earlier this week about a chess board that was presented as a project, that he'd like to make one for his son.

I sent him a private message and suggested that if he wanted to make a chess board, that I'd provide the veneer and some instructions on making it. There have been other posts in the last couple of weeks about veneering and vacuum veneering.

Mark replied that he didn't have the equipment to do the veneering. I told him that it could be done with items that he probably already has, and I think I shamed him into saying that he'd do it.

I sent him a private e-mail message that contained an address of some pictures on Flickr that I thought that he might like to consider. The address is here I must have had a brain freeze because in all of my communications with him and in starting to work on this blog I believed that there were 12 squares on a side instead of 8. So the measurements that I suggested are probably too small. A 2" square would make a board that is 16" X 16" without the apron. That is probably a normal size 2 ½" would make a 20" board on the playing surface.

So what to do. Get some veneers that could be used as the light squares and dark squares. They really don't have to be white and black. Checker boards are Red and Black, but you don't want something that confuses the players.

For my sample I selected Birds-Eye maple and Kingwood. I first trimmed off the edge of the Kingwood to get rid of the white edge.


My blog on veneering contained the tools that I use on cutting veneers. For this one I started using the chisel
But I found that the grain structure was waving back and forth across the cut line and I was getting chip outs on the edge. So I ended up using a veneer saw.



Trim off all of the one side so that you have a clean edge. Then sand the edge to make it straight and smooth

Then I cut the Birds-eye maple veneer, to the same width of the Kingwood.


In this case do as I say and not do as I do. Attach a stop block to your cutting board. My ruler was 2" wide and so you butt the veneer up to the stop block, Tape it down on the two edges to keep it from moving. Then you lay the ruler against the stop block so that when you cut, the veneer it is 2" wide, and as long as you need.

Cut 4 strips of dark veneer, and 5 strips of light veneer. Why you ask, I thought you'd never do it. I'll show you in just a second. Lay the strips side by side, starting with the light strip


And continue until you have used all of your strips. Make sure that all of the strips have the grain in sequence from when it was cut

You will notice that the grain on the King wood is all the same, because these were 4 strips that were side-by-side in the flitch and I cut the same amount of wood off each of the strips. The birds' eye maple has the same grain pattern on strips 1, 3 and 5 at the bottom. I was able to get 2 strips from each leaf of veneer. So strip 1 and 2 was from veneer leaf 1, and strip 3 & 4 was from veneer sheet 2, and strip 5 was from the 3rd veneer sheet. They are also lined up in the same position from top and bottom.

You now cut off one end, making sure that it is square.

Cutting across grain required a veneer saw, because a knife will cause the veneer to split.

Cut off a strip across all of the slices

I number the strip at the top with a 1 so that I can keep them in order.
You then cut all 8 strips.

They are all numbered from 1 to 8. You then turn them over


The next seven photos were destroyed. I turned off the camera before it finished storing the picture and the memory got corrupted. So I'll simulate what I did, because at this point the sheet is all taped together as a full sheet.

Back with some more pictures.
You slide every other row to the right. Since you are looking at the back you want the white square to be on the lower left.

You then tape them in place. Taping every row.
You then turn it back over and put a run of tape down the cut rows.

You then peel off the dangling white squares. And turn it back over and take off the tape on the back

So you now have the taped board surface


So here is a picture of the completed surface for the full board and the redone ½ board


Remember at this time you are looking at the back so the white square is on the lower left. When you look at it on the taped side the white is on the lower right.

The next post will be attaching the aprons and gluing the chess surface to the substrate.
Great info you provided us! Thx
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Putting the Apron on the chess surface

Placing the apron on the veneered chess surface.
First you sand the edge of the chess surface to make all edges smooth.


Then you select the veneer that you want for the aprons. I selected Bees Wing Eucalyptus from Dons' and Tony Wards and other's country Australia.


I cut the sheets with enough length to allow for a full overlap on the outside edge.


I am taping them to the surface with the back side up. I place the apron veneer all the way around

I turn it over and tape all of the seams


Turn it back with the back up, because you want to see the corners of the chess surface.


Then you place your ruler or straight edge so that it intersects the corners.


Then tape down your ruler. It probably will require more tape than I used.


This is now probably the time for the trusty Xacto knife.


Cut the angles for the corner and separate the pieces.


You might find that the edges don't fit too close, so use the sanding block to smooth the edges.


You now have the apron cut around the chess board.


Turn it back over and tape all of the seams.


Turn it back over and remove the tape from the back


Ops! A boo-boo A piece missing from the seam area so pick up one of the scrap pieces so make a patch.


Well Golly Be. It wasn't a missing piece of wood; it was an extra piece of tape.


You might notice the larger than expected gap at the corner seam. Try to pull it together with the tape, or this will become your practice for mixing sanding dust with super glue to patch fill the seams.


