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I cut a lot of wood on my TS that is shorter than 36" and always had it falling off the back and missing the roller outfeed. So i just made an outfeed table that mounts to the rear of the table. No biggie.

When measuring for the slots in the outfeed, I came up with them being 9 7/8" on centers. It doesn't come out to an even measure in metric either. It is an older cast top emerson/craftsman.

What in the world is the logic for this? Why not 10" on centers? Are other TS the same or is each brand different?

(And how come I buy a 1/4" tapping wood insert and need a metric allen wrench to install it?)

Steve.
 

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the whole imperial system doesn't make sense from the get-go. so the 9 7/8" just fits within the same logic. makes sense to me ;)

I'd work in metric which actually makes sense if only all the tool makers in the states would not sell imperial marked tools, the conversions are annoying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
PurpLev - In the early 60s I was in grade school when the US was converting to metric. Another one of those episodes that never got finished.

I used to review volume production tools and never saw one in past 10 years that didn't have inspection gage not in metric. Drawing or CAD may have been imperial, but inspection was in metric.

And what about being able to buy metric fasteners in imperial lengths?

Steve.
 

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lol, so true. the conversion process in the US just got stuck somewhere in the middle - I guess someone was calculating something in metric with imperial tools, and we're still waiting for the results.

kinda like the NASA incident in around the year 2000 with the Mars vehicle that crashed because they mixed imperial and metric calculation results…

oh well. gotta do what we can with what we've got.
 

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The US has been converting to metric since the 1800's. I have a book published in the US in the late 1800's where everything is in metric.

Anyways, the center to center distance doesn't make any sense because thats not the point of reference. Measure the distance from the edge of the slot to the flange. I think it makes more sense.

This would have been done in the 30's as well since everyone basically copied the unisaw.
 

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Let me see if I can put this a different way.

Its 7/8 because the thickness of the blade and the fact that they aren't spaced from center to center.

Each slot is distanced from the slot to the blade. Since a standard blade (pre thin kerf) is 1/8" thick you end up with a "off" distance when measuring center to center.

Edit:
Fun fact - 1 miter slot is 1 1/4" further away from the blade edge. Which is the same distance that the old dado sets covered.
 
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