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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Still abroad Nanjing China

I travel for my real job and have been away from home now for a while. I love this site since I can keep my mind on my shop when I am away. I miss the sound of my saw.

I started this trip in Hong Kong after a 16 hour flight directly over the North pole from a connecting flight in Newark. I had a meeting there and wandered the city a bit. I love this city. It is a real paradise for the traveler. Great people, great food, great things to see. Best Chinese food you could imagine.. but they don't call it Chinese food in China… they just call it food.

Anyhow from there I had a meeting in a city in China called Nanjing to close a major sale. Nanjing used to be called Nanking by us many years ago but like Peking is now Beijing. Anyhow it is an old city where you can see some of old china still. It was an interesting place. The problem was leaving. I had an 8:00am flight back to Hong Kong to connect with a flight to Mumbai (formerly called Bombay) India. Well, my taxi which should have taken 50 minutes to go to the airport arrived at my hotel and told me that it would cost double for the ride. Since my Chinese is almost non-existent, I was lucky that one woman at the hotel could translate for me.

I asked why to discover that it has snowed the night before. This city gets snow sometimes, but never this much. Also, they have no snow plows. So he wanted double the taxi fare because of the risk involved. I offered to show him how to drive safely in the snow. I told him that I would drive if he would tell me where to turn. He did not go for that idea. So anyhow it took us almost one and a half hours arriving only 25 minutes before my flight. I was sure that if the planes were going to take off, I was too late to get on. On the way there I saw no less than 12 cars spin out like a fat guy at the ice rink.

Anyhow, I arrived at the check in counter after passing initial security at the airport to find that the flights would all be delayed. Surprise surprise. So they told me to just stick around and see what happens but most likely I would not fly. I had to wait since I did have a connection to make and really, what else did I have to do? At least I was at the airport and there was no other place to be.

So the wait began. An amazing part of travel like this is how quickly you can make new friends. In line I struck up a conversation with 2 men. Each were the agriculture ministers from their countries Malaysia and Brunei. We had breakfast together and I learned about these two places. After breakfast I saw another guy that looked American and we struck up a chat. He was installing machinery in a factory in China and before long a nice woman from Norway joined us. She was there buying camping tents for a company she worked for back in her country. Next came an IT guy from Australia who works for Ford Motors in Singapore. Wow this world is amazing.

Well, as hours passed, the snow continues to fall and more accumulated on the wings of the planes outside as we became content that this would be our new home for as long as it takes. The airline treated us to both breakfast and lunch as hours continued to pass. The amazing thing was that nobody was getting upset. The usual jerk in the airport who takes out his anger on the airline employees who somehow were responsible for the snow must have stayed home. We were all kind of in this together.

Finally after 10 hours of hanging out, we heard a loud noise like a jet taking off.. It was weird since nobody had boarded. We went to the window to see in one direction 12 guys with shovels clearing the taxi way and int he other a large pair of trucks with jet engines on the back that were being used to blow off the runways. It was amazing to see how strong the thrust of the engines could blow the snow. An hour later we barded the planes but the planes were completely covered with snow. While still on the ground we had drinks and dinner and finally a crew arrived to de-ice the plane. After twelve and a half hours of waiting we were off to Hong Kong. Of course I missed my flight to India and made it the next day. I will tell you about my adventures in India next. When I arrived in India, I read on the CNN web site that the snow had gotten worse in China and many were now dead and homeless as the snow crushed homes and buildings that could not hold the weight on the roof and cars and buses slid into each other and off of cliffs. This is the worst snow in China's history.
 

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Still abroad Nanjing China

I travel for my real job and have been away from home now for a while. I love this site since I can keep my mind on my shop when I am away. I miss the sound of my saw.

I started this trip in Hong Kong after a 16 hour flight directly over the North pole from a connecting flight in Newark. I had a meeting there and wandered the city a bit. I love this city. It is a real paradise for the traveler. Great people, great food, great things to see. Best Chinese food you could imagine.. but they don't call it Chinese food in China… they just call it food.

Anyhow from there I had a meeting in a city in China called Nanjing to close a major sale. Nanjing used to be called Nanking by us many years ago but like Peking is now Beijing. Anyhow it is an old city where you can see some of old china still. It was an interesting place. The problem was leaving. I had an 8:00am flight back to Hong Kong to connect with a flight to Mumbai (formerly called Bombay) India. Well, my taxi which should have taken 50 minutes to go to the airport arrived at my hotel and told me that it would cost double for the ride. Since my Chinese is almost non-existent, I was lucky that one woman at the hotel could translate for me.

