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A buddy call me up and ask him to lay down some sort of wood flooring. I do not know if its solid wood or laminate flooring. What sort of tools would I need for this job? Would this blade be worth the $ http://www.diablotools.com/blades-10.html I have a table saw heavy contractors, circular saw and drill and miter saw and misc hand tools. Any thing else I would need? The job is 200 miles from the shop.
 

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If it is a lam floor a miter saw would be very beneficial. You would be doing more cross cuts then rips. I buddy of mine recently laid a lam floor in his basement and all he used was a cheap HF miter saw. He is not a "tool guy" by any stretch of the imagination.
 

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Andrew, I would start by finding out what type of flooring it is. You definately will need a miter saw as Mark said. And if it is 3/4" flooring, you will need a nailer, similar to this nailer. The link also contains a video demonstrating how to install a nail down floor. You can get these in a manual or pneumatic version. I would not consider getting a face nailer. You can use a finish nailer instead.

But the most important thing is to make sure the subfloor is dry, clean and level. Once this is done then you can proceed with the installation of the flooring. At some point you will also, more than likely, have to rip some flooring to width. This can be done with a circular saw, jig saw or table saw, depending on what you have available.
 

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I ditto all the previous posts. Also, since you'll be doing most of your cuts at a length that leaves space at the wall's edge, a miter saw isn't absolutely necessary but sure makes the job easier especially when using hard woods. Another saw that can follow a line reasonably would be fine. The blade is almost irrelevant as long as it can cut.

If doing hardwood floors with a nailer:
When I did my floors I decided that I'd probably use it only a few times in my life. So I ordered one from amazon at at least half the price of other stores. It has served me well in three houses. Look for a hydraulic one that has numerous people saying it has given them good service. There are lots to choose from.
You'll need an air compressor. A small one works fine and will always be handy. I have a $99 one from sears.

Putting down a hardwood floor isn't really that difficult. At $2-$3/square foot they charge for installation you can justify the cost of a few tools to get the job done. If the area is large the person asking you to help can probably justify the expenditure.

link at amazon of nailers they sell

You can rent a nailer too but floors go slowly. I'll bet you have it for a few days and it won't be much less money from what you could have bought one for. Then you have the ease of mind of taking your time and getting it right and who knows, you might end up doing a few other floors some day.

If you're doing a pergo laminate type of flooring flooring it's basically a cut and snap together process. Few tools needed.

Good luck with it and be sure to give us a heads up on the results!
 

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Scott Bryan, nailbanger, and Craftman on the lake gave you exactly all you need for a hard floor, here we have a place you can rent all those tools by the day or by the hour.

Now if it is a laminated floor it is all different and Markwithak gave all you need.
 

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I'm planning on installing wood floors in my home. I bought a book, but the above post is about the most valuable information I've ever seen; I'm pasting it into a word doc for saving. Thanks!
 

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andrew , i rented a flooring nailer , no air assist , to much work ,
so i bought this one ( it's on sale now )
makes flooring ( t and g oak ) a snap !
if it is laminate , use a maple block ( above snap machining )
to tighten joint ,
and be sure to clean all sawdust between joints ,
as it will keep them open !
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Flooring-Nailer/h7826
 
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