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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pop's Hand Planes

So after my last post, "Am I in trouble" (of becoming a Galoot), i have decided to write my first ever blog "The Slippery Slope" chronicalling my decent into the world of hand tools .. finding them, cleaning and restoring, and using. Im not sure how far this will go but here's to givin it a shot ….

My grandfather passed away a few years ago and in the process of cleaning out the house i stumbled across all of the old tools in the basement. Mostly mechanics tools, he was a diesel and heavy equipment mechanic, but mixed in were a bunch of wood working tools. I had dabbled a little with wood working at the time and found i had enjoyed it, so i thought what better way to remember Pop than to have some of his old tools, clean em up and show em off.





This was one of my grandfathers planes .. or quite possibly my great grandfathers block plane. It's an early Stanley #9 1/2 with a patnent date of 10-12-97 on it. Its not nearly 100%, the cheek is broken and missing the mouth adjustment lever but an heirloom to me.





Another one of my grand or great grandfathers hand planes. An early Stanley #18 with a split knuckle cap. Patent date Dec. 28 86 This one is in great shape but may or may not be missing the mouth adjustment lever.. another one that i hope to pass down to the next generation.

Welll fellow LJ's i hope that you will enjoy my trip down the slippery slope …

- Chris
 

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Pop's Hand Planes

So after my last post, "Am I in trouble" (of becoming a Galoot), i have decided to write my first ever blog "The Slippery Slope" chronicalling my decent into the world of hand tools .. finding them, cleaning and restoring, and using. Im not sure how far this will go but here's to givin it a shot ….

My grandfather passed away a few years ago and in the process of cleaning out the house i stumbled across all of the old tools in the basement. Mostly mechanics tools, he was a diesel and heavy equipment mechanic, but mixed in were a bunch of wood working tools. I had dabbled a little with wood working at the time and found i had enjoyed it, so i thought what better way to remember Pop than to have some of his old tools, clean em up and show em off.





This was one of my grandfathers planes .. or quite possibly my great grandfathers block plane. It's an early Stanley #9 1/2 with a patnent date of 10-12-97 on it. Its not nearly 100%, the cheek is broken and missing the mouth adjustment lever but an heirloom to me.





Another one of my grand or great grandfathers hand planes. An early Stanley #18 with a split knuckle cap. Patent date Dec. 28 86 This one is in great shape but may or may not be missing the mouth adjustment lever.. another one that i hope to pass down to the next generation.

Welll fellow LJ's i hope that you will enjoy my trip down the slippery slope …

- Chris
huu they look great
even thow the cheek is broken on one of them
and thank´s for the story I realy hope you have saved all his tool
or at least let them had a new good home

thank´s for sharing

Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Pop's Hand Planes

So after my last post, "Am I in trouble" (of becoming a Galoot), i have decided to write my first ever blog "The Slippery Slope" chronicalling my decent into the world of hand tools .. finding them, cleaning and restoring, and using. Im not sure how far this will go but here's to givin it a shot ….

My grandfather passed away a few years ago and in the process of cleaning out the house i stumbled across all of the old tools in the basement. Mostly mechanics tools, he was a diesel and heavy equipment mechanic, but mixed in were a bunch of wood working tools. I had dabbled a little with wood working at the time and found i had enjoyed it, so i thought what better way to remember Pop than to have some of his old tools, clean em up and show em off.





This was one of my grandfathers planes .. or quite possibly my great grandfathers block plane. It's an early Stanley #9 1/2 with a patnent date of 10-12-97 on it. Its not nearly 100%, the cheek is broken and missing the mouth adjustment lever but an heirloom to me.





Another one of my grand or great grandfathers hand planes. An early Stanley #18 with a split knuckle cap. Patent date Dec. 28 86 This one is in great shape but may or may not be missing the mouth adjustment lever.. another one that i hope to pass down to the next generation.