I asked why to discover that it has snowed the night before. This city gets snow sometimes, but never this much. Also, they have no snow plows. So he wanted double the taxi fare because of the risk involved. I offered to show him how to drive safely in the snow. I told him that I would drive if he would tell me where to turn. He did not go for that idea. So anyhow it took us almost one and a half hours arriving only 25 minutes before my flight. I was sure that if the planes were going to take off, I was too late to get on. On the way there I saw no less than 12 cars spin out like a fat guy at the ice rink.

Anyhow, I arrived at the check in counter after passing initial security at the airport to find that the flights would all be delayed. Surprise surprise. So they told me to just stick around and see what happens but most likely I would not fly. I had to wait since I did have a connection to make and really, what else did I have to do? At least I was at the airport and there was no other place to be.

So the wait began. An amazing part of travel like this is how quickly you can make new friends. In line I struck up a conversation with 2 men. Each were the agriculture ministers from their countries Malaysia and Brunei. We had breakfast together and I learned about these two places. After breakfast I saw another guy that looked American and we struck up a chat. He was installing machinery in a factory in China and before long a nice woman from Norway joined us. She was there buying camping tents for a company she worked for back in her country. Next came an IT guy from Australia who works for Ford Motors in Singapore. Wow this world is amazing.

Well, as hours passed, the snow continues to fall and more accumulated on the wings of the planes outside as we became content that this would be our new home for as long as it takes. The airline treated us to both breakfast and lunch as hours continued to pass. The amazing thing was that nobody was getting upset. The usual jerk in the airport who takes out his anger on the airline employees who somehow were responsible for the snow must have stayed home. We were all kind of in this together.

Finally after 10 hours of hanging out, we heard a loud noise like a jet taking off.. It was weird since nobody had boarded. We went to the window to see in one direction 12 guys with shovels clearing the taxi way and int he other a large pair of trucks with jet engines on the back that were being used to blow off the runways. It was amazing to see how strong the thrust of the engines could blow the snow. An hour later we barded the planes but the planes were completely covered with snow. While still on the ground we had drinks and dinner and finally a crew arrived to de-ice the plane. After twelve and a half hours of waiting we were off to Hong Kong. Of course I missed my flight to India and made it the next day. I will tell you about my adventures in India next. When I arrived in India, I read on the CNN web site that the snow had gotten worse in China and many were now dead and homeless as the snow crushed homes and buildings that could not hold the weight on the roof and cars and buses slid into each other and off of cliffs. This is the worst snow in China's history.
Cool story. thank you for posting, It is very interesting to hear what people do for a living. I look forward to hearing of your continued travelas. Do you try to find local woodworkers in areas that you visit or are you limited by time constraints?
 

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Still abroad Nanjing China

I travel for my real job and have been away from home now for a while. I love this site since I can keep my mind on my shop when I am away. I miss the sound of my saw.

I started this trip in Hong Kong after a 16 hour flight directly over the North pole from a connecting flight in Newark. I had a meeting there and wandered the city a bit. I love this city. It is a real paradise for the traveler. Great people, great food, great things to see. Best Chinese food you could imagine.. but they don't call it Chinese food in China… they just call it food.

Anyhow from there I had a meeting in a city in China called Nanjing to close a major sale. Nanjing used to be called Nanking by us many years ago but like Peking is now Beijing. Anyhow it is an old city where you can see some of old china still. It was an interesting place. The problem was leaving. I had an 8:00am flight back to Hong Kong to connect with a flight to Mumbai (formerly called Bombay) India. Well, my taxi which should have taken 50 minutes to go to the airport arrived at my hotel and told me that it would cost double for the ride. Since my Chinese is almost non-existent, I was lucky that one woman at the hotel could translate for me.

I asked why to discover that it has snowed the night before. This city gets snow sometimes, but never this much. Also, they have no snow plows. So he wanted double the taxi fare because of the risk involved. I offered to show him how to drive safely in the snow. I told him that I would drive if he would tell me where to turn. He did not go for that idea. So anyhow it took us almost one and a half hours arriving only 25 minutes before my flight. I was sure that if the planes were going to take off, I was too late to get on. On the way there I saw no less than 12 cars spin out like a fat guy at the ice rink.

Anyhow, I arrived at the check in counter after passing initial security at the airport to find that the flights would all be delayed. Surprise surprise. So they told me to just stick around and see what happens but most likely I would not fly. I had to wait since I did have a connection to make and really, what else did I have to do? At least I was at the airport and there was no other place to be.

