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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
 

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Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
I own a Delta drum sander and have never built my own but there is one recommendation I could make. That's to have the drum raise up and down rather than the table. The problem with having the table move is that it's really difficult to use additional supports. Every time the table is adjusted between passes the supports have to be adjusted also. That makes it a real painful and difficult process for long pieces. I'll never buy a drum sander like that again and I'll probobly put mine up for sale in the near future so I can get one with a drum that moves. Anyways, good luck and I hope your project is successful.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
I think all of the thickness sanders (as opposed to Sand Flee type sanders) I have seen shop built elevate the table instead of the drum. My concern with raising / lowering the drum instead, is the need to raise / lower the motor as well, or lose belt tension… But it IS something worth considering…
 

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Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
I don't think it woudl be that much harder to build the drum to move instead of the table. Turn you thinking over, Basicly place the motor and drum assembly on a table and move them up and down inside of a box, the top of the box is your table, instead of movind a table up and down over a drum and motor in a box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
Alex, that is sort of what I was thinking… Kind of like an enclosed Sand Flee with a moveable table above the drum… I may be totally off on my thinking but that is what leapt to mind…
 

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Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
i built a 16" drum sander last summer to sand end grain cutting boards. i used 3" schedule 40 plastic pipe for the drum with a movable table. it works better than i had hoped for. i have had no problems with the drum or table. when i have a lot of cutting boards to sand this machine will run for 2 or 3 hours at a time. i had woried about heat built up on the drum to start with. that is not a problem. light passes is the key. i used a 1/2 hp motor. no problem there either. keep your design simple and you will be rewarded with a great machine. i had less than $ 100 in it. used mostly what i had laying around the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
Aside from the pillow block bearings, and velcro backed sandpaper rolls, I have everything I need I believe…

-- Tons of SYP 2xs and birch plywood.
-- 3/4" and / or 5/8" all thread, nuts, washers etc…
-- Did I mention birch plywood?
-- 1 HP HF bandsaw motor. (Swapped mine out for a Dayton 1.5 HP unit)
-- Link belt. Not sure I have enough, but I do have link belt…

I honestly don't think I am all that worried about a moveable table versus moveable drum. Moving the table seems a FAR easier solution, with less possibility for error.
 

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Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
you can get 3/4 pillow block bearings from NORTHERN TOOL for $6.oo and the velco and sandpaper rolls from SUPER GRIT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Inspiration, starting the design process...

I've been pretty much in awe of the talent, and creativity that flows from the shops of many of the members here. I have recently had projects that needed a LOT of hand planing, and sanding, and the size, or grain orientation of the project precluded running the piece through my 13" bench top planer… A wide drum sander would be perfect!

But they are oh so expensive! What to do?

Build my own! But how?

So I started browsing through the project posts, looking at your shop designed and built wide drum sanders, some of them are a little on the smallish side, I have seen one that had a 12" wide drum, not up to the task I need… But many others over 18", I believe I saw one at 32" even!

After looking at the various designs, I found the following things seemed pretty consistent about the designs.

#1. The drum itself is usually a drum of plastic pipe, stiffened with wood "donuts" or a wooden cylinder with a through hole for a metal axle rod. I have durability concerns with the plastic pipe approach, and I have a lathe…. I think the wood cylinder approach is more appropriate for me…

#2. While not universal, it seems that most of the designs feature a smallish power tool motor (usually 3/4 HP 110V) that is mounted on a hinged board, the weight of the motor, pulling down in an arc away from the hinge provides tension on the belt. Seems simple and effective enough.

#3. The dust hood is usually a box that covers over the top of the drum, and has a port in it for a dust hose. Simple, effective.

#4. The thickness adjustment is usually done by raising and lowering the table / bed worksurface. The simplest mechanism I have seen hinged the bed on one end, and lifted the other end.

#5. The drum / axle usually rides on a set of bearings that are captured in some kind of bracket…

(Photo from Yorkshire Stewart's project post...)

As it sits, I am sketching up the design, basically a larger version of Yorkshire Stewart's project (I want 24" width capacity, his is 18" I think…).

Those that have built their own wide drum sanders… I could sure use your advice. I have never built my own machine from scratch before.

I will post the Sketchup files and 2D shots of the project as I get further along… Just fishing for helpful ideas at this point!
Thank you! I was wondering where to find the pillow block bearings… There is a Northern Tool by my Father In Law's place… I will be by there this weekend! Woo Hoo!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A short listing of shop projects I have planned, and their statuses...

