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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Getting started

In the front area of our house (the formal living and dinning combined) there are two windows that we decided need valances above them before we purchase window treatments for them.





I found a picture similar to what we were looking for:



The couple that I am going to build will be painted white. Normally i would start with rough lumber and process it, but because this is a painted project i went to my local box store to pick up some yellow pine as well as some molding.

It took me a while but I finally found 3 mostly straight boards in the pile, I didn't find a crown cove modeling that i liked but i did find a piece of crown that should do the job.




First step was a quick check to make sure my table saw was setup correctly to cut down the front and side pieces, I just picked up an 8" wixey digital protractor on sale at rocker and I am loving it!




After getting these cut to size I set the saw blade to 45 deg bevel (outside bevel of 135 deg):



pieces cut to proper length and mitered:



Next was the glue up; I'm sure several of you have seen this tip before but for those who haven't here it is; lay the pieces to glue up (inside face down) an but the mites together, then put tap on the seem, next flip the piece over and glue it as normal and bring the pieces together, the tap will act as as clamp to hold the front edge closed.





Next, I moved on to cutting the moldings for the bottom:



Thats all the time I had today, so I'll have to finish this up next weekend.

Problems I ran into:
Even though I made sure the blade was set to 45 deg (picture above) my corners still did not come out clean, in order to get the corner joint to be 90 deg the front of the miter had a gap, luckily this is a painted project and I filled it in, but if any one has any tips they can offer me on how to get these perfect I would love to know.

The miters on the bottom modeling that I cut by putting the blade at 90 deg and using the miter gage at 45 deg came out perfect though.
 

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Registered
Joined
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874 Posts
Getting started

In the front area of our house (the formal living and dinning combined) there are two windows that we decided need valances above them before we purchase window treatments for them.





I found a picture similar to what we were looking for:



The couple that I am going to build will be painted white. Normally i would start with rough lumber and process it, but because this is a painted project i went to my local box store to pick up some yellow pine as well as some molding.

It took me a while but I finally found 3 mostly straight boards in the pile, I didn't find a crown cove modeling that i liked but i did find a piece of crown that should do the job.




First step was a quick check to make sure my table saw was setup correctly to cut down the front and side pieces, I just picked up an 8" wixey digital protractor on sale at rocker and I am loving it!




After getting these cut to size I set the saw blade to 45 deg bevel (outside bevel of 135 deg):



pieces cut to proper length and mitered:



Next was the glue up; I'm sure several of you have seen this tip before but for those who haven't here it is; lay the pieces to glue up (inside face down) an but the mites together, then put tap on the seem, next flip the piece over and glue it as normal and bring the pieces together, the tap will act as as clamp to hold the front edge closed.





Next, I moved on to cutting the moldings for the bottom:



Thats all the time I had today, so I'll have to finish this up next weekend.

Problems I ran into:
Even though I made sure the blade was set to 45 deg (picture above) my corners still did not come out clean, in order to get the corner joint to be 90 deg the front of the miter had a gap, luckily this is a painted project and I filled it in, but if any one has any tips they can offer me on how to get these perfect I would love to know.

The miters on the bottom modeling that I cut by putting the blade at 90 deg and using the miter gage at 45 deg came out perfect though.
David, I like the idea. I have a few windows that could use some upgrading. I will be watching this blog closely.
 

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Registered
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10,908 Posts
Getting started

In the front area of our house (the formal living and dinning combined) there are two windows that we decided need valances above them before we purchase window treatments for them.





I found a picture similar to what we were looking for:



The couple that I am going to build will be painted white. Normally i would start with rough lumber and process it, but because this is a painted project i went to my local box store to pick up some yellow pine as well as some molding.

It took me a while but I finally found 3 mostly straight boards in the pile, I didn't find a crown cove modeling that i liked but i did find a piece of crown that should do the job.




First step was a quick check to make sure my table saw was setup correctly to cut down the front and side pieces, I just picked up an 8" wixey digital protractor on sale at rocker and I am loving it!




After getting these cut to size I set the saw blade to 45 deg bevel (outside bevel of 135 deg):



pieces cut to proper length and mitered:



Next was the glue up; I'm sure several of you have seen this tip before but for those who haven't here it is; lay the pieces to glue up (inside face down) an but the mites together, then put tap on the seem, next flip the piece over and glue it as normal and bring the pieces together, the tap will act as as clamp to hold the front edge closed.





Next, I moved on to cutting the moldings for the bottom:



Thats all the time I had today, so I'll have to finish this up next weekend.

Problems I ran into:
Even though I made sure the blade was set to 45 deg (picture above) my corners still did not come out clean, in order to get the corner joint to be 90 deg the front of the miter had a gap, luckily this is a painted project and I filled it in, but if any one has any tips they can offer me on how to get these perfect I would love to know.