Welll fellow LJ's i hope that you will enjoy my trip down the slippery slope …

- Chris
Dennis,

I do have all the tools that i acquired from him, and hope to hand them down some day .. over the next few days or so i'll be posting the rest of them as part of this blog.
 

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Pop's Hand Planes

So after my last post, "Am I in trouble" (of becoming a Galoot), i have decided to write my first ever blog "The Slippery Slope" chronicalling my decent into the world of hand tools .. finding them, cleaning and restoring, and using. Im not sure how far this will go but here's to givin it a shot ….

My grandfather passed away a few years ago and in the process of cleaning out the house i stumbled across all of the old tools in the basement. Mostly mechanics tools, he was a diesel and heavy equipment mechanic, but mixed in were a bunch of wood working tools. I had dabbled a little with wood working at the time and found i had enjoyed it, so i thought what better way to remember Pop than to have some of his old tools, clean em up and show em off.





This was one of my grandfathers planes .. or quite possibly my great grandfathers block plane. It's an early Stanley #9 1/2 with a patnent date of 10-12-97 on it. Its not nearly 100%, the cheek is broken and missing the mouth adjustment lever but an heirloom to me.





Another one of my grand or great grandfathers hand planes. An early Stanley #18 with a split knuckle cap. Patent date Dec. 28 86 This one is in great shape but may or may not be missing the mouth adjustment lever.. another one that i hope to pass down to the next generation.

Welll fellow LJ's i hope that you will enjoy my trip down the slippery slope …

- Chris
Wish you a wonderful travel, and yes what better way to remember him than to use those tools.
Best thoughts,
MaFe
 

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Pop's Hand Planes

So after my last post, "Am I in trouble" (of becoming a Galoot), i have decided to write my first ever blog "The Slippery Slope" chronicalling my decent into the world of hand tools .. finding them, cleaning and restoring, and using. Im not sure how far this will go but here's to givin it a shot ….

My grandfather passed away a few years ago and in the process of cleaning out the house i stumbled across all of the old tools in the basement. Mostly mechanics tools, he was a diesel and heavy equipment mechanic, but mixed in were a bunch of wood working tools. I had dabbled a little with wood working at the time and found i had enjoyed it, so i thought what better way to remember Pop than to have some of his old tools, clean em up and show em off.





This was one of my grandfathers planes .. or quite possibly my great grandfathers block plane. It's an early Stanley #9 1/2 with a patnent date of 10-12-97 on it. Its not nearly 100%, the cheek is broken and missing the mouth adjustment lever but an heirloom to me.





Another one of my grand or great grandfathers hand planes. An early Stanley #18 with a split knuckle cap. Patent date Dec. 28 86 This one is in great shape but may or may not be missing the mouth adjustment lever.. another one that i hope to pass down to the next generation.

Welll fellow LJ's i hope that you will enjoy my trip down the slippery slope …

- Chris
Looks like a great beginning. ebay is a good source of old parts like adjustment levers.
 

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Pop's Hand Planes

So after my last post, "Am I in trouble" (of becoming a Galoot), i have decided to write my first ever blog "The Slippery Slope" chronicalling my decent into the world of hand tools .. finding them, cleaning and restoring, and using. Im not sure how far this will go but here's to givin it a shot ….

My grandfather passed away a few years ago and in the process of cleaning out the house i stumbled across all of the old tools in the basement. Mostly mechanics tools, he was a diesel and heavy equipment mechanic, but mixed in were a bunch of wood working tools. I had dabbled a little with wood working at the time and found i had enjoyed it, so i thought what better way to remember Pop than to have some of his old tools, clean em up and show em off.





This was one of my grandfathers planes .. or quite possibly my great grandfathers block plane. It's an early Stanley #9 1/2 with a patnent date of 10-12-97 on it. Its not nearly 100%, the cheek is broken and missing the mouth adjustment lever but an heirloom to me.





