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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
I think it looks pretty good. I have gained a fair number of old planes and haven't had the time to work on them yet.

I was thinking of using this method for the planes that have little "value", but will be great to use in the shop.
I have a couple that may have some "value" to them and those will be treated a little softer.

Looks good. It is nice to see new life breathed into an old work horse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Kevin,

Thanks for the compliment on my new baby :)

As for this affecting the value, I'm not so sure it will overall. The whole piece was hand sanded and was pretty lightly done.

However, I wouldn't try this with a plane with significant rust. It would work, but it would take a while and eat up a lot of time and elbow grease. At that point, I'd go with either the citric acid or the electrolysis. If you use acid though, you'll probably want to come back and use sand paper to clean it up a bit. Acid leaves a darker gray tint to the metal that just doesn't look good. I'm not sure about electrolysis though ;)
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Trying electrolysis currently (get it?- current…okay, never mind). Just turns the rust into loose black iron, which allows you to scrub it off more easily. It's cheap after buying the washing soda (about 6 bucks) and the rebar pins (two at 74 cents) and copper wire (coupla bucks). You will have to replace the rebar pins over time. They corrode and rust up with use. Not so enthralled with this.

I'm going to try Evapo-rust next.
 

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In Loving Memory
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10,319 Posts
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Now that looks nice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Douglas,

Let me know how the Evapo-rust works for you please! I'm open for new ideas! Sure can't hurt.

And for the record, I thought that "currently" was a little funny…very little funny :D

Gary,

Thanks! She turned out better than I thought she would, truth be told.
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
I'm not a fan of the bright work looks of a new plane. I prefer the natural patina that comes with a tool that was used by a workman and bears the mark of his hands and toil. That patina is paramount on collector's tools and besides, I like it! I understand that this one was neglected and sometimes you can't do any good but to restore it the best way you know how. You've got yourself a good user that when tuned up will provide you with many years worth of thin curly shavings.

When you have to use sandpaper just try and use long continuous strokes in order to approximate the factory grind. On these old planes that warrant the extremity of using abrasives, I clean the metal of all oils and contaminants and apply some Plum Brown metal finish by Birchwood-Casey. You can pick it up in a gunshop or through a catalog such as Brownell's. Follow the directions and what you'll end up with is a nice looking dark and almost natural patina that will wear-in nicely over the ensuing years. A light coat of WD40 or any fine lubricant and you'll stave off any rust in the future. Sweet!

Also, in the future, and BEFORE you attack a vintage iron plane with sandpaper, sneak up on it first with 0000 steel wool instead. And if you want to replace or refurbish the japanning, I have a source for the real thing. Let me know, but with a caveat, you'll want to do the deed when the missus is out of town because she will raise holy heck with the smell you put in her oven and by extension the whole damn house. If she's away, then you'll have time to Easy-Off the oven and air the house out before she returns. But it sure is pretty.

always,
J.C.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Thanks J.C. I'll probably take you up on that with regards to the japanning. For the record though, a previous owner did the painting. I'm just making due with it. I did, however, remove the paint on the lever cap. Just looked horrible there.
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Tomcat, looks like a another great restoration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Thanks Chris. It'll be a little while probably until I can get to the next one. It should be a challenge ;)
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Nice…
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Looks like a good'un. Get'er clean, get'er flat and get 'er to work!
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Looks like the cat on the Friskies bag wants to get its hands on that plane and take it for a spin…

How does the sole look - will it need some lapping?
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Good looking restoration. Thanks for the step-by-step.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Thanks folks! As of right now, the sole is already flat, so no needs to do anything there. I just need to sharpen her and see what she can do!

Which will be promptly followed by me trying to find out how to tune her better :)
 

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The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
Ooof, I'm amazed at you guys that restore these things. My neighbor has a truckload of rust. Some planes that are from Stanley that are stamped Made in Canada. A bunch of #5's and #7's. He asked for help in restoring them. I just ran away screaming. He reads this site, so I hope he's come across the electrolysis method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The New Series Intro

Well, now, most of my work lately has been tool restoration and rehab. As such, it's not really woodworking, but not not woodworking either, since these are woodworking tools. Some of you have seen my Disston and my back saw. I'm pretty proud of both of those. But here's a tool you guys haven't had a chance to see yet.

This is a DE7. Sounds odd, but it's just a #7 jointer plane put out by Shapleigh's Hardware. I picked this up for $19.99 on ebay. I wanted a jointer plane pretty bad, and stumbled along on this one. I suspect that the only reason it was still there was because no one who saw it knew what DE7 was. I didn't either, but Google is my friend. So, without further ado, here's the plane!



It's not that bad really, from the pic. Unfortunately, there was streaks of white paint on the sole and rust was everywhere. To top things off, someone had painted over much of the plane at some point in the past. The only things spared the paint was the blade, chip breaker, tote, and knob. Even the brass adjustment was painted over, though most of it had chipped off by the time I got it.

I picked out the rest of the paint I could get to on the brass adjustment knob, then broke the plane down. The frog was in pretty good shape, just needing some surface rust knocked off. The inside of the bed wasn't to bad either. The interior of the bed had been painted black, making it difficult to tell how the japanning was, so I quit messing around and got to work.

Some people use citric acid to clean planes. Others use electrolysis. Both methods seem to work fine. However, I took a page from my saw rehabs and used mineral spirits and sand paper. I hit the blade and chip breaker, which were covered in rust. On the chip breaker, I found an etching that read "L. Bailey's Patent Dec. 24, 1867". On the blade was the words "Stanley Rule & Level Co." I had suspected this was built by Stanley based on the lateral adjuster's design, and this just reinforced that belief. After those were clean, I got to work on the sole and sides. The paint came off surprisingly easy, and the rust was mostly surface rust. However, it's obvious from the pitting that this wasn't always the case. Then I sanded the nasty black paint off the cap iron. It wasn't original from what I could tell, so it needed to go. The layer of rust under the paint indicated someone just painted it to keep it from rusting worse. Looks pretty darn good now!

