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A while back I had a guy to e-mail me through my woodworking website asking about the identity of a very old woodworking machine of some type. He inclosed the attached pictures of the machine.


Old Machine 4
Old Machine 3
Old Machine 2
Old Machine 1

On the bottom piece across and between the two legs is the following: C.B. Rogers &Co. Norwich Ct. Pat Sept 1, 1868.

I responded to him that I had never seen anything like this and couldn't be of much help but told him I would see if anyone on LJ could help identify the machine…...so here's my shot. Can anyone help?

Dave
 

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If you google the maker you will see a list of the products that C.B.Rodgers made . There are seeral pivtures but none that seem to bee similar to this one wonder if it migh be used to transfor power to another woodworking machine ? It does ppear that all of the machines were for woodworking. Industerial of course.
 

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I found the following in a quick net search.

81. A PICTORIAL OF AMERICAN MOLDING MACHINES from 1847-1940. Volume I from 1847-1895. 218 pages-$30. You will see incredible designs with commentary from original journals and trade catalogs for producing wooden moldings for furniture and houses. VOULME II: (1895-1940) 220 pages-$30. (both volumes for $55.) postpaid. Many sample cutter designs and large and small machines shown from such companies as Fay Egan, Rowley & Harmance, Hoyt Brothers, C. B. Rogers, H. B. Smith, Yates American, etc.

C. B. ROGERS & Co., machinists; capital stock, $200,000. Lyman GOULD, president; D. H. ROGERS, secretary; R. M. LADD, treasurer.

It looks like their line of wood-working machinery was was well know in their era. If the photo gave us a close-up of the top of the machine it would be a huge help in determining what it's purpose was.

In any event, hopefully someone will be along with more info. I do enjoy seeing some of the early equipment.
 

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Looks like it could be some kind of doweling machine, perhaps 3 different sizes, the wheel looks like its meant to turn the stock and if there is a cutter near the belt drive, that would sharpen the end of the dowel to then be used in a timber framed building?

Just a guess, but I think I saw something like this on This Old House, Norm toured a place that made the pins for a timber frame they were working on.
 

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You can do a patent search by date on the US patent website. I checked and for the date there were something like 504 patents issued that day, so if you had time, you could check into it. They have drawings posted for most of the patents.

If you can find the patent number that would speed things along for you.

Keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks to all who have responded. I'm going to take some of the suggestions back to my contact and see what he might want any of us to do at this point. I'll try to keep you all updated. Thanks again for all the help and suggestions.
 
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