#1. Wide Drum Sander. Picked up the all thread from Home Depot, and the pillow block bearings from Northern Tool. The design keeps fluctuating and due to the points where things can go bad fast… I have decided on moving the table to the drum, instead of the other way around. Any mechanism I have been able to come up with for raising and lowering the drum / motor to the table abounds with points of failure. I am not sold on any one design yet,.. If I run across anything that can convince me otherwise before I start buying materials, I will gladly reconsider my position….

#2. Lathe stand tool / ballast cabinet. I have the cabinet itself done as far as the design is concerned. And the drawers mostly done, but need to decide if I am going with wood slides, or if I am going to be using ball bearing slides. That will change the width of the drawers. I have noticed my local Home Depot has a sale on 3/4" cabinet grade ply for $27.99 right now… Need to pick a couple of sheets of that, and half inch up…

#3. Air Cleaner. Got the "Complete Small Shop" book from August Home Publications, plan on using their plans… Only problem I am having is sourcing up a squirrel cage blower. Most of the AC shops I talk to don't want to talk to me unless I want to buy a brand new system… I may end up buying a PSI AC620 instead..

The lathe cabinet will be my first solo built cabinet, first drawers, etc… I am pretty excited about getting started, I just hope I am doing this right. I guess we will all find out…

Each new project builds the skills back up, and reduces stress. This is all a good thing…
 

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A short listing of shop projects I have planned, and their statuses...

#1. Wide Drum Sander. Picked up the all thread from Home Depot, and the pillow block bearings from Northern Tool. The design keeps fluctuating and due to the points where things can go bad fast… I have decided on moving the table to the drum, instead of the other way around. Any mechanism I have been able to come up with for raising and lowering the drum / motor to the table abounds with points of failure. I am not sold on any one design yet,.. If I run across anything that can convince me otherwise before I start buying materials, I will gladly reconsider my position….

#2. Lathe stand tool / ballast cabinet. I have the cabinet itself done as far as the design is concerned. And the drawers mostly done, but need to decide if I am going with wood slides, or if I am going to be using ball bearing slides. That will change the width of the drawers. I have noticed my local Home Depot has a sale on 3/4" cabinet grade ply for $27.99 right now… Need to pick a couple of sheets of that, and half inch up…

#3. Air Cleaner. Got the "Complete Small Shop" book from August Home Publications, plan on using their plans… Only problem I am having is sourcing up a squirrel cage blower. Most of the AC shops I talk to don't want to talk to me unless I want to buy a brand new system… I may end up buying a PSI AC620 instead..

The lathe cabinet will be my first solo built cabinet, first drawers, etc… I am pretty excited about getting started, I just hope I am doing this right. I guess we will all find out…

Each new project builds the skills back up, and reduces stress. This is all a good thing…
I hand the OCD crown back to you …..............(-:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A short listing of shop projects I have planned, and their statuses...

#1. Wide Drum Sander. Picked up the all thread from Home Depot, and the pillow block bearings from Northern Tool. The design keeps fluctuating and due to the points where things can go bad fast… I have decided on moving the table to the drum, instead of the other way around. Any mechanism I have been able to come up with for raising and lowering the drum / motor to the table abounds with points of failure. I am not sold on any one design yet,.. If I run across anything that can convince me otherwise before I start buying materials, I will gladly reconsider my position….

#2. Lathe stand tool / ballast cabinet. I have the cabinet itself done as far as the design is concerned. And the drawers mostly done, but need to decide if I am going with wood slides, or if I am going to be using ball bearing slides. That will change the width of the drawers. I have noticed my local Home Depot has a sale on 3/4" cabinet grade ply for $27.99 right now… Need to pick a couple of sheets of that, and half inch up…

#3. Air Cleaner. Got the "Complete Small Shop" book from August Home Publications, plan on using their plans… Only problem I am having is sourcing up a squirrel cage blower. Most of the AC shops I talk to don't want to talk to me unless I want to buy a brand new system… I may end up buying a PSI AC620 instead..

The lathe cabinet will be my first solo built cabinet, first drawers, etc… I am pretty excited about getting started, I just hope I am doing this right. I guess we will all find out…

Each new project builds the skills back up, and reduces stress. This is all a good thing…
I work with engineers… Need I say more?
 

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A short listing of shop projects I have planned, and their statuses...

#1. Wide Drum Sander. Picked up the all thread from Home Depot, and the pillow block bearings from Northern Tool. The design keeps fluctuating and due to the points where things can go bad fast… I have decided on moving the table to the drum, instead of the other way around. Any mechanism I have been able to come up with for raising and lowering the drum / motor to the table abounds with points of failure. I am not sold on any one design yet,.. If I run across anything that can convince me otherwise before I start buying materials, I will gladly reconsider my position….