Another one of my grand or great grandfathers hand planes. An early Stanley #18 with a split knuckle cap. Patent date Dec. 28 86 This one is in great shape but may or may not be missing the mouth adjustment lever.. another one that i hope to pass down to the next generation.

Welll fellow LJ's i hope that you will enjoy my trip down the slippery slope …

- Chris
I will look forward to see them :)

Dennis
 

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Pop's Hand Planes

So after my last post, "Am I in trouble" (of becoming a Galoot), i have decided to write my first ever blog "The Slippery Slope" chronicalling my decent into the world of hand tools .. finding them, cleaning and restoring, and using. Im not sure how far this will go but here's to givin it a shot ….

My grandfather passed away a few years ago and in the process of cleaning out the house i stumbled across all of the old tools in the basement. Mostly mechanics tools, he was a diesel and heavy equipment mechanic, but mixed in were a bunch of wood working tools. I had dabbled a little with wood working at the time and found i had enjoyed it, so i thought what better way to remember Pop than to have some of his old tools, clean em up and show em off.





This was one of my grandfathers planes .. or quite possibly my great grandfathers block plane. It's an early Stanley #9 1/2 with a patnent date of 10-12-97 on it. Its not nearly 100%, the cheek is broken and missing the mouth adjustment lever but an heirloom to me.





Another one of my grand or great grandfathers hand planes. An early Stanley #18 with a split knuckle cap. Patent date Dec. 28 86 This one is in great shape but may or may not be missing the mouth adjustment lever.. another one that i hope to pass down to the next generation.

Welll fellow LJ's i hope that you will enjoy my trip down the slippery slope …

- Chris
Enjoy the slide! I have been, still does, for some time now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
 

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Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
Nice find Chris. I work in a 9ft x 9ft space, so a table saw is not on the cards for me. Just as well I like using hand tools. Personally, I really enjoy hand sawing (even ripping) and it can be very satisfying as long as the saws are sharp :)
 

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Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
waow you realy hit a treasure filled box with that basement :)
don´t worry about all the green light you see in the horisont around you
it is just all the other handtool L Js including me with open mouth

my adwise to you is get everything home from that basement
and give it at least an oiltreatment before you store it and then when you have time read
alot about old tools and how they are used
and then between projects clean them ,tune them and bring them back to use in the toolbox
one at a time so you have time to learn how they behave and can/shuold be used
some of them is even maybee collecters items so take care you don´t destroy them with
tooo much restoring

enjoy the journey with the tools
Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
Dennis,

Ive had the tools for almost 2 years now and between myself, my cousin and my uncle we all took most of the tools. And like you have suggested between projects i have been cleaning them up. The pics shown are them as clean as i can get them without going nuts. Ive got a couple of coats of paste wax on the them .. in your opinion is that enough to keep them from rusting up?

Eventually id like to clean up the tools my uncle and cousin have so that they can be once again passed on.

Brit:
I havent gotten around to sharpening the saws in fear of screwin em up but one day id like to do a hand tools project, maybe a small coffee table or something. It must be nice without all the noise and dust.

Thanks for reading fellas … more to come
 

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Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
Those are all very nice. I believe the last saw in the list (the pointy one) is called a ship point saw. Yours looks like it has been sharpened a bunch of times throughout its life. You can tell this not only from the narrow tip at the end of the saw, but also the teeth are very close to the etch.

You've probably already seen this but just in case
http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/shippointsaw.html
 

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Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
Nice looking saws! Paste wax is a short term solution, especially if you live in a humid climate. If the place you have gotten them from was in a high humidity environment, the damage may be already done. Manufacturers use a coating of Cosmoline ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmoline) when shipping iron products overseas to keep them from rusting. You don't need to do that here. If you want to prohibit further deterioration of these saws, simply clean them and spray a coat of finish on them. Paint works fine if you are not using them anytime soon. You can remove paint a lot more easily then adding metal to replace the rust. Just be sure to cover the wood parts so they don't get painted. I recently bought a Record lathe that was over 20 years old and still had the Cosmoline on it (the guy never even put it together!). Paint thinner, a cloth and a lot of elbow grease will take it all off.
 

