LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
1 - 20 of 53 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,481 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
Amazing shop! I got a chance to take a class at the Woodwright's Shop with Bill and Roy. Great guys and great teachers.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
Damn, that's a nice shop. Love all the moulding planes, and tools. The shop atmosphere seems very nice and old time.

Very cool.

Thanks.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,826 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
This is a very interesting post. Thanks.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,833 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
Well that was enjoyable, thx for posting… Man that is alot of planes!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,547 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
Josh, seems like a wonderful place to be. I didn't see a cot for an apprentice, though.

Totally unrelated - I have access to tons of old ceder fencing that I'll be using for shop tills and I really like your paint job on your saw till. Do you have any info on the process you used in painting it?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
Thanks everyone! Bill is a genuinely great friend, and certainly has an amazing shop. I lust over his tool collection…especially the molding planes. On Sunday I'll be posting another workshop: legendary guitar luthier Wayne Henderson, so subscribe to my blog.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
ToddJB: regarding my saw till, I used blue milk paint as the base. Then added a layer of boiled linseed oil on top. After several days you can also finish it off with thinned shellac (I didn't do this on my saw till though).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,547 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
Awesome. Thanks.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
A Big thanks to Bill for allowing all to visit his shop. If Bill never bought or cut a piece of wood to dry; I'm confident, he'll be making planes until he dies!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
What a beautiful workshop. I can only imagine the joy of being that surrounds that place.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Bill Anderson - Chapel Hill, North Carolina


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I share my recent visit to the amazing workshop of Bill Anderson, owner of Edwards Mountain Woodworks in Chatham county, North Carolina (near Chapel Hill). View the original full blog entry here.



Bill teaches joinery and plane making at Roy Underhill's Woodwright's School in nearby Pittsboro, NC. He also teaches at other well-known locations, including the John C. Campbell Folk School.



Bill makes marvelous historical furniture and owns more molding planes than I've ever seen in one location.



Molding planes have become my passion, so a visit to his shop was better than a trip to Disneyland.



Bill told me that he picked up many of his tools when he worked in England years ago. He reminisced about the perplexed faces of customs officers when they inspected his suitcases.



Bill does, however, have a good excuse for having so many tools. Wait a minute, does he really need an excuse? Anyway, he justifies having so many tools because of all the classes he teaches. It really helps for each student to have access to quality woodworking hand tools.



I asked Bill if he has used all of his planes. Without a moment's hesitation he replied, "of course not." I instantly felt better about all the old tools that I've purchased, but haven't yet used.



Bill and I spent several days filming video for our upcoming DVD about how to make a 18th century wooden jointer plane. We loaded my truck up with so many gorgeous hand tools for the molding plane class that he invited me to stay for the next day. I felt a great temptation to just keep on driving back to Virginia…but fortunately for Bill, I resisted that urge.



You can view a small sample of Bill's amazing furniture here. If you're interested in reaching Bill for custom historical furniture, you can call or email him here.

Want to be notified when our 18th Century Jointer Plane DVD is released for sale? Click here to be added to our list.
Wow. Thanks Bill.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wayne Henderson Guitars - Rugby, Virginia


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I show a visit that I made to the workshop of legendary guitar luthier and bluegrass musician, Wayne Henderson. Wayne's shop and home sit along a quiet country rode in the rural village of Rugby, Virginia. Read my original article here.



Wayne Henderson's performance resume stretches from The White House to Carnegie Hall, and all the way to the Queen of England. He is perhaps even more well-known for his world-class custom-made guitars and mandolins.



Over 500 custom Henderson Guitars have graced the fingers of world-renowned musicians such as Eric Clapton, Doc Watson, Peter Rowan, Norman Blake, and Brad Paisley.



If you're thinking of purchasing a custom Henderson guitar, then you'd better get in line behind some pretty famous (and wealthy) musicians and collectors. Wayne's cozy and fairly-tidy shop is filled with guitar parts, familiar & unfamiliar hand tools & power tools, and exotic woods from all over the world. The floor is covered with curly wood shavings - produced by endless hours of hand whittling, planing, and scraping.



Over the years, the Henderson Guitar shop has become an unofficial pilgrimage stop along the world-famous bluegrass route, known as The Crooked Road. If you come on the right day, it's likely that you'll run into someone famous. Before his death, Doc Watson (Wayne's close friend) was a regular visitor to the wood shop. Wayne Henderson's personal apprentice has been his daughter, Elizabeth "Jane" Henderson. My wife Laura grew up with Elizabeth, and that is how we were introduced to Wayne.