She's not the prettiest girl at the ball, those are probably Veritas or Lie Nielsens, but she'll definitely turn a head or two!



So…what do you think?
mot,

Just have him send them to me. I'll give them a good home <evil>
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Norvell Shapleigh Panel Saw restoration

At the same time I got my Disston D-8, I picked up this little gem. The seller on eBay saw the word Shapleigh inside the diamond logo, and recognized it for what it was. What he didn't see was the Norvell before it. The seller felt that this was likely a Harvey Peace saw, and after some research, I have to agree. It looks an awful lot like a P-26. Unfortunately, this looks like it was made after the Disston buy-out, since the medallion simply says "Warranted Superior". Still, it's a cool saw. So, without further ado, here's the before pic:



As you can tell, this thing was in pretty rough shape, but not as bad as the Disston I posted about earlier. Well, it was and it wasn't. The Disston was more discolored, but this one had more deep rust. Still, I took the mineral spirits and 320 grit sand paper to this puppy and cleaned it right up.

Here is your after shot:



Again, my photography skills lack severely. There looks like there is rust still on the blade from that photo, but I can assure you, it's not there. There is still some discoloration on the blade, but I was hesitant to get to deep since there was still an etch on the blade that I wanted to preserve. The handle for this one was still in pretty darn good shape too, so there was no need to really monkey around with that either.

I did do a cleaning with mineral spirits, just a quick wipe-down really, but it perked the wood up just a notch.

Now, this saw is NOT ready for work. Besides being horribly dull, there's some unevenness in the blade near the toe. It's nothing a hammer wouldn't fix, but I just haven't had a chance to try and fix yet. Luckily, I have a great tutorial on just this kind of thing bookmarked, and I'll be taking a closer look in the near future.

All in all, this was a nice project to do to kill an hour or so. The results were definitely worth the effort, and I'm actually eager to find another saw to restore!
 

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Norvell Shapleigh Panel Saw restoration

At the same time I got my Disston D-8, I picked up this little gem. The seller on eBay saw the word Shapleigh inside the diamond logo, and recognized it for what it was. What he didn't see was the Norvell before it. The seller felt that this was likely a Harvey Peace saw, and after some research, I have to agree. It looks an awful lot like a P-26. Unfortunately, this looks like it was made after the Disston buy-out, since the medallion simply says "Warranted Superior". Still, it's a cool saw. So, without further ado, here's the before pic:



As you can tell, this thing was in pretty rough shape, but not as bad as the Disston I posted about earlier. Well, it was and it wasn't. The Disston was more discolored, but this one had more deep rust. Still, I took the mineral spirits and 320 grit sand paper to this puppy and cleaned it right up.

Here is your after shot:



Again, my photography skills lack severely. There looks like there is rust still on the blade from that photo, but I can assure you, it's not there. There is still some discoloration on the blade, but I was hesitant to get to deep since there was still an etch on the blade that I wanted to preserve. The handle for this one was still in pretty darn good shape too, so there was no need to really monkey around with that either.

I did do a cleaning with mineral spirits, just a quick wipe-down really, but it perked the wood up just a notch.

Now, this saw is NOT ready for work. Besides being horribly dull, there's some unevenness in the blade near the toe. It's nothing a hammer wouldn't fix, but I just haven't had a chance to try and fix yet. Luckily, I have a great tutorial on just this kind of thing bookmarked, and I'll be taking a closer look in the near future.

All in all, this was a nice project to do to kill an hour or so. The results were definitely worth the effort, and I'm actually eager to find another saw to restore!
The end of the picture is cut off so I can't tell, but is that an old electric model?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Norvell Shapleigh Panel Saw restoration

At the same time I got my Disston D-8, I picked up this little gem. The seller on eBay saw the word Shapleigh inside the diamond logo, and recognized it for what it was. What he didn't see was the Norvell before it. The seller felt that this was likely a Harvey Peace saw, and after some research, I have to agree. It looks an awful lot like a P-26. Unfortunately, this looks like it was made after the Disston buy-out, since the medallion simply says "Warranted Superior". Still, it's a cool saw. So, without further ado, here's the before pic:



As you can tell, this thing was in pretty rough shape, but not as bad as the Disston I posted about earlier. Well, it was and it wasn't. The Disston was more discolored, but this one had more deep rust. Still, I took the mineral spirits and 320 grit sand paper to this puppy and cleaned it right up.

Here is your after shot:



Again, my photography skills lack severely. There looks like there is rust still on the blade from that photo, but I can assure you, it's not there. There is still some discoloration on the blade, but I was hesitant to get to deep since there was still an etch on the blade that I wanted to preserve. The handle for this one was still in pretty darn good shape too, so there was no need to really monkey around with that either.

I did do a cleaning with mineral spirits, just a quick wipe-down really, but it perked the wood up just a notch.

Now, this saw is NOT ready for work. Besides being horribly dull, there's some unevenness in the blade near the toe. It's nothing a hammer wouldn't fix, but I just haven't had a chance to try and fix yet. Luckily, I have a great tutorial on just this kind of thing bookmarked, and I'll be taking a closer look in the near future.

All in all, this was a nice project to do to kill an hour or so. The results were definitely worth the effort, and I'm actually eager to find another saw to restore!
Actually Todd, if you click on it the full pic opens up. I have no idea why that happens on here.

As for it being an old electric model, it's actually an early cordless model ;)
 
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