So the wait began. An amazing part of travel like this is how quickly you can make new friends. In line I struck up a conversation with 2 men. Each were the agriculture ministers from their countries Malaysia and Brunei. We had breakfast together and I learned about these two places. After breakfast I saw another guy that looked American and we struck up a chat. He was installing machinery in a factory in China and before long a nice woman from Norway joined us. She was there buying camping tents for a company she worked for back in her country. Next came an IT guy from Australia who works for Ford Motors in Singapore. Wow this world is amazing.

Well, as hours passed, the snow continues to fall and more accumulated on the wings of the planes outside as we became content that this would be our new home for as long as it takes. The airline treated us to both breakfast and lunch as hours continued to pass. The amazing thing was that nobody was getting upset. The usual jerk in the airport who takes out his anger on the airline employees who somehow were responsible for the snow must have stayed home. We were all kind of in this together.

Finally after 10 hours of hanging out, we heard a loud noise like a jet taking off.. It was weird since nobody had boarded. We went to the window to see in one direction 12 guys with shovels clearing the taxi way and int he other a large pair of trucks with jet engines on the back that were being used to blow off the runways. It was amazing to see how strong the thrust of the engines could blow the snow. An hour later we barded the planes but the planes were completely covered with snow. While still on the ground we had drinks and dinner and finally a crew arrived to de-ice the plane. After twelve and a half hours of waiting we were off to Hong Kong. Of course I missed my flight to India and made it the next day. I will tell you about my adventures in India next. When I arrived in India, I read on the CNN web site that the snow had gotten worse in China and many were now dead and homeless as the snow crushed homes and buildings that could not hold the weight on the roof and cars and buses slid into each other and off of cliffs. This is the worst snow in China's history.
great story!!! fascinating. Kinda makes me want to go hang out in an airport for a day… "almost".
 

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Still abroad Nanjing China

I travel for my real job and have been away from home now for a while. I love this site since I can keep my mind on my shop when I am away. I miss the sound of my saw.

I started this trip in Hong Kong after a 16 hour flight directly over the North pole from a connecting flight in Newark. I had a meeting there and wandered the city a bit. I love this city. It is a real paradise for the traveler. Great people, great food, great things to see. Best Chinese food you could imagine.. but they don't call it Chinese food in China… they just call it food.

Anyhow from there I had a meeting in a city in China called Nanjing to close a major sale. Nanjing used to be called Nanking by us many years ago but like Peking is now Beijing. Anyhow it is an old city where you can see some of old china still. It was an interesting place. The problem was leaving. I had an 8:00am flight back to Hong Kong to connect with a flight to Mumbai (formerly called Bombay) India. Well, my taxi which should have taken 50 minutes to go to the airport arrived at my hotel and told me that it would cost double for the ride. Since my Chinese is almost non-existent, I was lucky that one woman at the hotel could translate for me.

I asked why to discover that it has snowed the night before. This city gets snow sometimes, but never this much. Also, they have no snow plows. So he wanted double the taxi fare because of the risk involved. I offered to show him how to drive safely in the snow. I told him that I would drive if he would tell me where to turn. He did not go for that idea. So anyhow it took us almost one and a half hours arriving only 25 minutes before my flight. I was sure that if the planes were going to take off, I was too late to get on. On the way there I saw no less than 12 cars spin out like a fat guy at the ice rink.

Anyhow, I arrived at the check in counter after passing initial security at the airport to find that the flights would all be delayed. Surprise surprise. So they told me to just stick around and see what happens but most likely I would not fly. I had to wait since I did have a connection to make and really, what else did I have to do? At least I was at the airport and there was no other place to be.

So the wait began. An amazing part of travel like this is how quickly you can make new friends. In line I struck up a conversation with 2 men. Each were the agriculture ministers from their countries Malaysia and Brunei. We had breakfast together and I learned about these two places. After breakfast I saw another guy that looked American and we struck up a chat. He was installing machinery in a factory in China and before long a nice woman from Norway joined us. She was there buying camping tents for a company she worked for back in her country. Next came an IT guy from Australia who works for Ford Motors in Singapore. Wow this world is amazing.

Well, as hours passed, the snow continues to fall and more accumulated on the wings of the planes outside as we became content that this would be our new home for as long as it takes. The airline treated us to both breakfast and lunch as hours continued to pass. The amazing thing was that nobody was getting upset. The usual jerk in the airport who takes out his anger on the airline employees who somehow were responsible for the snow must have stayed home. We were all kind of in this together.