Wayne and Elizabeth have worked together on many guitars, and now Wayne's reputation for skill and craftsmanship has passed to Elizabeth. If you'd like to Contact Elizabeth Henderson for a custom-made Henderson guitar or ukulele , then contact her through her blog "The Luthier's Apprentice.



Wayne took time out of his busy schedule to show us around his workshop, share some of his special experiences, and pick some amazing songs on his favorite guitars and a nearly-finished mandolin.



Over a barbecue lunch in his house, Wayne pulled out an old "guitar" that he made when he was 7 or 8 years old. The body was made from a tobacco box, and the string came from fishing line. He also spoke of his passion for the Boston Red Sox, showed us some of his guns, and strummed some of his favorite guitars that he has made (and kept) over the years. His eyes really lit up when he pulled out "number 400″, a beautiful acoustic guitar, with custom inlays and a sound as warm as the sun. Watch the video to hear a couple songs on this guitar.



We had a great and memorable day with Wayne and Elizabeth Henderson, and hope to return to their workshop soon! You can learn more about Wayne Henderson Guitars and Wayne's bluegrass music festival on his website.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
Wayne Henderson Guitars - Rugby, Virginia


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I show a visit that I made to the workshop of legendary guitar luthier and bluegrass musician, Wayne Henderson. Wayne's shop and home sit along a quiet country rode in the rural village of Rugby, Virginia. Read my original article here.



Wayne Henderson's performance resume stretches from The White House to Carnegie Hall, and all the way to the Queen of England. He is perhaps even more well-known for his world-class custom-made guitars and mandolins.



Over 500 custom Henderson Guitars have graced the fingers of world-renowned musicians such as Eric Clapton, Doc Watson, Peter Rowan, Norman Blake, and Brad Paisley.



If you're thinking of purchasing a custom Henderson guitar, then you'd better get in line behind some pretty famous (and wealthy) musicians and collectors. Wayne's cozy and fairly-tidy shop is filled with guitar parts, familiar & unfamiliar hand tools & power tools, and exotic woods from all over the world. The floor is covered with curly wood shavings - produced by endless hours of hand whittling, planing, and scraping.



Over the years, the Henderson Guitar shop has become an unofficial pilgrimage stop along the world-famous bluegrass route, known as The Crooked Road. If you come on the right day, it's likely that you'll run into someone famous. Before his death, Doc Watson (Wayne's close friend) was a regular visitor to the wood shop. Wayne Henderson's personal apprentice has been his daughter, Elizabeth "Jane" Henderson. My wife Laura grew up with Elizabeth, and that is how we were introduced to Wayne.



Wayne and Elizabeth have worked together on many guitars, and now Wayne's reputation for skill and craftsmanship has passed to Elizabeth. If you'd like to Contact Elizabeth Henderson for a custom-made Henderson guitar or ukulele , then contact her through her blog "The Luthier's Apprentice.



Wayne took time out of his busy schedule to show us around his workshop, share some of his special experiences, and pick some amazing songs on his favorite guitars and a nearly-finished mandolin.



Over a barbecue lunch in his house, Wayne pulled out an old "guitar" that he made when he was 7 or 8 years old. The body was made from a tobacco box, and the string came from fishing line. He also spoke of his passion for the Boston Red Sox, showed us some of his guns, and strummed some of his favorite guitars that he has made (and kept) over the years. His eyes really lit up when he pulled out "number 400″, a beautiful acoustic guitar, with custom inlays and a sound as warm as the sun. Watch the video to hear a couple songs on this guitar.



We had a great and memorable day with Wayne and Elizabeth Henderson, and hope to return to their workshop soon! You can learn more about Wayne Henderson Guitars and Wayne's bluegrass music festival on his website.
thanks for sharing this man…was really cool to watch and read.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Wayne Henderson Guitars - Rugby, Virginia


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I show a visit that I made to the workshop of legendary guitar luthier and bluegrass musician, Wayne Henderson. Wayne's shop and home sit along a quiet country rode in the rural village of Rugby, Virginia. Read my original article here.



Wayne Henderson's performance resume stretches from The White House to Carnegie Hall, and all the way to the Queen of England. He is perhaps even more well-known for his world-class custom-made guitars and mandolins.