You will note that the surface is approx 25" square, but there are splits on the edges. What I do is I glue it to the substrate as it is. And then I cut it square on the table saw. I might use 26" square substrate so that all edges of the veneer are protected. I'd draw a line around the substrate to match where the borders of the chess top should line up.

But that's another post. On another day.
 

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Putting the Apron on the chess surface

Placing the apron on the veneered chess surface.
First you sand the edge of the chess surface to make all edges smooth.


Then you select the veneer that you want for the aprons. I selected Bees Wing Eucalyptus from Dons' and Tony Wards and other's country Australia.


I cut the sheets with enough length to allow for a full overlap on the outside edge.


I am taping them to the surface with the back side up. I place the apron veneer all the way around

I turn it over and tape all of the seams


Turn it back with the back up, because you want to see the corners of the chess surface.


Then you place your ruler or straight edge so that it intersects the corners.


Then tape down your ruler. It probably will require more tape than I used.


This is now probably the time for the trusty Xacto knife.


Cut the angles for the corner and separate the pieces.


You might find that the edges don't fit too close, so use the sanding block to smooth the edges.


You now have the apron cut around the chess board.


Turn it back over and tape all of the seams.


Turn it back over and remove the tape from the back


Ops! A boo-boo A piece missing from the seam area so pick up one of the scrap pieces so make a patch.


Well Golly Be. It wasn't a missing piece of wood; it was an extra piece of tape.


You might notice the larger than expected gap at the corner seam. Try to pull it together with the tape, or this will become your practice for mixing sanding dust with super glue to patch fill the seams.


You will note that the surface is approx 25" square, but there are splits on the edges. What I do is I glue it to the substrate as it is. And then I cut it square on the table saw. I might use 26" square substrate so that all edges of the veneer are protected. I'd draw a line around the substrate to match where the borders of the chess top should line up.

But that's another post. On another day.
This is really great, Karson! I've often wanted to do a chess table and was always concerned about wood movement with the pieces. I really had no idea that it could be done this way. Thank you!
 

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Putting the Apron on the chess surface

Placing the apron on the veneered chess surface.
First you sand the edge of the chess surface to make all edges smooth.


Then you select the veneer that you want for the aprons. I selected Bees Wing Eucalyptus from Dons' and Tony Wards and other's country Australia.


I cut the sheets with enough length to allow for a full overlap on the outside edge.


I am taping them to the surface with the back side up. I place the apron veneer all the way around

I turn it over and tape all of the seams


Turn it back with the back up, because you want to see the corners of the chess surface.


Then you place your ruler or straight edge so that it intersects the corners.


Then tape down your ruler. It probably will require more tape than I used.


This is now probably the time for the trusty Xacto knife.


Cut the angles for the corner and separate the pieces.


You might find that the edges don't fit too close, so use the sanding block to smooth the edges.


You now have the apron cut around the chess board.


Turn it back over and tape all of the seams.


Turn it back over and remove the tape from the back


Ops! A boo-boo A piece missing from the seam area so pick up one of the scrap pieces so make a patch.


Well Golly Be. It wasn't a missing piece of wood; it was an extra piece of tape.


You might notice the larger than expected gap at the corner seam. Try to pull it together with the tape, or this will become your practice for mixing sanding dust with super glue to patch fill the seams.


You will note that the surface is approx 25" square, but there are splits on the edges. What I do is I glue it to the substrate as it is. And then I cut it square on the table saw. I might use 26" square substrate so that all edges of the veneer are protected. I'd draw a line around the substrate to match where the borders of the chess top should line up.

But that's another post. On another day.
Thats the way I USED to do it. But blue masking tape can leave a slight residue that can pick up sanding dust. For a project such as this, treat yourself to some veneer tape. A huge roll costs about 6 bucks. I place it on the "Good" side of the project and glue down the back with the tape still on. The best part is that while blue tape is minimally elastic, Veneer tape dries pulling the butted pieces tighter. It can be removed by iron steaming after the glue has become permanent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Putting the Apron on the chess surface

Placing the apron on the veneered chess surface.
First you sand the edge of the chess surface to make all edges smooth.


Then you select the veneer that you want for the aprons. I selected Bees Wing Eucalyptus from Dons' and Tony Wards and other's country Australia.


I cut the sheets with enough length to allow for a full overlap on the outside edge.


I am taping them to the surface with the back side up. I place the apron veneer all the way around

I turn it over and tape all of the seams


Turn it back with the back up, because you want to see the corners of the chess surface.


Then you place your ruler or straight edge so that it intersects the corners.


Then tape down your ruler. It probably will require more tape than I used.


This is now probably the time for the trusty Xacto knife.


Cut the angles for the corner and separate the pieces.


