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· In Loving Memory
Joined
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8,391 Posts
Old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

Hello friends, I have been meaning to share some tales of a wonderful trip I took at the end of August to upstate NY. Finally I have the chance to get this story and the pictures uploaded. I hope you may enjoy this blog and I thank you for taking a moment and reading….here we go!..........

The road was a winding ride through the beautiful tall green trees of upstate NY. The mountains were a backdrop of a totally peaceful environment showing strength and inviting calm. Around this area the folks that live here operate at a much different pace and lifestyle. You can leave your barn/garage open and go out to the store and you'll come back and everything is still there…lol. Maybe we need to think about that…I guess that should not be such a funny statement should it? Where and how did we lose such an trusted faith in our fellow neighbors in most areas of this great country?

I found the people here very hard working, experienced, easy going but nobody's fool. Many grow up shooting a rifle, crossbow, using a knife, and somehow crime is extremely low in this area, perhaps another lesson for us to ponder in our increasing troubled times and gang growing youth.

It was a nice sunny day and me and my girlfriend were off to visit her dad Topper. My past blog work has included Topper, he's a very interesting character.

To my lucky surprise just at the beginning of a 2 minute ride up the hill to Topper's house we found an older lady having an outside auction in her front yard. We pulled over and took a few minutes to look some things over….no worries, old hand tools appeared! There were at least 8-9 old hollows and rounding planes but far out of whack and way too worn for my latest craving of old relics to tinker with. I rooted around in a bucket of about 15-20 various rusty files, screwdrivers and pieces of this and that although still nothing I could not live without.

Then…..she sat on the edge of the first of 3 tables, rusty, old, and calling my name….a saw vice!!!! Oh boy, was I quick to wrap my hands on that and begin to see what worked and what didn't. The wing nut was half broke off but the actual job of the tool seemed to vice up fine. I figured with some WD-40 to the rescue I could see positive things in using this piece, so I had to get a price for it! I approached the kind old lady and asked "Good afternoon, how much?" "Ten dollars" she replied. I was almost as quick as John Wayne in "The Shootist" drawing that ten dollar bill out of my wallet…lol. I recall past annoying ebay scenarios more than a few times and got tired of the endless bidding for one of these as the prices got so out of hand with the shipping.

But not today, this was a really nice vice and honestly a terrific price for something that worked!

With vice in hand we were onward and upward to Toppers!

I think the cool part of living your life is if you stick around long enough perhaps you may be blessed with meeting a few good and unforgettable people. I have been very lucky to meet some interesting and good folks in my short time. Topper is one of those people. I don't know anyone else like him, he's an outlaw of sorts, a teacher, a joker, a man of incredible instincts. He is not in any way a weekend warrior of hunting, fishing, or wood skills. Topper is a part of the woods and the woods are a part of him. Topper is one of the most respected deer hunters there is in that section of upstate NY.

So you can only imagine the knowledge of many things he shares within 5 minutes of just casual chatter at his kitchen table, take notes…there is a a lot of it..lol.

From the various plants, trees, animals, leaves, guns, knives, beer, deer, venison, poker…haaaa and his beloved China Buffett…lol, I never find spending some time with Topper ever to be boring. As you carry on forward with conversation you take notice of how Topper hears and sees everything, it is amazing his delicate senses to the sounds, although I suppose that is the many years of hunting that have provided him with that and many other skills.

After a well spent afternoon with us three taking a small hike and seeing the various trees, plants and portions of lakes we headed back to his house so I could …..look in his barn….oh yeah…the tool junky within ….took me over…haaaa, get ready friends and let the search begin!

The barn doors opened and that wonderful smell of old wood, engine oil and history rushed into my senses. It was dim inside but once my eyes adjusted the treasures unfolded. A bow saw….a real old school rusty bow saw. A few hickory handled axes in the corner next to his old blue tractor. An old wooden beat to hell tote with some rusty chains intertwined with some nice old drill braces, files, and a rugged small crow bar. A huge eggbeater shoulder drill off to the side with a portion of an old hand plane. A white pale sat towards the one corner and sticking awkwardly in the center of cluttered parts and pieces was a nice old handsaw! I pulled the old lovely out for a look, a ton of caked rust and paint decorated the years of the blade. It had good teeth but was slightly warped, just like me….lmao. Nonetheless I loved it and envisioned in my minds eye of what a good cleaning session could make it look like again.