#2. Lathe stand tool / ballast cabinet. I have the cabinet itself done as far as the design is concerned. And the drawers mostly done, but need to decide if I am going with wood slides, or if I am going to be using ball bearing slides. That will change the width of the drawers. I have noticed my local Home Depot has a sale on 3/4" cabinet grade ply for $27.99 right now… Need to pick a couple of sheets of that, and half inch up…

#3. Air Cleaner. Got the "Complete Small Shop" book from August Home Publications, plan on using their plans… Only problem I am having is sourcing up a squirrel cage blower. Most of the AC shops I talk to don't want to talk to me unless I want to buy a brand new system… I may end up buying a PSI AC620 instead..

The lathe cabinet will be my first solo built cabinet, first drawers, etc… I am pretty excited about getting started, I just hope I am doing this right. I guess we will all find out…

Each new project builds the skills back up, and reduces stress. This is all a good thing…
Refresh my memory on how you are going to add ballast, I think that was one of your motives in the lathe cabinet construction. And are you using the the metal stand legs, or are you reconstructing the whole thing from the lathe bed down?

Re the drum sander. I can't remember doing anything that complex, at least not in recent memory. I would worry about wood versus metal in terms of durability and maintaining settings, guess I would want to do it with a lot of metal in it, even if it were angle iron and rod. Angle iron, bolts and nuts…........I have built some rugged items over the years using that construction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A short listing of shop projects I have planned, and their statuses...

#1. Wide Drum Sander. Picked up the all thread from Home Depot, and the pillow block bearings from Northern Tool. The design keeps fluctuating and due to the points where things can go bad fast… I have decided on moving the table to the drum, instead of the other way around. Any mechanism I have been able to come up with for raising and lowering the drum / motor to the table abounds with points of failure. I am not sold on any one design yet,.. If I run across anything that can convince me otherwise before I start buying materials, I will gladly reconsider my position….

#2. Lathe stand tool / ballast cabinet. I have the cabinet itself done as far as the design is concerned. And the drawers mostly done, but need to decide if I am going with wood slides, or if I am going to be using ball bearing slides. That will change the width of the drawers. I have noticed my local Home Depot has a sale on 3/4" cabinet grade ply for $27.99 right now… Need to pick a couple of sheets of that, and half inch up…

#3. Air Cleaner. Got the "Complete Small Shop" book from August Home Publications, plan on using their plans… Only problem I am having is sourcing up a squirrel cage blower. Most of the AC shops I talk to don't want to talk to me unless I want to buy a brand new system… I may end up buying a PSI AC620 instead..

The lathe cabinet will be my first solo built cabinet, first drawers, etc… I am pretty excited about getting started, I just hope I am doing this right. I guess we will all find out…

Each new project builds the skills back up, and reduces stress. This is all a good thing…
Stand cabinet is going to simply be a cabinet, built to be bolted to the stand. Ballast will be via sand in the bottom compartment of the cabinet. I believe 2 #80 bags will fit…

I have considered building an entirely new base with a built in cabinet, but that sort of defeats part of the purpose of building this cab, which is to get practice building something along the lines of a regular cabinet, which I can then take those skills to the kitchen remodel…

After all, there is a madness to my method, uh I mean… oh forget it…
 

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A short listing of shop projects I have planned, and their statuses...

#1. Wide Drum Sander. Picked up the all thread from Home Depot, and the pillow block bearings from Northern Tool. The design keeps fluctuating and due to the points where things can go bad fast… I have decided on moving the table to the drum, instead of the other way around. Any mechanism I have been able to come up with for raising and lowering the drum / motor to the table abounds with points of failure. I am not sold on any one design yet,.. If I run across anything that can convince me otherwise before I start buying materials, I will gladly reconsider my position….

#2. Lathe stand tool / ballast cabinet. I have the cabinet itself done as far as the design is concerned. And the drawers mostly done, but need to decide if I am going with wood slides, or if I am going to be using ball bearing slides. That will change the width of the drawers. I have noticed my local Home Depot has a sale on 3/4" cabinet grade ply for $27.99 right now… Need to pick a couple of sheets of that, and half inch up…

#3. Air Cleaner. Got the "Complete Small Shop" book from August Home Publications, plan on using their plans… Only problem I am having is sourcing up a squirrel cage blower. Most of the AC shops I talk to don't want to talk to me unless I want to buy a brand new system… I may end up buying a PSI AC620 instead..