Finally after 10 hours of hanging out, we heard a loud noise like a jet taking off.. It was weird since nobody had boarded. We went to the window to see in one direction 12 guys with shovels clearing the taxi way and int he other a large pair of trucks with jet engines on the back that were being used to blow off the runways. It was amazing to see how strong the thrust of the engines could blow the snow. An hour later we barded the planes but the planes were completely covered with snow. While still on the ground we had drinks and dinner and finally a crew arrived to de-ice the plane. After twelve and a half hours of waiting we were off to Hong Kong. Of course I missed my flight to India and made it the next day. I will tell you about my adventures in India next. When I arrived in India, I read on the CNN web site that the snow had gotten worse in China and many were now dead and homeless as the snow crushed homes and buildings that could not hold the weight on the roof and cars and buses slid into each other and off of cliffs. This is the worst snow in China's history.
as my name implies, hanging out at the airport wouldn't bother me in the least. Of course, I would have prefered to actually be out on the air side, but either way is better than sitting in the office.
Great story!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
I am sure that you will be glad to return home. For those of us who have never had the opportunity or taken the initiative to travel abroad your posts have been enlightening.

Thanks for letting me share your travels.
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
Interesting trip. Thanks for sharing
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
how fascinating
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
Another cool story, keep them comming.
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
Thanks for sharing your trip with us. I love hearing about people's travels to various places, mostly because I've never gotten a chance to go there…so far ;)
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
Hey - tell me if they have as many Royal Enfields (a little 500cc motorcycle they built in the fifties) there as I see in my dreams - love those bikes, keep the updates comin'.
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
What u say is true but u have projected only the dark side of the picture. Many countries have passed through these stages once. Pl dont underestimate this country which is a very ancient civilisation. Next few decades the picture will change. The country is passing through a transition period.
Patanjali
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
Sharad, I don't think that I showed the dark side at all. What stands out when you travel are the differences and unique experiences of your journey. If I were to write about only those things that are similar, there would not be an interesting story at all.

The greatest thing about India is the warmth and friendliness of the people. I also truly enjoy the exotic foods. To have not mentioned the other aspects would have been to conceal truths about this place. I lived for 10 years in Brazil which also has its challenges, and that is what makes that time even that much more interesting.

I certainly didnt mean to offend you in any way. If I did, I apologize.

As for the motorcycle, I will ask a friend today and find out for you. I will write more soon as my trip comes to a close today and I arrive back home on Friday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
As for the question of do I see woodworkers, I always seek out local artisans and I occasionally buy some cool stuff. I have some neat carvings from many places.

The biggest lesson I learn is when I see the basic tools they have and how great the work can be, It proves that it not the tool that makes the woodworker.
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
I did not feel offended. I am happy if u have seen the bright side also as u have mentioned about the warmth and friendliness of people. India is such a vast country that u cannot form any opinion in such a short trip. Each state has its own contribution to art and culture. As u have said it is not the tool that makes a woodworker. Traditional basic tools are used by artisans to make variety of woodcraft. I hope your next trip will be less troublesome. Next time do visit me at Pune. I am thoroughly enjoying and learning a lot as a member of Lumberjocks. By the way there are plenty of Royal Enfields on the roads in India.
Patanjali
 

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Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
motthunter…assuming your travels will continue through out the world, may I make a humble suggestion of a book: Kiss, Bow, or Shake Hands. I taught cross cultural relationships for several yrs in my past life and found that to be invaluable!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Now in India

After all the madness in China, now I have arrived in the place that is famous for its differences to us. I mean no disrespect to India in my descriptions, but if you have never been here, it is impossible to truly understand how it really is.

My only short way of explaining India is "COMPLETE SENSORY OVERLOAD". The air is thick with pollution and in many places indescribable smells of food, people, and who knows what else. There is never a moment that a horn is not honking, and the traffic is like none you have ever seen. It is almost anarchy. There seems to be no rules at all. Just cars, bicycles, motorcycles, tuc tucs everywhere. (a tuc tuc is a three wheeled taxi made from motorcycle parts) Everyone is going in opposite directions and I wonder where it is that they are going. It is aggressive and my recommendation is to trust the cab driver and look straight ahead. After all the driver does this every day and has lived this long without incident.

Anyhow, I arrived in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) and took a cab to the southernmost part of the city where I stayed at my friend's house. It was like an oasis from the madness in the street, and I had a good night's sleep since the next day I had to fly again to another city.

