LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Part 1 - Leveling and adjusting the height

I built this utility cart a while back.


I had big plans for it but I set my planer on it and it's become a dedicated planer stand. The reason for this, it had a couple of design misses that prevented it from being any more useful than a planer stand.

First: The top shelf height. The magic number for my shop is 35-1/8", the height of my table saw. It was too low to use as any sort of support.

Second: The casters were uneven. Granted it set's on a concrete floor so you can only get it to set even in one place, and the one place was the top of my workbench the day that I made it.

The fix, adjustable casters.

The first step was to remount the casters. I planed and jointed one edge each of a piece of 2×8 and 2×4 and screwed them together. Next, I routed a 1/2" slot in the side of the cart to except a 5/16" carriage bolt that would bolt through the 2×8. This would give me about 1-1/2" of vertical adjustment.



The vertical adjustment was nice but it was still difficult to get it to set flat on the floor. So I installed a "jack bolt" on each corner. I just loosen the adjustment bolt for the high caster and crank the jack bolt until all four caster are setting on the floor. Easy peasy! I didn't even have to use a wrench. SWEET!



The next step, add a Flip-Up Ply Wood Rack like the one featured in American Woodworker.



When I read this article, I was taken aback by how similar their cart looked compared to mine. So adding the Flip-Up Ply Wood Rack should be easy. (Famous last words!) The plan is to make it so a full sheet of ply wood has it COG just above the hinge. That way I can use gravity to my advantage when flipping it over. Because I scabbed a 2×4 onto the side of the 2×8, it left me with a nice ledge that I can use. I plan to add a sheet of ply on the ledge so that I can put a bag of sand down there for a counter weight. Again, we'll have to see how it all comes together.

Until next time,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,038 Posts
Part 1 - Leveling and adjusting the height

I built this utility cart a while back.


I had big plans for it but I set my planer on it and it's become a dedicated planer stand. The reason for this, it had a couple of design misses that prevented it from being any more useful than a planer stand.

First: The top shelf height. The magic number for my shop is 35-1/8", the height of my table saw. It was too low to use as any sort of support.

Second: The casters were uneven. Granted it set's on a concrete floor so you can only get it to set even in one place, and the one place was the top of my workbench the day that I made it.

The fix, adjustable casters.

The first step was to remount the casters. I planed and jointed one edge each of a piece of 2×8 and 2×4 and screwed them together. Next, I routed a 1/2" slot in the side of the cart to except a 5/16" carriage bolt that would bolt through the 2×8. This would give me about 1-1/2" of vertical adjustment.



The vertical adjustment was nice but it was still difficult to get it to set flat on the floor. So I installed a "jack bolt" on each corner. I just loosen the adjustment bolt for the high caster and crank the jack bolt until all four caster are setting on the floor. Easy peasy! I didn't even have to use a wrench. SWEET!



The next step, add a Flip-Up Ply Wood Rack like the one featured in American Woodworker.



When I read this article, I was taken aback by how similar their cart looked compared to mine. So adding the Flip-Up Ply Wood Rack should be easy. (Famous last words!) The plan is to make it so a full sheet of ply wood has it COG just above the hinge. That way I can use gravity to my advantage when flipping it over. Because I scabbed a 2×4 onto the side of the 2×8, it left me with a nice ledge that I can use. I plan to add a sheet of ply on the ledge so that I can put a bag of sand down there for a counter weight. Again, we'll have to see how it all comes together.

Until next time,
Hmmmmm…..wonder if you could set the planer underneath to use it as ballast? I want a movable stand for my planer, but can always use the extra table space also. And not sure that I want the flip-top version. Will be watching this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Part 1 - Leveling and adjusting the height

I built this utility cart a while back.


I had big plans for it but I set my planer on it and it's become a dedicated planer stand. The reason for this, it had a couple of design misses that prevented it from being any more useful than a planer stand.

First: The top shelf height. The magic number for my shop is 35-1/8", the height of my table saw. It was too low to use as any sort of support.

Second: The casters were uneven. Granted it set's on a concrete floor so you can only get it to set even in one place, and the one place was the top of my workbench the day that I made it.

The fix, adjustable casters.

The first step was to remount the casters. I planed and jointed one edge each of a piece of 2×8 and 2×4 and screwed them together. Next, I routed a 1/2" slot in the side of the cart to except a 5/16" carriage bolt that would bolt through the 2×8. This would give me about 1-1/2" of vertical adjustment.



The vertical adjustment was nice but it was still difficult to get it to set flat on the floor. So I installed a "jack bolt" on each corner. I just loosen the adjustment bolt for the high caster and crank the jack bolt until all four caster are setting on the floor. Easy peasy! I didn't even have to use a wrench. SWEET!



The next step, add a Flip-Up Ply Wood Rack like the one featured in American Woodworker.



When I read this article, I was taken aback by how similar their cart looked compared to mine. So adding the Flip-Up Ply Wood Rack should be easy. (Famous last words!) The plan is to make it so a full sheet of ply wood has it COG just above the hinge. That way I can use gravity to my advantage when flipping it over. Because I scabbed a 2×4 onto the side of the 2×8, it left me with a nice ledge that I can use. I plan to add a sheet of ply on the ledge so that I can put a bag of sand down there for a counter weight. Again, we'll have to see how it all comes together.

