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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A little more about using shelving paper

Hi All!
I am not sure if any of you who commented on my original tip about using the adhesive shelving paper as a way to attach a scrollsaw pattern to a project. But I have done several projects using this tip now so I thought it was time to share my feelings and such about it.
Love Hate
Yeah, I developed a real love hate relationship with this tip. I love it because the vinyl sticks so nicely to the project and does not leave behind adhesive residue. But the hate sometimes makes me wonder why I use it.
What is there to hate?
Well I have lots of trouble with the ink not really totally drying on the vinyl and smudging the pattern if I happen to run my hand across it. I have thought about spraying a thin film of matte finish, like what you can buy to spray over a photograph. The matte finish can be found at any craft store. But then I stop and consider the possibility that the matte might get on the project or that it may cause the vinyl to roll up or deform. Plus I have not smudged anything so badly that I could not make out the lines.
One other negative thing, is cutting the damn vinyl. It is easily done. But having to cut it to size is a pain in butt. It is easier if you have a paper cutter that can handle the width of the roll. Or, just do what I thought was best and that was to layout and cut the entire roll at once. Then you have a stack of 8.5 X 11 sheets of vinyl pages just waiting to be printed on. Also consider that you really have to fill the entire page with duplicate patterns or some other pattern. Because once you cut a section of the sheet out, you will not be able to feed it through the printer again.
Of course, if you have a few hundred dollars laying around. You could use what one LJ suggested (a cricut). Don't get me wrong, these are cool machines. They work very well, and you can now connect them to your computer and use it to cutout patterns on a wide range of media, even thin gauge metal. If your spouse does scrap booking or does similar crafts. Well you could split the use of the machine and maybe the cost. LOL.
I am not ready to through in the towel on using the vinyl. I like its ease of use and no residue on the project so much that I put up with the other negative things. But I am considering the purchase of a Cricut to cut down on any waste when it comes to cutting the vinyl into sheets and printing on those sheets. Just be sure that if you do buy a Cricut yourself, that you buy the Expressions (at this time it is the biggest of the machines). It is the most expensive of them but the wide range of media or stock, the sizes it can handle, etc. it is worth it. The smaller cheaper machines would severely limit your patter sizes, media, paper, or stock sizes.
In Closing
I am going to continue to use vinyl shelving paper to print patterns on and to affix them to projects. I will also continue for now, cutting up the rolls entirely at one time, and try to find a way to minimize the ink smudging. I just like the convenience and that fact that is cheap. But I will be looking into a Cricut as well.
I hope you find this information useful and imformative enough for you decide if you really want to use the tip.

As always! Keep making sawdust!
 

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A little more about using shelving paper

Hi All!
I am not sure if any of you who commented on my original tip about using the adhesive shelving paper as a way to attach a scrollsaw pattern to a project. But I have done several projects using this tip now so I thought it was time to share my feelings and such about it.
Love Hate
Yeah, I developed a real love hate relationship with this tip. I love it because the vinyl sticks so nicely to the project and does not leave behind adhesive residue. But the hate sometimes makes me wonder why I use it.
What is there to hate?
Well I have lots of trouble with the ink not really totally drying on the vinyl and smudging the pattern if I happen to run my hand across it. I have thought about spraying a thin film of matte finish, like what you can buy to spray over a photograph. The matte finish can be found at any craft store. But then I stop and consider the possibility that the matte might get on the project or that it may cause the vinyl to roll up or deform. Plus I have not smudged anything so badly that I could not make out the lines.
One other negative thing, is cutting the damn vinyl. It is easily done. But having to cut it to size is a pain in butt. It is easier if you have a paper cutter that can handle the width of the roll. Or, just do what I thought was best and that was to layout and cut the entire roll at once. Then you have a stack of 8.5 X 11 sheets of vinyl pages just waiting to be printed on. Also consider that you really have to fill the entire page with duplicate patterns or some other pattern. Because once you cut a section of the sheet out, you will not be able to feed it through the printer again.
Of course, if you have a few hundred dollars laying around. You could use what one LJ suggested (a cricut). Don't get me wrong, these are cool machines. They work very well, and you can now connect them to your computer and use it to cutout patterns on a wide range of media, even thin gauge metal. If your spouse does scrap booking or does similar crafts. Well you could split the use of the machine and maybe the cost. LOL.
I am not ready to through in the towel on using the vinyl. I like its ease of use and no residue on the project so much that I put up with the other negative things. But I am considering the purchase of a Cricut to cut down on any waste when it comes to cutting the vinyl into sheets and printing on those sheets. Just be sure that if you do buy a Cricut yourself, that you buy the Expressions (at this time it is the biggest of the machines). It is the most expensive of them but the wide range of media or stock, the sizes it can handle, etc. it is worth it. The smaller cheaper machines would severely limit your patter sizes, media, paper, or stock sizes.
In Closing
I am going to continue to use vinyl shelving paper to print patterns on and to affix them to projects. I will also continue for now, cutting up the rolls entirely at one time, and try to find a way to minimize the ink smudging. I just like the convenience and that fact that is cheap. But I will be looking into a Cricut as well.
I hope you find this information useful and imformative enough for you decide if you really want to use the tip.