The next morning we left together for the domestic airport and had a nice flight north 300 kilometers to a city called Vadodara (formerly known as Boroda). We visited a factory there and even though this city is much smaller than Mumbai, it is still like a hornets nest of movement. Imagine having to stop every few miles so that the cows can get out of your way on the roads or because a street market started in the middle of the street that you want to rive down. Every glance you have is a new image that you may have never imagined existed before. I also visited a Hindu temple with my friend to see how they pray. I admit that i know little about their faith, but it is fascinating to watch. I will have to read a little to understand better. There is a lot of bell ringing, chanting, and flower placing.

After a good nights sleep I had a driver drive me for 5 hours to a city called Rajkot where I have meetings today and a return drive. The long drives on the highway are amazingly eventful. The roads are OK in most places, but the mix of vehicles, cows, and even the occasional camel make it so surreal. Many scenes of these old trucks make me think of scenes from the post holocausts images of movies like Mad Max. Imagine an overloaded truck with passengers seated on the roof as it hurdles down the highway or a small farm tractor on the highway pulling a trailer with 30 people sitting inside to go who knows where. India is not a place for the faint of heart, but if you can get past the inconveniences, it is a rich place to see with wonderful people. You also need a box of Imodium if your stomach is not used to exotic cuisine.

I am on my way to a meeting then it is off to the highway again. I am glad to be arriving home on Friday.
I am home… I will post my amazing mess of a journey home when I get some rest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Artisan Stores in Mumbai, India (formerly known as Bombay)

I had several hours to kill today before getting my flight home. Almost 16 hours on a direct flight is never fun, but at least I get to wander some before I go.

Unfortunately the stores would not allow me to take pictures of the intricate carvings and amazing pieces. I will try to get a friend to get some for later to show. The craftsmanship of the Indian carvers rivals any in the world. Most of the pieces I saw were of figures from their Hindu faith. I like to believe that their devotion to their faith adds to their creativity and helps them make even finer work.

I go into a store like this and want to take everything home with me. It is hard to fit a 6 foot tall statue of something in my suitcase so maybe next time I will get one and ship it home.

Many think that India is too far from their reality and budget to visit on a vacation, but in the end many exotic locations like this are well within reach to most travelers. I think that including the ticket, a person can take a vacation here for close to the same amount as some tacky resort beach vacation. The difference is that in a place like India, you can work on your mind rather than just the perfect tan. After all, tans fade and knowledge grows.

I will write more after returning to the states.
 

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Artisan Stores in Mumbai, India (formerly known as Bombay)

I had several hours to kill today before getting my flight home. Almost 16 hours on a direct flight is never fun, but at least I get to wander some before I go.

Unfortunately the stores would not allow me to take pictures of the intricate carvings and amazing pieces. I will try to get a friend to get some for later to show. The craftsmanship of the Indian carvers rivals any in the world. Most of the pieces I saw were of figures from their Hindu faith. I like to believe that their devotion to their faith adds to their creativity and helps them make even finer work.

I go into a store like this and want to take everything home with me. It is hard to fit a 6 foot tall statue of something in my suitcase so maybe next time I will get one and ship it home.

Many think that India is too far from their reality and budget to visit on a vacation, but in the end many exotic locations like this are well within reach to most travelers. I think that including the ticket, a person can take a vacation here for close to the same amount as some tacky resort beach vacation. The difference is that in a place like India, you can work on your mind rather than just the perfect tan. After all, tans fade and knowledge grows.

I will write more after returning to the states.
Nice post. I agree that many places like India are far more accessible than people realize. Next time, swing by and see me in Malaysia!
 

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Artisan Stores in Mumbai, India (formerly known as Bombay)

I had several hours to kill today before getting my flight home. Almost 16 hours on a direct flight is never fun, but at least I get to wander some before I go.

Unfortunately the stores would not allow me to take pictures of the intricate carvings and amazing pieces. I will try to get a friend to get some for later to show. The craftsmanship of the Indian carvers rivals any in the world. Most of the pieces I saw were of figures from their Hindu faith. I like to believe that their devotion to their faith adds to their creativity and helps them make even finer work.

I go into a store like this and want to take everything home with me. It is hard to fit a 6 foot tall statue of something in my suitcase so maybe next time I will get one and ship it home.

Many think that India is too far from their reality and budget to visit on a vacation, but in the end many exotic locations like this are well within reach to most travelers. I think that including the ticket, a person can take a vacation here for close to the same amount as some tacky resort beach vacation. The difference is that in a place like India, you can work on your mind rather than just the perfect tan. After all, tans fade and knowledge grows.

I will write more after returning to the states.
Too bad you were not able to get any pics. I would love to see them. It is so interesting to see how craftsamn from around the world work with wood.

Thanks for the post and keep them comming.
 
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