Until next time,
Man, putting the planer on the bottom shelf would be best! Unfortunately the planer is too tall. I might be able to reduce the width of the upper rail and slide it in then, don't know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Part 2 - Flip-Up Plywood Rack

I finished up Part II of the Utility Cart Mods tonight. I added the Flip-Up Plywood Rack to the side of the cart.
Table Wood Tire Wheel Gas


The Flip-Up is just a 24×30 piece of 1/2" AC Ply. I stopped by the tool store after work and picked up a short of Oak for $1.00. I needed a piece of scrap to screw to the back of the ply so that the hinge screws would have something solid to bite into. I was a little concerned about the weight of a sheet of 3/4" MDF and the hinge screws not holding in the 1/2" ply.

Table Furniture Wood Flooring Gas


As you see from the pictures, after I got the Flip-Up mounted, it was at a bit of an angle. This caused the plywood to want to tip away from the cart.

So I came up this:

Dog Carnivore Wood Comfort Liver


I grabbed a scrap piece of 2×4 in the burn bin and attached an old butt hinge to it. Now when I need to move a sheet of ply, I can flip the 2×4 down. Now the plywood now leans into the cart and flips up so that I can make the cart a little more compact for storing. Much better. Looks like poo but it works. The only full sheet of ply that I have at the moment is laying flat on the saw horses and I really didn't feel like lifting 96lb onto the cart just to take a couple of pictures.

Wood Floor Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


I added a 70lb bag of sand to the underside for stability. 50lb would have worked but 70lb was all that Menards had. It added a load of stability to the cart.

It takes more work trying to keep the shop helper's butt out of the pictures than it does to actually attempt to build anything. Sorry about that.

I guess I'll call this one complete, for now.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
659 Posts
Part 2 - Flip-Up Plywood Rack

I finished up Part II of the Utility Cart Mods tonight. I added the Flip-Up Plywood Rack to the side of the cart.
Table Wood Tire Wheel Gas


The Flip-Up is just a 24×30 piece of 1/2" AC Ply. I stopped by the tool store after work and picked up a short of Oak for $1.00. I needed a piece of scrap to screw to the back of the ply so that the hinge screws would have something solid to bite into. I was a little concerned about the weight of a sheet of 3/4" MDF and the hinge screws not holding in the 1/2" ply.

Table Furniture Wood Flooring Gas


As you see from the pictures, after I got the Flip-Up mounted, it was at a bit of an angle. This caused the plywood to want to tip away from the cart.

So I came up this:

Dog Carnivore Wood Comfort Liver


I grabbed a scrap piece of 2×4 in the burn bin and attached an old butt hinge to it. Now when I need to move a sheet of ply, I can flip the 2×4 down. Now the plywood now leans into the cart and flips up so that I can make the cart a little more compact for storing. Much better. Looks like poo but it works. The only full sheet of ply that I have at the moment is laying flat on the saw horses and I really didn't feel like lifting 96lb onto the cart just to take a couple of pictures.

Wood Floor Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


I added a 70lb bag of sand to the underside for stability. 50lb would have worked but 70lb was all that Menards had. It added a load of stability to the cart.

It takes more work trying to keep the shop helper's butt out of the pictures than it does to actually attempt to build anything. Sorry about that.

I guess I'll call this one complete, for now.
looks like a great cart with a lot of uses around the shop
I like your shop helper
don't keep him out of the pictures lol
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In use ...

Well I've been using the newly modify utility cart now for sometime now. I've gotten a lot of use out of it the last couple of weeks and I have to say that it works great!

I just built some upper cabinets for my shop, can never have too much storage eh? And I can tell you that my back loves the cart! Because it's now the same height as the table saw, the out feed table / assembly table, et al. in the shop, I don't really have to lift anything. I can just slide it off of the out feed table, onto the cart and move it right over the to the base cabinets. Then slide it off of the cart and onto the cabinets. Man it sure is nice.

I've been using it as an in feed support for pis and a side support for long cross cuts at the table saw too. Again, it works great.

The only down side, and no fault of the cart just a shop that could stand a few more square feet, is that when using the flip up portion of the cart, navigating a full 8 foot sheet of ply through the shop door is a real challenge. It's not impossible to say the least but there's only one way that I can get the sheet through the door and turned w/out hitting the door jam or the side of the table saw. It's a tight fit.

All in all, I'm calling this one DONE!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In use ...

Well I've been using the newly modify utility cart now for sometime now. I've gotten a lot of use out of it the last couple of weeks and I have to say that it works great!

I just built some upper cabinets for my shop, can never have too much storage eh? And I can tell you that my back loves the cart! Because it's now the same height as the table saw, the out feed table / assembly table, et al. in the shop, I don't really have to lift anything. I can just slide it off of the out feed table, onto the cart and move it right over the to the base cabinets. Then slide it off of the cart and onto the cabinets. Man it sure is nice.

I've been using it as an in feed support for pis and a side support for long cross cuts at the table saw too. Again, it works great.

The only down side, and no fault of the cart just a shop that could stand a few more square feet, is that when using the flip up portion of the cart, navigating a full 8 foot sheet of ply through the shop door is a real challenge. It's not impossible to say the least but there's only one way that I can get the sheet through the door and turned w/out hitting the door jam or the side of the table saw. It's a tight fit.

All in all, I'm calling this one DONE!
Here's a shot of the cart with a, mostly full, sheet of 3/4" MDF on it. You can see how it's a little tight trying to maneuver it around in a small shop.

Wood Lectern Hardwood Gas Wood stain
 

Attachments

1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top