Over 500 custom Henderson Guitars have graced the fingers of world-renowned musicians such as Eric Clapton, Doc Watson, Peter Rowan, Norman Blake, and Brad Paisley.



If you're thinking of purchasing a custom Henderson guitar, then you'd better get in line behind some pretty famous (and wealthy) musicians and collectors. Wayne's cozy and fairly-tidy shop is filled with guitar parts, familiar & unfamiliar hand tools & power tools, and exotic woods from all over the world. The floor is covered with curly wood shavings - produced by endless hours of hand whittling, planing, and scraping.



Over the years, the Henderson Guitar shop has become an unofficial pilgrimage stop along the world-famous bluegrass route, known as The Crooked Road. If you come on the right day, it's likely that you'll run into someone famous. Before his death, Doc Watson (Wayne's close friend) was a regular visitor to the wood shop. Wayne Henderson's personal apprentice has been his daughter, Elizabeth "Jane" Henderson. My wife Laura grew up with Elizabeth, and that is how we were introduced to Wayne.



Wayne and Elizabeth have worked together on many guitars, and now Wayne's reputation for skill and craftsmanship has passed to Elizabeth. If you'd like to Contact Elizabeth Henderson for a custom-made Henderson guitar or ukulele , then contact her through her blog "The Luthier's Apprentice.



Wayne took time out of his busy schedule to show us around his workshop, share some of his special experiences, and pick some amazing songs on his favorite guitars and a nearly-finished mandolin.



Over a barbecue lunch in his house, Wayne pulled out an old "guitar" that he made when he was 7 or 8 years old. The body was made from a tobacco box, and the string came from fishing line. He also spoke of his passion for the Boston Red Sox, showed us some of his guns, and strummed some of his favorite guitars that he has made (and kept) over the years. His eyes really lit up when he pulled out "number 400″, a beautiful acoustic guitar, with custom inlays and a sound as warm as the sun. Watch the video to hear a couple songs on this guitar.



We had a great and memorable day with Wayne and Elizabeth Henderson, and hope to return to their workshop soon! You can learn more about Wayne Henderson Guitars and Wayne's bluegrass music festival on his website.
That video was FANFREAKINTASTIC Joshua, thanks for posting!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
Wayne Henderson Guitars - Rugby, Virginia


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I show a visit that I made to the workshop of legendary guitar luthier and bluegrass musician, Wayne Henderson. Wayne's shop and home sit along a quiet country rode in the rural village of Rugby, Virginia. Read my original article here.



Wayne Henderson's performance resume stretches from The White House to Carnegie Hall, and all the way to the Queen of England. He is perhaps even more well-known for his world-class custom-made guitars and mandolins.



Over 500 custom Henderson Guitars have graced the fingers of world-renowned musicians such as Eric Clapton, Doc Watson, Peter Rowan, Norman Blake, and Brad Paisley.



If you're thinking of purchasing a custom Henderson guitar, then you'd better get in line behind some pretty famous (and wealthy) musicians and collectors. Wayne's cozy and fairly-tidy shop is filled with guitar parts, familiar & unfamiliar hand tools & power tools, and exotic woods from all over the world. The floor is covered with curly wood shavings - produced by endless hours of hand whittling, planing, and scraping.



Over the years, the Henderson Guitar shop has become an unofficial pilgrimage stop along the world-famous bluegrass route, known as The Crooked Road. If you come on the right day, it's likely that you'll run into someone famous. Before his death, Doc Watson (Wayne's close friend) was a regular visitor to the wood shop. Wayne Henderson's personal apprentice has been his daughter, Elizabeth "Jane" Henderson. My wife Laura grew up with Elizabeth, and that is how we were introduced to Wayne.



Wayne and Elizabeth have worked together on many guitars, and now Wayne's reputation for skill and craftsmanship has passed to Elizabeth. If you'd like to Contact Elizabeth Henderson for a custom-made Henderson guitar or ukulele , then contact her through her blog "The Luthier's Apprentice.



Wayne took time out of his busy schedule to show us around his workshop, share some of his special experiences, and pick some amazing songs on his favorite guitars and a nearly-finished mandolin.