The lathe cabinet will be my first solo built cabinet, first drawers, etc… I am pretty excited about getting started, I just hope I am doing this right. I guess we will all find out…

Each new project builds the skills back up, and reduces stress. This is all a good thing…
As far as "sourcing up a squirrel cage blower" try locating an HVAC shop near you. During the late summer months, they replace a lot of furnaces. I managed to pick up a lot of good motors from their scrap pile, some of which I had to remove from squirrel cage blowers for forced air furnaces. I just had to beat the scrapper there.
 

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A short listing of shop projects I have planned, and their statuses...

#1. Wide Drum Sander. Picked up the all thread from Home Depot, and the pillow block bearings from Northern Tool. The design keeps fluctuating and due to the points where things can go bad fast… I have decided on moving the table to the drum, instead of the other way around. Any mechanism I have been able to come up with for raising and lowering the drum / motor to the table abounds with points of failure. I am not sold on any one design yet,.. If I run across anything that can convince me otherwise before I start buying materials, I will gladly reconsider my position….

#2. Lathe stand tool / ballast cabinet. I have the cabinet itself done as far as the design is concerned. And the drawers mostly done, but need to decide if I am going with wood slides, or if I am going to be using ball bearing slides. That will change the width of the drawers. I have noticed my local Home Depot has a sale on 3/4" cabinet grade ply for $27.99 right now… Need to pick a couple of sheets of that, and half inch up…

#3. Air Cleaner. Got the "Complete Small Shop" book from August Home Publications, plan on using their plans… Only problem I am having is sourcing up a squirrel cage blower. Most of the AC shops I talk to don't want to talk to me unless I want to buy a brand new system… I may end up buying a PSI AC620 instead..

The lathe cabinet will be my first solo built cabinet, first drawers, etc… I am pretty excited about getting started, I just hope I am doing this right. I guess we will all find out…

Each new project builds the skills back up, and reduces stress. This is all a good thing…
Sounds good, work on something not on display to gain skills. I think you described the ballast before, I forgot.

Been a quiet day here, I took a few pics of the cafe we went to, we really aren't doing a lot of the scenic stuff here on Maui, have done it many times before. We will take a few excursions before our stay is done, however…..........
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So many projects I want to do, so many design descisions, so little time or money...

I just realized going over my Sketchup, and my physical sketchbook, that I realized, I better get busy, and have a TON of budget to get through these projects… So far my big, need to do soon projects are…

#1. Wide Drum sander. This has actually started. The disks for the drum are halfway done. (24 of 32 needed are cut out. I still need to come up with pulleys, rods, and pillow block bearings. This will be a simple pivot table lift mechanism , nothing too terribly fancy. The hard part will will be the drum anyway, and once that is done, I can start over in a different direction utilizing the same drum. I am opting for a 3/4" shaft on this

#2. Lathe stand cabinet. This honestly hasn't been a top priority, but it should be. I REALLY need a proper method of storing my chuck, faceplate, turning tools, etc… I have a rough design in Sketchup, but I am not having a lot of luck with drawing up the drawers for some reason…

#3. Wall storage cabinet. I need to design storage cabs that will hold all the junk that is presently on my peg board, as well as hold my hardware bins, router bit cabinets etc… I have a couple of designs, and am closing in on the one that should offer me the space I want. Based loosely on the wall cabinets in the most recent Shop Notes, I figure on building them deep and wide enough I can house 2 of the hardware cabinets side by side behind the fold out doors. The fold out doors would be built with the peg board per the plan, and used as shown in Shop Notes…

#4. This is going to sound a bit strange, but I am thinking I want to build a mobile lumber rack. I have been looking into several designs lately… Not thrilled with any of them…

#5. I need to rework my current clamp rack system. It works, but isn't ideal…
 

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So many projects I want to do, so many design descisions, so little time or money...