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Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
I don´t know what is the best way to protect them other than using them ..LOL
but isue of sharpening the saws I think one of the best way to learn it beside learning
by having a master at oyur side to guide you is to see the DVD Lie-Neilsen sell
hosted by Tom Law with the title Hand Saw Sharpening
and here is the link just scroll down to it

http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?grp=1320

good luck
Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
Thanks Dennis … I just picked up a book on sharpening from the library and along with the video link you sent hopefully i will be able to give these saws a full restore, sharpened and all !

On a side not … if you look in the first picture it looks like someone had punched a "T" into the blade. My grandfathers name was Vincent but everyone called him Jim (his middle name) ... hmm i wondered … so i called my mother. "Hey mom what was your grandfathers first name … Anthony … or Tony for short."

This will mark the 4th generation .. priceless.
 

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Pop's Basement Treasures

With the excitment of stumbling upon those early handplanes, my interest in woodworking now reaching new heights , i dig deeper into the treasures sitting in my grandfathers basement:

Among the many coffee cans, cigar boxes, drawers, and shelves were sitting a bunch of hand saws. I never thought of having a use for an old handsaw and i certainly didn't see any value to them either, but these were Pop's (my deceased grandfather), "i bet they would look kinda cool in my man room", i thought to myself.

So i brought home another box of old rusty tools that probaly hadn't seen the light of day in 30 years. Among them 3 hand saws and a drawknife. After a cleaning my pot of gold continues to grow.

Rectangle Wood Handwriting Grey Road surface


Tool Knife Sleeve Hunting knife Wood


Turns out this old saw had some value to it … A Henry Disston #7 - dated around 1912, nib still on it and everything. As with the block planes i inherited, these saws possibly outdated my grandfather. Its very possible that these tools have become a 4th generation heirloom.

Wood Handwriting Grey Rectangle Font


Tool Knife Utility knife Blade Hunting knife


..... And a Disston D8 dated 1920's

Wood Textile Grey Font Flooring


Sleeve Linens Beige Wood Carmine


... And a Disston D7 dated to the 1920's

Rectangle Grey Font Metal Pattern


Sleeve Wood Bag Beige Linens


Finally a T.H. Witherby Drawknife manufactured in Winsted CT.

Until the next round .. thanks for readin the ramblings of a young man sliding his was down the slippery slope of hand tool infatuation.
fanstastic to hear and when you do it my surgestion is that you do it on the top of the blade close
to the handle , or on the handle ,give you a bigger chance of doing it with out making a kink in the blade
I know its maybee being too scary but why taking the risk :)

take care
Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Pop's Toolbox

I know that its been a while but ive been busy working aorund the house and working on a coffee table for my father for Christmas but here is the latest installment of "The Slippery Slope".

I started this blog with the anticipation of chronicalling my slide down the slope toward becoming a Galoot, or at least a wannabe Galoot, but it has taken kind of a funny turn. Yesterday my grandmother unfortunately passed away after 88 years on this Earth. She's found her way upstairs to be with my Grandfather once again where im sure right now they are making macoroni, Pop is sipping a glass of wine, and Gram is listening to Harry Belefonti.

Ive always adored my grandparents, my grandfather especially, the both hold a very large piece of my heart and have taught me many life lessons that cant be read from a book or learned in school. So with a bit of a heavy heart tonight i present to my firends here at Lumberjocks with a toolbox in memory of both my grandparents.

Sentimentally, this toolbox is filled with all of the life tools i have been taught by generations past. The devotion of family, the need to return a favor, the importance of a nice gesture, and the strength one must posess to roll with the punches and live life to the fullest.