Over a barbecue lunch in his house, Wayne pulled out an old "guitar" that he made when he was 7 or 8 years old. The body was made from a tobacco box, and the string came from fishing line. He also spoke of his passion for the Boston Red Sox, showed us some of his guns, and strummed some of his favorite guitars that he has made (and kept) over the years. His eyes really lit up when he pulled out "number 400″, a beautiful acoustic guitar, with custom inlays and a sound as warm as the sun. Watch the video to hear a couple songs on this guitar.



We had a great and memorable day with Wayne and Elizabeth Henderson, and hope to return to their workshop soon! You can learn more about Wayne Henderson Guitars and Wayne's bluegrass music festival on his website.
That just makes ya know how many really good luthiers (and pickers) are out there.
Thanks.
Bill
 

· Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Wayne Henderson Guitars - Rugby, Virginia


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I show a visit that I made to the workshop of legendary guitar luthier and bluegrass musician, Wayne Henderson. Wayne's shop and home sit along a quiet country rode in the rural village of Rugby, Virginia. Read my original article here.



Wayne Henderson's performance resume stretches from The White House to Carnegie Hall, and all the way to the Queen of England. He is perhaps even more well-known for his world-class custom-made guitars and mandolins.



Over 500 custom Henderson Guitars have graced the fingers of world-renowned musicians such as Eric Clapton, Doc Watson, Peter Rowan, Norman Blake, and Brad Paisley.



If you're thinking of purchasing a custom Henderson guitar, then you'd better get in line behind some pretty famous (and wealthy) musicians and collectors. Wayne's cozy and fairly-tidy shop is filled with guitar parts, familiar & unfamiliar hand tools & power tools, and exotic woods from all over the world. The floor is covered with curly wood shavings - produced by endless hours of hand whittling, planing, and scraping.



Over the years, the Henderson Guitar shop has become an unofficial pilgrimage stop along the world-famous bluegrass route, known as The Crooked Road. If you come on the right day, it's likely that you'll run into someone famous. Before his death, Doc Watson (Wayne's close friend) was a regular visitor to the wood shop. Wayne Henderson's personal apprentice has been his daughter, Elizabeth "Jane" Henderson. My wife Laura grew up with Elizabeth, and that is how we were introduced to Wayne.



Wayne and Elizabeth have worked together on many guitars, and now Wayne's reputation for skill and craftsmanship has passed to Elizabeth. If you'd like to Contact Elizabeth Henderson for a custom-made Henderson guitar or ukulele , then contact her through her blog "The Luthier's Apprentice.



Wayne took time out of his busy schedule to show us around his workshop, share some of his special experiences, and pick some amazing songs on his favorite guitars and a nearly-finished mandolin.



Over a barbecue lunch in his house, Wayne pulled out an old "guitar" that he made when he was 7 or 8 years old. The body was made from a tobacco box, and the string came from fishing line. He also spoke of his passion for the Boston Red Sox, showed us some of his guns, and strummed some of his favorite guitars that he has made (and kept) over the years. His eyes really lit up when he pulled out "number 400″, a beautiful acoustic guitar, with custom inlays and a sound as warm as the sun. Watch the video to hear a couple songs on this guitar.



We had a great and memorable day with Wayne and Elizabeth Henderson, and hope to return to their workshop soon! You can learn more about Wayne Henderson Guitars and Wayne's bluegrass music festival on his website.
You're welcome everyone. Wayne's a pretty cool guy.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,826 Posts
Wayne Henderson Guitars - Rugby, Virginia


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

In the above Video I show a visit that I made to the workshop of legendary guitar luthier and bluegrass musician, Wayne Henderson. Wayne's shop and home sit along a quiet country rode in the rural village of Rugby, Virginia. Read my original article here.



Wayne Henderson's performance resume stretches from The White House to Carnegie Hall, and all the way to the Queen of England. He is perhaps even more well-known for his world-class custom-made guitars and mandolins.



Over 500 custom Henderson Guitars have graced the fingers of world-renowned musicians such as Eric Clapton, Doc Watson, Peter Rowan, Norman Blake, and Brad Paisley.



If you're thinking of purchasing a custom Henderson guitar, then you'd better get in line behind some pretty famous (and wealthy) musicians and collectors. Wayne's cozy and fairly-tidy shop is filled with guitar parts, familiar & unfamiliar hand tools & power tools, and exotic woods from all over the world. The floor is covered with curly wood shavings - produced by endless hours of hand whittling, planing, and scraping.



