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Hello,

I've recently come across a rockwell table saw 34-711. SN: LH-178. It is being sold for $350, but he says the saw has frozen bearings. It does have some surface rust on the table top and I wasn't able to test it out due to the bearings.

I could clean the surface rust pretty easily, I'm looking for a tablesaw that I can keep forever at a decent price.

I'm wondering if this is worth purchasing for an overhaul. It comes with original rails and fence, which i'll probably replace later on down the line. I figure I'll need to buy a phase converter and a 230v extension cord since it'll be run from the dryer outlet.

Motor vehicle Wood Font Gas Automotive tire


Font Gas Rectangle Art Auto part


Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Anthony
 

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Bearing are pretty easy to replace and cheap. Surface rust is a non-issue. The bearings are even easier to replace than on a single phase motor, but you will need a VFD to run it on your home 230V power, so figure another $200 or so for that. The Jet Lock fence (if that is what it has) is not all that bad either, although the T-square purists will tell you otherwise. The UniFence is even better as it is more versatile.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Use the 'frozen bearings' angle as a negotiation point to try and lower the price. A non-working machine with surface rust is a hard sell, so use that to your advantage.
 

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Is it the saw or the motor that has frozen bearings? If it's the motor, it might be better to replace the 3 ph motor with a single phase motor. A VFD will reduce your power to 2/3. 3 hp will become 2 hp. I would offer $200 - 250. After all, it doesn't run.
 

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A VFD will reduce your power to 2/3. 3 hp will become 2 hp.

Not true. A 3HP motor will remain a 3HP motor. And you get some additional advantages you won't have with a single phase machine (soft start and electronic braking for example).

Cheers,
Brad
 

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I don't think I would pay $350 for that saw. By the time you repair/rebuild, clean things up, and replace the fence you will have enough invested to have bought a turn key saw. Not saying it can't be done, and it would be a nice saw…just think economically I would keep looking.
 

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A VFD will reduce your power to 2/3. 3 hp will become 2 hp.

Not true. A 3HP motor will remain a 3HP motor. And you get some additional advantages you won t have with a single phase machine (soft start and electronic braking for example).

- MrUnix
My understanding is that the horsepower and torque will vary with the frequency applied. The two will be at the listed rating for the motor at the original mains frequency (60 Hz in the US). Below that the horsepower drops and above it the torque drops.

http://www.pumpsandsystems.com/topics/pumps/motor-horsepower-torque-versus-vfd-frequency
 

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Most don't because most can't. The ads for Shopsmiths mention the variable speed capability of the table saw configuration as a positive feature. Some high end sliding saws like Baleigh sliders offer multiple arbor speeds. If Anthony chooses to run his saw at less than 60 Hz he will have less horsepower.

Me, I am a single speed kind of guy.
 

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Most don't because most can't. [...] If Anthony chooses to run his saw at less than 60 Hz he will have less horsepower.

LOL - Yeah, I guess it would be possible… however, I don't know of many reasons a typical woodworker would want to run it slower, while I can think of several reasons why they wouldn't - Not the least being most TEFC motor manufacturers warn not to run the motor outside +/- 5% of it's combined voltage/frequency (or +/- 10% of either voltage or frequency). ODP motors as typically found on drill presses and lathes however are different, so it is very common to use the variable frequency in those situations (and usually in combination with stepped pulleys for various speed ranges, similar to those $11K and up Baliegh sliders you mentioned) . But like telling a child not to stick stuff in the wall outlet, it usually just makes them want to do it even more :)

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Is it the saw or the motor that has frozen bearings? If it s the motor, it might be better to replace the 3 ph motor with a single phase motor. A VFD will reduce your power to 2/3. 3 hp will become 2 hp. I would offer $200 - 250. After all, it doesn t run.

- MrRon
I agree that if it is the motor then just replace it with a new one , but if it is on the table it's self I would say no unless your really into repairing machines. For me I don't like to have to fix something I just paid for.
 

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Thanks for the info, original price was $350, he came down to $300. We tested the motor and it works great. Prettiy silent compared to what I'm use to (dewalt portable). He also cleaned everything up pretty nice before I picked it up. He also threw in a static phase converter for free. Being here in Hawaii it's difficult to find unisaws or the like.

I have seen a used bisieymeyer fence for around $125 is that a decent price?

The only way I'll be able to hook up to 230V is through the dryer connection into the phase converter that I'll mount on the saw. I'm not too sure about the schematics on how to write it. I'll take some pictures and post them up. If anyone can help out it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Anthony
 

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The only time I ever thought about wanting a different speed was with an Oldham 60 tooth carbide blade I have had for many years. As it came up to speed it created a piercing shrill whistle. It cut very well, but was annoying to use. I actually quit and bought some other blades. Come to think of it, I haven't tried it since I upgraded from my old Delta contractor's saw to my Sawstop cabinet model. I may be back in business.

Note Added: I had to go down to the shop and give it a try. No joy. That blade just screams. No run out or other issues, it is just scary loud.
 

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I have seen a used bisieymeyer fence for around $125 us that a decent price?

Yes, they are almost 4 times that new with rails. What fence is on it now? There is nothing wrong with a Jet Lock or UniFence, so you might want to give it a try before investing more. You should also consider replacing the bearings regardless (and belts if they look questionable) Cheap insurance and could prevent a lot of expensive damage in the future… much more expensive than the cost of bearings (and they are easy to replace).

You did pretty good… Congratulations and welcome to the Unisaw Club.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks Brad, the belts were really worn so I picked up some replacement belts from NAPA. Hopefully I can get some bearings this week. I wanted to add a 230V outlet in the garage but I'm not sure it'll be allowed in military housing. How would I go about making an extension cord from the phase converter to the dryer outlet. I've done some basic wiring so I should be capable of hooking everything up with some help. If not I'll probably hire a qualified electrician.

Should I spend extra on a rotary phase converter or will the static one work well enough for now?
 

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Should I spend extra on a rotary phase converter or will the static one work well enough for now?

No need for an RPC… overkill for a single machine (and expensive). The SPC will power your saw a bit less than it's rated HP, but it probably won't even be noticed. It might make a difference if you are ripping really thick, heavy (or really wet) stock all the time… in which case, a VFD would probably be more economical and give you some additional features. Use it (you already have it!) and decide.. no rush to do anything yet at this point!

As for the extension cord.. no problem. You can get all you need at the BORG. I run my Millermatic 210 welder off a 50 foot extension cord I made myself from stock parts. Figure out the amp draw on the motor (should be listed on the data plate) and just size the wiring accordingly based on that and how long you will make the cord; and maybe go up a size in wire just in case ;)

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Pick up a dryer cord end to match your dryer receptacle . You could even get a 6' dryer cord off the shelf. Just match the specs on your dryer receptacle. It'll either be a 125/250v 30A 3 prong or 4 prong. If not, just buy the individual cord end to match your dryer receptacle and get whatever length cord you need, #10 awg, and 1 wire per prong on your dryer receptacle.

I typically use SJ cord (it may be called SJOOW on the reel) or SO (SOOW) for tools, lights, appliances or whatever I need it for.

SJ is rated for 300v I believe.

SO is rated for 600v I believe and has thicker insulation.

Either one will work fine. You could use Romex or any other #10 cable for that matter, but a flexible tool cord like SJ is usually the go to.
 
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