My grandfather wasnt a woodworker, he was a heavy equipment mechanic, but my great-grandfather was a carpenter and at one point in time he worked at the local lumberyard. I found this toolbox full of glass tools, mostly glass cutters and whatnot. Where they came from and who's they were im not sure. All i know is that at one point in time it was Pop's and it sits right underneath the television in our den to remind me of all that has been taught, and what i can do to teach others what has been so gracefully bestowed on me.

So now that all the sappy stuff is over .. here's the toolbox!

Wood Rectangle Gas Natural material Trunk


Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Wood stain Scale


I didn't do too much to the toolbox.I took all of the brass hardware off, give it a good bath in WD-40 and a good scrubbing with a scotch brite pad. The box itself got a quick hand sanding with some 150 then 220 to get rid of the grit and grime that was all over it after probably 75 years in a basement. A coat of poly and paste wax and that was it.

I hope to pass this toolbox down along with the other tools from Pop to the next generation and can only hope that i can fill a toolbox up for someone else. Wishing everyone here at Lumberjocks a wonderful holiday and a great new year!!
 

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Pop's Toolbox

I know that its been a while but ive been busy working aorund the house and working on a coffee table for my father for Christmas but here is the latest installment of "The Slippery Slope".

I started this blog with the anticipation of chronicalling my slide down the slope toward becoming a Galoot, or at least a wannabe Galoot, but it has taken kind of a funny turn. Yesterday my grandmother unfortunately passed away after 88 years on this Earth. She's found her way upstairs to be with my Grandfather once again where im sure right now they are making macoroni, Pop is sipping a glass of wine, and Gram is listening to Harry Belefonti.

Ive always adored my grandparents, my grandfather especially, the both hold a very large piece of my heart and have taught me many life lessons that cant be read from a book or learned in school. So with a bit of a heavy heart tonight i present to my firends here at Lumberjocks with a toolbox in memory of both my grandparents.

Sentimentally, this toolbox is filled with all of the life tools i have been taught by generations past. The devotion of family, the need to return a favor, the importance of a nice gesture, and the strength one must posess to roll with the punches and live life to the fullest.

My grandfather wasnt a woodworker, he was a heavy equipment mechanic, but my great-grandfather was a carpenter and at one point in time he worked at the local lumberyard. I found this toolbox full of glass tools, mostly glass cutters and whatnot. Where they came from and who's they were im not sure. All i know is that at one point in time it was Pop's and it sits right underneath the television in our den to remind me of all that has been taught, and what i can do to teach others what has been so gracefully bestowed on me.

So now that all the sappy stuff is over .. here's the toolbox!

Wood Rectangle Gas Natural material Trunk


Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Wood stain Scale


I didn't do too much to the toolbox.I took all of the brass hardware off, give it a good bath in WD-40 and a good scrubbing with a scotch brite pad. The box itself got a quick hand sanding with some 150 then 220 to get rid of the grit and grime that was all over it after probably 75 years in a basement. A coat of poly and paste wax and that was it.

I hope to pass this toolbox down along with the other tools from Pop to the next generation and can only hope that i can fill a toolbox up for someone else. Wishing everyone here at Lumberjocks a wonderful holiday and a great new year!!
Chris, My condolences to you and your family. The way you speak of your Grandparents I'm sure they will be forever happy knowing somone is taking care of their family and belongings they left behind. Have a Merry Christmas my friend.

Dan
 

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Pop's Toolbox

I know that its been a while but ive been busy working aorund the house and working on a coffee table for my father for Christmas but here is the latest installment of "The Slippery Slope".

I started this blog with the anticipation of chronicalling my slide down the slope toward becoming a Galoot, or at least a wannabe Galoot, but it has taken kind of a funny turn. Yesterday my grandmother unfortunately passed away after 88 years on this Earth. She's found her way upstairs to be with my Grandfather once again where im sure right now they are making macoroni, Pop is sipping a glass of wine, and Gram is listening to Harry Belefonti.