I just realized going over my Sketchup, and my physical sketchbook, that I realized, I better get busy, and have a TON of budget to get through these projects… So far my big, need to do soon projects are…

#1. Wide Drum sander. This has actually started. The disks for the drum are halfway done. (24 of 32 needed are cut out. I still need to come up with pulleys, rods, and pillow block bearings. This will be a simple pivot table lift mechanism , nothing too terribly fancy. The hard part will will be the drum anyway, and once that is done, I can start over in a different direction utilizing the same drum. I am opting for a 3/4" shaft on this

#2. Lathe stand cabinet. This honestly hasn't been a top priority, but it should be. I REALLY need a proper method of storing my chuck, faceplate, turning tools, etc… I have a rough design in Sketchup, but I am not having a lot of luck with drawing up the drawers for some reason…

#3. Wall storage cabinet. I need to design storage cabs that will hold all the junk that is presently on my peg board, as well as hold my hardware bins, router bit cabinets etc… I have a couple of designs, and am closing in on the one that should offer me the space I want. Based loosely on the wall cabinets in the most recent Shop Notes, I figure on building them deep and wide enough I can house 2 of the hardware cabinets side by side behind the fold out doors. The fold out doors would be built with the peg board per the plan, and used as shown in Shop Notes…

#4. This is going to sound a bit strange, but I am thinking I want to build a mobile lumber rack. I have been looking into several designs lately… Not thrilled with any of them…

#5. I need to rework my current clamp rack system. It works, but isn't ideal…
thats it ? only 3….

you better not see my sketchup folder… it's a project by itself just browsing through it.

we'll ALWAYS have high priority projects in a long list. just have to decide which gets top priority at the moment ,and go for it. one at a time you'll keep on updating that list :)

looking forward to some progress
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So many projects I want to do, so many design descisions, so little time or money...

I just realized going over my Sketchup, and my physical sketchbook, that I realized, I better get busy, and have a TON of budget to get through these projects… So far my big, need to do soon projects are…

#1. Wide Drum sander. This has actually started. The disks for the drum are halfway done. (24 of 32 needed are cut out. I still need to come up with pulleys, rods, and pillow block bearings. This will be a simple pivot table lift mechanism , nothing too terribly fancy. The hard part will will be the drum anyway, and once that is done, I can start over in a different direction utilizing the same drum. I am opting for a 3/4" shaft on this

#2. Lathe stand cabinet. This honestly hasn't been a top priority, but it should be. I REALLY need a proper method of storing my chuck, faceplate, turning tools, etc… I have a rough design in Sketchup, but I am not having a lot of luck with drawing up the drawers for some reason…

#3. Wall storage cabinet. I need to design storage cabs that will hold all the junk that is presently on my peg board, as well as hold my hardware bins, router bit cabinets etc… I have a couple of designs, and am closing in on the one that should offer me the space I want. Based loosely on the wall cabinets in the most recent Shop Notes, I figure on building them deep and wide enough I can house 2 of the hardware cabinets side by side behind the fold out doors. The fold out doors would be built with the peg board per the plan, and used as shown in Shop Notes…

#4. This is going to sound a bit strange, but I am thinking I want to build a mobile lumber rack. I have been looking into several designs lately… Not thrilled with any of them…

#5. I need to rework my current clamp rack system. It works, but isn't ideal…
Nah, I clicked submit too fast… I am adding on to that…
 

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So many projects I want to do, so many design descisions, so little time or money...

I just realized going over my Sketchup, and my physical sketchbook, that I realized, I better get busy, and have a TON of budget to get through these projects… So far my big, need to do soon projects are…

#1. Wide Drum sander. This has actually started. The disks for the drum are halfway done. (24 of 32 needed are cut out. I still need to come up with pulleys, rods, and pillow block bearings. This will be a simple pivot table lift mechanism , nothing too terribly fancy. The hard part will will be the drum anyway, and once that is done, I can start over in a different direction utilizing the same drum. I am opting for a 3/4" shaft on this

#2. Lathe stand cabinet. This honestly hasn't been a top priority, but it should be. I REALLY need a proper method of storing my chuck, faceplate, turning tools, etc… I have a rough design in Sketchup, but I am not having a lot of luck with drawing up the drawers for some reason…

#3. Wall storage cabinet. I need to design storage cabs that will hold all the junk that is presently on my peg board, as well as hold my hardware bins, router bit cabinets etc… I have a couple of designs, and am closing in on the one that should offer me the space I want. Based loosely on the wall cabinets in the most recent Shop Notes, I figure on building them deep and wide enough I can house 2 of the hardware cabinets side by side behind the fold out doors. The fold out doors would be built with the peg board per the plan, and used as shown in Shop Notes…

#4. This is going to sound a bit strange, but I am thinking I want to build a mobile lumber rack. I have been looking into several designs lately… Not thrilled with any of them…

#5. I need to rework my current clamp rack system. It works, but isn't ideal…
I have so many projects to do that I could spend the next 6 months just doing Sketchup drawings….....(-:

I don't think I will live long enough to do them all, so I least I won't be bored…..............
 
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