As always! Keep making sawdust!
When I taught school we used transparency paper that went into the copy machine to make an overhead transparency. They sell that stuff at Staples and Office Max. It is standard size and fits through regular printers. Then I imagine you could just spray that sticky stuff to the back of the transparency. That's what I would try.
 

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A little more about using shelving paper

Hi All!
I am not sure if any of you who commented on my original tip about using the adhesive shelving paper as a way to attach a scrollsaw pattern to a project. But I have done several projects using this tip now so I thought it was time to share my feelings and such about it.
Love Hate
Yeah, I developed a real love hate relationship with this tip. I love it because the vinyl sticks so nicely to the project and does not leave behind adhesive residue. But the hate sometimes makes me wonder why I use it.
What is there to hate?
Well I have lots of trouble with the ink not really totally drying on the vinyl and smudging the pattern if I happen to run my hand across it. I have thought about spraying a thin film of matte finish, like what you can buy to spray over a photograph. The matte finish can be found at any craft store. But then I stop and consider the possibility that the matte might get on the project or that it may cause the vinyl to roll up or deform. Plus I have not smudged anything so badly that I could not make out the lines.
One other negative thing, is cutting the damn vinyl. It is easily done. But having to cut it to size is a pain in butt. It is easier if you have a paper cutter that can handle the width of the roll. Or, just do what I thought was best and that was to layout and cut the entire roll at once. Then you have a stack of 8.5 X 11 sheets of vinyl pages just waiting to be printed on. Also consider that you really have to fill the entire page with duplicate patterns or some other pattern. Because once you cut a section of the sheet out, you will not be able to feed it through the printer again.
Of course, if you have a few hundred dollars laying around. You could use what one LJ suggested (a cricut). Don't get me wrong, these are cool machines. They work very well, and you can now connect them to your computer and use it to cutout patterns on a wide range of media, even thin gauge metal. If your spouse does scrap booking or does similar crafts. Well you could split the use of the machine and maybe the cost. LOL.
I am not ready to through in the towel on using the vinyl. I like its ease of use and no residue on the project so much that I put up with the other negative things. But I am considering the purchase of a Cricut to cut down on any waste when it comes to cutting the vinyl into sheets and printing on those sheets. Just be sure that if you do buy a Cricut yourself, that you buy the Expressions (at this time it is the biggest of the machines). It is the most expensive of them but the wide range of media or stock, the sizes it can handle, etc. it is worth it. The smaller cheaper machines would severely limit your patter sizes, media, paper, or stock sizes.
In Closing
I am going to continue to use vinyl shelving paper to print patterns on and to affix them to projects. I will also continue for now, cutting up the rolls entirely at one time, and try to find a way to minimize the ink smudging. I just like the convenience and that fact that is cheap. But I will be looking into a Cricut as well.
I hope you find this information useful and imformative enough for you decide if you really want to use the tip.

As always! Keep making sawdust!
Rivergirl, thanks for that info I never heard of transparency paper.
 