Ive always adored my grandparents, my grandfather especially, the both hold a very large piece of my heart and have taught me many life lessons that cant be read from a book or learned in school. So with a bit of a heavy heart tonight i present to my firends here at Lumberjocks with a toolbox in memory of both my grandparents.

Sentimentally, this toolbox is filled with all of the life tools i have been taught by generations past. The devotion of family, the need to return a favor, the importance of a nice gesture, and the strength one must posess to roll with the punches and live life to the fullest.

My grandfather wasnt a woodworker, he was a heavy equipment mechanic, but my great-grandfather was a carpenter and at one point in time he worked at the local lumberyard. I found this toolbox full of glass tools, mostly glass cutters and whatnot. Where they came from and who's they were im not sure. All i know is that at one point in time it was Pop's and it sits right underneath the television in our den to remind me of all that has been taught, and what i can do to teach others what has been so gracefully bestowed on me.

So now that all the sappy stuff is over .. here's the toolbox!

Wood Rectangle Gas Natural material Trunk


Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Wood stain Scale


I didn't do too much to the toolbox.I took all of the brass hardware off, give it a good bath in WD-40 and a good scrubbing with a scotch brite pad. The box itself got a quick hand sanding with some 150 then 220 to get rid of the grit and grime that was all over it after probably 75 years in a basement. A coat of poly and paste wax and that was it.

I hope to pass this toolbox down along with the other tools from Pop to the next generation and can only hope that i can fill a toolbox up for someone else. Wishing everyone here at Lumberjocks a wonderful holiday and a great new year!!
my condolence to you and your fammily
a mighty fine toolbox you bring with you down the slipery slope
its always niice to have old tools with history behind every corner
and even more speciel when it had belong to the fammily for generations
and can be passed furhter to the next generation to come

take care
Dennis
 

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Pop's Toolbox

I know that its been a while but ive been busy working aorund the house and working on a coffee table for my father for Christmas but here is the latest installment of "The Slippery Slope".

I started this blog with the anticipation of chronicalling my slide down the slope toward becoming a Galoot, or at least a wannabe Galoot, but it has taken kind of a funny turn. Yesterday my grandmother unfortunately passed away after 88 years on this Earth. She's found her way upstairs to be with my Grandfather once again where im sure right now they are making macoroni, Pop is sipping a glass of wine, and Gram is listening to Harry Belefonti.

Ive always adored my grandparents, my grandfather especially, the both hold a very large piece of my heart and have taught me many life lessons that cant be read from a book or learned in school. So with a bit of a heavy heart tonight i present to my firends here at Lumberjocks with a toolbox in memory of both my grandparents.

Sentimentally, this toolbox is filled with all of the life tools i have been taught by generations past. The devotion of family, the need to return a favor, the importance of a nice gesture, and the strength one must posess to roll with the punches and live life to the fullest.

My grandfather wasnt a woodworker, he was a heavy equipment mechanic, but my great-grandfather was a carpenter and at one point in time he worked at the local lumberyard. I found this toolbox full of glass tools, mostly glass cutters and whatnot. Where they came from and who's they were im not sure. All i know is that at one point in time it was Pop's and it sits right underneath the television in our den to remind me of all that has been taught, and what i can do to teach others what has been so gracefully bestowed on me.

So now that all the sappy stuff is over .. here's the toolbox!

Wood Rectangle Gas Natural material Trunk


Wood Rectangle Table Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Wood stain Scale


I didn't do too much to the toolbox.I took all of the brass hardware off, give it a good bath in WD-40 and a good scrubbing with a scotch brite pad. The box itself got a quick hand sanding with some 150 then 220 to get rid of the grit and grime that was all over it after probably 75 years in a basement. A coat of poly and paste wax and that was it.

I hope to pass this toolbox down along with the other tools from Pop to the next generation and can only hope that i can fill a toolbox up for someone else. Wishing everyone here at Lumberjocks a wonderful holiday and a great new year!!
Dan / Dennis,

Thank you both very much for your wishes and condolences, they are appreciated.
 

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