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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Interesting idea
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
I will definitely be making some dog holes in a couple handscrew clamps. Great idea, thanks for posting!
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Oooh. Good idea. I'll be doing gluing in some dowels shortly. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
It is so quick and easy and it is amazing how useful they become.
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
great idea! thanks for the post.
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Cool idea! Thanks for sharing.
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
clever idea
consider it as officialy stolen from you…....LOL

thank´s for sharing

Dennis
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
I probably should point out that Rockler has their 8" handscrews on sale right now for $4.99. They aren't as solidly built as my Jorgensen's and one of the handles was not quite straight, but they work well for a great price.
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Swirt, I bought 10 of 'em last time they were on sale. Yeah, they're no Jorgensen's, but for the price they're great for "sure, I'll drill a ¾" hole in 'em and stuff a dowel in and see what happens!"
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Unique and useful idea. I will file this one in my memory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
LOL Dan, notice I mounted the peg in my Rockler's and into my Jorgensen's ;) (not that the peg would damage either of them in any way)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
oops supposed to read "...and NOT into my Jorgensens"
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Swirt I am building a small bench that will sit on top of my existing bench. I want to get my dovetails up enough to see them. I have looked at easy ways to set up a simple vise. I was going with a pipe clamp system. Dude this is the ticket. Its modular and with simple dog holes the setups are endless. If I break something its an easy replacement. Thanks;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Enjoy SuperDav. I use mine quite often. My only complaint is that the dog peg sticking out the side makes them not fit on a rack as nicely as a non-dogged handscrew, and that is a pretty minor complaint.

The trick is to stay fluid in your thinking about how to use them. There are a lot of options.

Hmmm dovetails close enough to see them… you mean you can't just stoop and squint like I do? ;)
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Ditto superD, Man the best ideas are always the KISS ones. I like the way your brain works. Consider this idea stolen. Now I have to go pray for a crop failure for all these wild oats I've been sowing.
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
I hear ya Rand Keep It Simple Stupid. Wild oats, you just go enjoy that new saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
SImple Stupid ...that's me ;)

SuperDav, On your dedicated dovetailing bench, depending on how you design it, if you set it up so there are a row of dog holes close to the edge that make it so that the inner face of the handscrew clamp is flush with the edge of the bench, then the pair of handscrew dogs make a pretty effective dovetailing vice similar in function to the one Chris Schwarz made so popular a year or so ago.
 

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Handscrew Dogs

If you have 3/4" bench dog holes on your bench and a couple of handscrew clamps then in 10 minutes you can merge the two into a very flexible and powerful clamping system that works with small boards, long boards and even irregular pieces. I'll let the photos tell the story … and keep in mind, the modification to the handscrew does not prevent you from using it as an ordinary handscrew too. I use them on my workbench and my sawbenches.










Clicking on any of the photos will take you to the more detailed explanation.

There are only three real considerations:
1) The hole you drill for the peg should be plumb, so use a drill press if you can.
2) Oak or other hardwood dowel is better than poplar or other soft wood.
3) Regarding the size of the handscrew. Larger handscrews limit how close they can work together, but smaller handscrews limit the maximium opening of the jaws. I like the 6 or 8" handscrews but size them based on your needs.
Swirt that's what I was going to do. I want the dowel arranged so the clamp is flush with the face of the bench. Thanks as always.
 
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