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A little more about using shelving paper

Hi All!
I am not sure if any of you who commented on my original tip about using the adhesive shelving paper as a way to attach a scrollsaw pattern to a project. But I have done several projects using this tip now so I thought it was time to share my feelings and such about it.
Love Hate
Yeah, I developed a real love hate relationship with this tip. I love it because the vinyl sticks so nicely to the project and does not leave behind adhesive residue. But the hate sometimes makes me wonder why I use it.
What is there to hate?
Well I have lots of trouble with the ink not really totally drying on the vinyl and smudging the pattern if I happen to run my hand across it. I have thought about spraying a thin film of matte finish, like what you can buy to spray over a photograph. The matte finish can be found at any craft store. But then I stop and consider the possibility that the matte might get on the project or that it may cause the vinyl to roll up or deform. Plus I have not smudged anything so badly that I could not make out the lines.
One other negative thing, is cutting the damn vinyl. It is easily done. But having to cut it to size is a pain in butt. It is easier if you have a paper cutter that can handle the width of the roll. Or, just do what I thought was best and that was to layout and cut the entire roll at once. Then you have a stack of 8.5 X 11 sheets of vinyl pages just waiting to be printed on. Also consider that you really have to fill the entire page with duplicate patterns or some other pattern. Because once you cut a section of the sheet out, you will not be able to feed it through the printer again.
Of course, if you have a few hundred dollars laying around. You could use what one LJ suggested (a cricut). Don't get me wrong, these are cool machines. They work very well, and you can now connect them to your computer and use it to cutout patterns on a wide range of media, even thin gauge metal. If your spouse does scrap booking or does similar crafts. Well you could split the use of the machine and maybe the cost. LOL.
I am not ready to through in the towel on using the vinyl. I like its ease of use and no residue on the project so much that I put up with the other negative things. But I am considering the purchase of a Cricut to cut down on any waste when it comes to cutting the vinyl into sheets and printing on those sheets. Just be sure that if you do buy a Cricut yourself, that you buy the Expressions (at this time it is the biggest of the machines). It is the most expensive of them but the wide range of media or stock, the sizes it can handle, etc. it is worth it. The smaller cheaper machines would severely limit your patter sizes, media, paper, or stock sizes.
In Closing
I am going to continue to use vinyl shelving paper to print patterns on and to affix them to projects. I will also continue for now, cutting up the rolls entirely at one time, and try to find a way to minimize the ink smudging. I just like the convenience and that fact that is cheap. But I will be looking into a Cricut as well.
I hope you find this information useful and imformative enough for you decide if you really want to use the tip.

As always! Keep making sawdust!
Before computers I used to use transparency paper to copy pictures from books because I can't draw for beans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update to using contact paper to apply scrollsaw and other patterns

Hey!
You know I just hate it when find out that I have not done or tried everything to make something work. In this case if you remember. I had previously posted a tip for using shelving or contact paper to stick patterns especially scroll saw patterns to wood.

Well a couple of days ago I got my usual WoodWorkers Guild of America newsletter. Which if you do not get this newsletter I suggest signing up for it. At the bottom of the newsletter I saw "Intarsia Pattern Tip" done by Joni VanDusartz. I don't know Joni, but am always looking at anything to do with patterns and I have a desire to try Intarsia one day. So I watched the video and by the end of it I was like "Daaahhhhhh!"

Which was followed by a few obligatory smacks to the head.

Joni demonstrates using contact paper for applying patterns to Intarsia projects. The dah moment came when she sprayed adhesive on the contact or shelving paper and glued the printed pattern onto the contact paper. Then she cut it out, and applied the contact paper to the wood.

Well of course doing this eliminates the smudging problem I spoke about in my last blog entry about this tip. Since the pattern is printed on regular paper, the ink from the ink jet printer is not just sitting on top of the contact paper (never fully drying) and smudging as you try to make your cuts.

Even though this was a dah moment for me, I was also glad that I ran across this as I am a real fan of using the contact paper. It is cheap, it removes easily from your project without leaving a residue behind which would make you have to try to sand it off. Plus as Joni points out too. You can reposition the pattern a number of times. It gives your chance to look at the pattern and the wood and decide if that really is where you want the pattern to lay.

So with all that said. I am sure Joni will never see this, but just in case. Thank you for the dah moment and also thank you to WoodWorkers Guild of America for including that video in your latest newsletter.

From now on, I will be gluing my patterns to the contact paper and then after some trimming of the paper I will using the contact paper to affix my patterns to my work piece.
 
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