The miters on the bottom modeling that I cut by putting the blade at 90 deg and using the miter gage at 45 deg came out perfect though.
You're looking good. In responce to your question about the 45, I use my miter box for this small of a cut. If you used the tablesaw as I am assuming you did, your miter guage could have been off just enough to not get a true 45. I use a tablesaw as a last resort when doing 45's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Getting started

In the front area of our house (the formal living and dinning combined) there are two windows that we decided need valances above them before we purchase window treatments for them.





I found a picture similar to what we were looking for:



The couple that I am going to build will be painted white. Normally i would start with rough lumber and process it, but because this is a painted project i went to my local box store to pick up some yellow pine as well as some molding.

It took me a while but I finally found 3 mostly straight boards in the pile, I didn't find a crown cove modeling that i liked but i did find a piece of crown that should do the job.




First step was a quick check to make sure my table saw was setup correctly to cut down the front and side pieces, I just picked up an 8" wixey digital protractor on sale at rocker and I am loving it!




After getting these cut to size I set the saw blade to 45 deg bevel (outside bevel of 135 deg):



pieces cut to proper length and mitered:



Next was the glue up; I'm sure several of you have seen this tip before but for those who haven't here it is; lay the pieces to glue up (inside face down) an but the mites together, then put tap on the seem, next flip the piece over and glue it as normal and bring the pieces together, the tap will act as as clamp to hold the front edge closed.





Next, I moved on to cutting the moldings for the bottom:



Thats all the time I had today, so I'll have to finish this up next weekend.

Problems I ran into:
Even though I made sure the blade was set to 45 deg (picture above) my corners still did not come out clean, in order to get the corner joint to be 90 deg the front of the miter had a gap, luckily this is a painted project and I filled it in, but if any one has any tips they can offer me on how to get these perfect I would love to know.

The miters on the bottom modeling that I cut by putting the blade at 90 deg and using the miter gage at 45 deg came out perfect though.
cabinetmaster,

thanks for reading and thank you for responding, the miters on the moldings came out ok, the problem i ran into was the miter on the main box, i cut these by tilting the saw blade to 45 deg measured in the pic above and cross cut them, does that make sense? its hard to express in words…
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,944 Posts
Getting started

In the front area of our house (the formal living and dinning combined) there are two windows that we decided need valances above them before we purchase window treatments for them.





I found a picture similar to what we were looking for:



The couple that I am going to build will be painted white. Normally i would start with rough lumber and process it, but because this is a painted project i went to my local box store to pick up some yellow pine as well as some molding.

It took me a while but I finally found 3 mostly straight boards in the pile, I didn't find a crown cove modeling that i liked but i did find a piece of crown that should do the job.




First step was a quick check to make sure my table saw was setup correctly to cut down the front and side pieces, I just picked up an 8" wixey digital protractor on sale at rocker and I am loving it!




After getting these cut to size I set the saw blade to 45 deg bevel (outside bevel of 135 deg):



pieces cut to proper length and mitered:



Next was the glue up; I'm sure several of you have seen this tip before but for those who haven't here it is; lay the pieces to glue up (inside face down) an but the mites together, then put tap on the seem, next flip the piece over and glue it as normal and bring the pieces together, the tap will act as as clamp to hold the front edge closed.





Next, I moved on to cutting the moldings for the bottom:



Thats all the time I had today, so I'll have to finish this up next weekend.

Problems I ran into:
Even though I made sure the blade was set to 45 deg (picture above) my corners still did not come out clean, in order to get the corner joint to be 90 deg the front of the miter had a gap, luckily this is a painted project and I filled it in, but if any one has any tips they can offer me on how to get these perfect I would love to know.

The miters on the bottom modeling that I cut by putting the blade at 90 deg and using the miter gage at 45 deg came out perfect though.
Looking good David! Keep up the good work!! I like your digital angle gage!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Finishing Up

Well, I finally got around to finishing up one of these. There wasn't a whole lot left to do from where I left off last time.

I planed the top down to just over 1/2" thick and cut it down to size and finished up the assembly:

From Valances

My miters were not perfect, so some wood epoxy and wood filler for the nail wholes did the trick.

From Valances

After giving everything a good sanding it was time for a few coats of paint, 3 coats of a spray on primer, 2 coats of white gloss enamel, and 2 coats of a gloss clear enamel

From Valances

From Valances

I still need to build one more of these, once I get that one finished and both are hung I'll post the finished project.
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,944 Posts
Finishing Up

Well, I finally got around to finishing up one of these. There wasn't a whole lot left to do from where I left off last time.

I planed the top down to just over 1/2" thick and cut it down to size and finished up the assembly:

From Valances

My miters were not perfect, so some wood epoxy and wood filler for the nail wholes did the trick.

From Valances

After giving everything a good sanding it was time for a few coats of paint, 3 coats of a spray on primer, 2 coats of white gloss enamel, and 2 coats of a gloss clear enamel

From Valances

From Valances

I still need to build one more of these, once I get that one finished and both are hung I'll post the finished project.
Those are looking good!! We are installing some windows in a few weeks, wanna come over and show me??
 
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