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I bought some wood today (I'll do another post on that), and the guy threw in a 10 ft x 8 piece of reclaimed 8/4 poplar, suitably darkened with the saw marks still on it. I assume if cleaned up, it would look a bit like this oak:


I don't really want to use this for anything, at least on our main floor, but for a place were it would be appropriate, I think it will work pretty well. I would think a coffee or side table would be the best applications for such wood.

Having never worked with wood in this way, I'm open to any and all advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This poplar is old and doesn't look anything like poplar in color at this point. I'll post a pic-much darker than new poplar.
 

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Only advice I can offer when working with reclaimed wood is to check for nails or screws, or staples, heaven knows what got into it over the years. Any number of saw blade eating nasties can be hiding just under the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've already spotted a couple of nails on one end-pretty good sized ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So here's a pic of the wood the cleaner section in the middle of the pic is where I used my block plane on it a bit when I was trying to see what it was.
Road surface Wood Asphalt Automotive tire Flooring
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The fellow said it was poplar. I said that I did not think it was, since it didn't look anything like any poplar I'd ever seen-hence the beginning of the planing. Then I realized I was going to have to go deeper than I wanted to see more. However, it is light weight like poplar.

In other words, got me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Denny, that looks like a pretty good thought. The weight is almost identical to poplar, and the grain sure looks like the pics.
 

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Charles, if they don't have easy access to the county extension agent, take a sample over to the university.
I know when I lived in the area that Jefferson county extension got me some priority at U of L.
About 35 years ago my father in law had to cut down a tree to allow the state to expand Corydon Pike in New Albany. We knew it was American Chestnut, but needed to make certain so we took samples all over to see what we could find out.
It turns out it was protected, but the state HAD to have the land, so we weren't prosecuted for cutting it down.
The wood you have really looks like the same wood to me.

http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/chestnut.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm not sure how much work I'm going to do to identify this one board, but it is interesting. If this is Chestnut, and it was used in the construction of a house or building (can't remember right now), then it is probably 100+ years old, wouldn't you think?
 

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You bet! At least 100 years old.
Those are extremely tight lines for American Chestnut. I would expect it to be closer to quite a bit before 1900. After that, pumps, irrigation, and wild fertilization became common, (using a Chestnut for a poop spot), (according to my FiL's father, lol).
I got to cut up a few American Chestnuts on the Woodmizer, but all that I cut was newer stuff with larger rings.
 
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