Over the years, the Henderson Guitar shop has become an unofficial pilgrimage stop along the world-famous bluegrass route, known as The Crooked Road. If you come on the right day, it's likely that you'll run into someone famous. Before his death, Doc Watson (Wayne's close friend) was a regular visitor to the wood shop. Wayne Henderson's personal apprentice has been his daughter, Elizabeth "Jane" Henderson. My wife Laura grew up with Elizabeth, and that is how we were introduced to Wayne.



Wayne and Elizabeth have worked together on many guitars, and now Wayne's reputation for skill and craftsmanship has passed to Elizabeth. If you'd like to Contact Elizabeth Henderson for a custom-made Henderson guitar or ukulele , then contact her through her blog "The Luthier's Apprentice.



Wayne took time out of his busy schedule to show us around his workshop, share some of his special experiences, and pick some amazing songs on his favorite guitars and a nearly-finished mandolin.



Over a barbecue lunch in his house, Wayne pulled out an old "guitar" that he made when he was 7 or 8 years old. The body was made from a tobacco box, and the string came from fishing line. He also spoke of his passion for the Boston Red Sox, showed us some of his guns, and strummed some of his favorite guitars that he has made (and kept) over the years. His eyes really lit up when he pulled out "number 400″, a beautiful acoustic guitar, with custom inlays and a sound as warm as the sun. Watch the video to hear a couple songs on this guitar.



We had a great and memorable day with Wayne and Elizabeth Henderson, and hope to return to their workshop soon! You can learn more about Wayne Henderson Guitars and Wayne's bluegrass music festival on his website.
Thanks for the great tour and pickin', Wayne.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com
 

· Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Virginia's Frontier Culture Museum - 1740s Settlement


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

My family and I recently visited one of my new favorite woodworking destinations: The Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton, Virginia (see the above video). We planned to stay 2 hours, but stayed 6. I loved my visit and the historical tools and furniture so much that I went back a week later to interview the head furniture makers. So I'll be sharing several upcoming videos & photos from my two visits. Some of them will focus just on the furniture.



The Frontier Culture Museum is unlike anything I've encountered. The organization has disassembled actual period farms from England, Ireland, Germany, Africa, and different parts of the United States, then reconstructed them on several hundred acres of lush Virginia farmland. Why? To educate Americans on how our American farms were influenced by immigrants from overseas. You can see the different farms here.



What I found particularly fascinating was the woodworking tools and furniture displayed at each of the 10 farms. The staff actually use the respective tools to construct furniture and tools (like the below shaving horse). It is a hands on "museum" so I just helped myself to all the amazing tool chests! The staff didn't mind. They also didn't mind that I constantly caressed their reproduction furniture either…although I got some strange looks.



This fellow (below) grew up in the big city but longed for a job that would give him a taste of a simpler time. He glowed as he showed me some of his woodworking projects, especially his mostly-completed shaving horse:



I felt so refreshed by my time on these farms!

I'll be sharing a series of these workshops & tool chests, so make sure you subscribe to have my future articles delivered to your inbox.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,359 Posts
Virginia's Frontier Culture Museum - 1740s Settlement


By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com)

My family and I recently visited one of my new favorite woodworking destinations: The Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton, Virginia (see the above video). We planned to stay 2 hours, but stayed 6. I loved my visit and the historical tools and furniture so much that I went back a week later to interview the head furniture makers. So I'll be sharing several upcoming videos & photos from my two visits. Some of them will focus just on the furniture.



The Frontier Culture Museum is unlike anything I've encountered. The organization has disassembled actual period farms from England, Ireland, Germany, Africa, and different parts of the United States, then reconstructed them on several hundred acres of lush Virginia farmland. Why? To educate Americans on how our American farms were influenced by immigrants from overseas. You can see the different farms here.



What I found particularly fascinating was the woodworking tools and furniture displayed at each of the 10 farms. The staff actually use the respective tools to construct furniture and tools (like the below shaving horse). It is a hands on "museum" so I just helped myself to all the amazing tool chests! The staff didn't mind. They also didn't mind that I constantly caressed their reproduction furniture either…although I got some strange looks.



This fellow (below) grew up in the big city but longed for a job that would give him a taste of a simpler time. He glowed as he showed me some of his woodworking projects, especially his mostly-completed shaving horse:



I felt so refreshed by my time on these farms!

I'll be sharing a series of these workshops & tool chests, so make sure you subscribe to have my future articles delivered to your inbox.
More! More!
Wanna see more.
Get my point? :)
Bill
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top