You might find that the edges don't fit too close, so use the sanding block to smooth the edges.


You now have the apron cut around the chess board.


Turn it back over and tape all of the seams.


Turn it back over and remove the tape from the back


Ops! A boo-boo A piece missing from the seam area so pick up one of the scrap pieces so make a patch.


Well Golly Be. It wasn't a missing piece of wood; it was an extra piece of tape.


You might notice the larger than expected gap at the corner seam. Try to pull it together with the tape, or this will become your practice for mixing sanding dust with super glue to patch fill the seams.


You will note that the surface is approx 25" square, but there are splits on the edges. What I do is I glue it to the substrate as it is. And then I cut it square on the table saw. I might use 26" square substrate so that all edges of the veneer are protected. I'd draw a line around the substrate to match where the borders of the chess top should line up.

But that's another post. On another day.
I've never been good at getting the veneer tape to stick, and stay stuck. I use clear sealing tape now because it doesn't press into the veneer. and it's easy to come off. I use a scraper. I find that I have better control on the veneered surfaces than with a ROS. I still use it but with fine grits so the veneer doesn't disapear and the substrate appear.

The scraper also peals off glue that comes through the surface.

You need to be good at sharpening though. A dull scraper takes a loooong time.

Maybe a few more trials with the veneer tape. I just bought 2 new rolls a couple of months ago.

Thanks for the suggestion, and your experiences.
 

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Putting the Apron on the chess surface

Placing the apron on the veneered chess surface.
First you sand the edge of the chess surface to make all edges smooth.


Then you select the veneer that you want for the aprons. I selected Bees Wing Eucalyptus from Dons' and Tony Wards and other's country Australia.


I cut the sheets with enough length to allow for a full overlap on the outside edge.


I am taping them to the surface with the back side up. I place the apron veneer all the way around

I turn it over and tape all of the seams


Turn it back with the back up, because you want to see the corners of the chess surface.


Then you place your ruler or straight edge so that it intersects the corners.


Then tape down your ruler. It probably will require more tape than I used.


This is now probably the time for the trusty Xacto knife.


Cut the angles for the corner and separate the pieces.


You might find that the edges don't fit too close, so use the sanding block to smooth the edges.


You now have the apron cut around the chess board.


Turn it back over and tape all of the seams.


Turn it back over and remove the tape from the back


Ops! A boo-boo A piece missing from the seam area so pick up one of the scrap pieces so make a patch.


Well Golly Be. It wasn't a missing piece of wood; it was an extra piece of tape.


You might notice the larger than expected gap at the corner seam. Try to pull it together with the tape, or this will become your practice for mixing sanding dust with super glue to patch fill the seams.


You will note that the surface is approx 25" square, but there are splits on the edges. What I do is I glue it to the substrate as it is. And then I cut it square on the table saw. I might use 26" square substrate so that all edges of the veneer are protected. I'd draw a line around the substrate to match where the borders of the chess top should line up.

But that's another post. On another day.
Looks great Karson! This is one of my "one of these days" projects. I'd love to try my hand at veneering and I think the 1st thing I do will be a chess board.
 

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Putting the Apron on the chess surface

Placing the apron on the veneered chess surface.
First you sand the edge of the chess surface to make all edges smooth.


Then you select the veneer that you want for the aprons. I selected Bees Wing Eucalyptus from Dons' and Tony Wards and other's country Australia.


I cut the sheets with enough length to allow for a full overlap on the outside edge.


I am taping them to the surface with the back side up. I place the apron veneer all the way around

I turn it over and tape all of the seams


Turn it back with the back up, because you want to see the corners of the chess surface.


Then you place your ruler or straight edge so that it intersects the corners.


Then tape down your ruler. It probably will require more tape than I used.


This is now probably the time for the trusty Xacto knife.


Cut the angles for the corner and separate the pieces.


You might find that the edges don't fit too close, so use the sanding block to smooth the edges.


You now have the apron cut around the chess board.


Turn it back over and tape all of the seams.


Turn it back over and remove the tape from the back


Ops! A boo-boo A piece missing from the seam area so pick up one of the scrap pieces so make a patch.


Well Golly Be. It wasn't a missing piece of wood; it was an extra piece of tape.


You might notice the larger than expected gap at the corner seam. Try to pull it together with the tape, or this will become your practice for mixing sanding dust with super glue to patch fill the seams.


You will note that the surface is approx 25" square, but there are splits on the edges. What I do is I glue it to the substrate as it is. And then I cut it square on the table saw. I might use 26" square substrate so that all edges of the veneer are protected. I'd draw a line around the substrate to match where the borders of the chess top should line up.

But that's another post. On another day.
Karson, I'm going to be revisiting these often! It's the next best thing to having you there in person.
 
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