Here are some photos of the saw before and after:










Topper sat inside the edge of the barn upon his riding mower like a jolly Santa Clause in a junk pile…saying "Take it, I ain't gonna use it."

I was truly like a kid in a country hardware store with all of these fantastic treats that I could clean and possibly use again! Saw sets large and small, a great compadre to my latest saw vice purchase! A shoulder plane, a leather punch, some additional aged jagged this and rusty ole that…the list kept growing!

As the list grew Topper continued "Take it, I ain't gonna use it." What a wonderful gift and I realized he saw the joy in my finds as I continued to contort myself around tractor tires and various boxes of parts searching like a kid on Christmas morning for more toys.

My beautiful girlfriend laughed with her Dad seeing just how much of a goof I was over a pile of things most would be relieved to chuck into the dumpster…hey we all have our own song to sing and mine has melodies of sweet woodcraft and planed pine shavings for all…lol.

Here are a few pics of what I was able to salvage with this hand saw. It is Warranted Superior medallion Dec 27, 1887. It will require some light anvil work to attempt to straighten the blade out more, as well as a nice sharpening that my newly purchased saw vice can provide. If it cannot be used it can remain a wonderful time piece to hang in my shop and enjoy. I really cherish these old tools as most of them were Topper's father's. His dad was a carpenter and some of these very same tools may have been handed down to Topper's Dad from his Grandfather, pretty neat stuff indeed.

It is important to keep these old tools and their owners legacy alive. With caring and a little cleaning we can once again share their history, see their tool marked stories on parts of their beaten bodies of hard work from a past time.

As you drive around some old country roads you never know and it is sure fun to think, what may lie inside some old barn. As the summer high pines stand tall and the waters flow true and strong there can always be old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

The tools as always were only an added bonus for it was the quality of the company that made the entire time a real blast. Perhaps the real favorite of it all was remembering to snap a picture of me and Topper.

It reminds me of a fun moment at lunch we shared. All 3 of us were at the China Buffet…of course…lol. At the end of our pig out fest we in true tradition read our fortune cookies. Topper read his message and it went something like this "You are surrounded by people that care about you" Amen to that, and thank you Topper, your fortune was right on target.

Topper and me.



May all of your fortunes be as great and thank you for reading!

Joe
Nice trip Joe and a good tool day too.
 

· Registered
Joined
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429 Posts
Old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

Hello friends, I have been meaning to share some tales of a wonderful trip I took at the end of August to upstate NY. Finally I have the chance to get this story and the pictures uploaded. I hope you may enjoy this blog and I thank you for taking a moment and reading….here we go!..........

The road was a winding ride through the beautiful tall green trees of upstate NY. The mountains were a backdrop of a totally peaceful environment showing strength and inviting calm. Around this area the folks that live here operate at a much different pace and lifestyle. You can leave your barn/garage open and go out to the store and you'll come back and everything is still there…lol. Maybe we need to think about that…I guess that should not be such a funny statement should it? Where and how did we lose such an trusted faith in our fellow neighbors in most areas of this great country?

I found the people here very hard working, experienced, easy going but nobody's fool. Many grow up shooting a rifle, crossbow, using a knife, and somehow crime is extremely low in this area, perhaps another lesson for us to ponder in our increasing troubled times and gang growing youth.

It was a nice sunny day and me and my girlfriend were off to visit her dad Topper. My past blog work has included Topper, he's a very interesting character.

To my lucky surprise just at the beginning of a 2 minute ride up the hill to Topper's house we found an older lady having an outside auction in her front yard. We pulled over and took a few minutes to look some things over….no worries, old hand tools appeared! There were at least 8-9 old hollows and rounding planes but far out of whack and way too worn for my latest craving of old relics to tinker with. I rooted around in a bucket of about 15-20 various rusty files, screwdrivers and pieces of this and that although still nothing I could not live without.

Then…..she sat on the edge of the first of 3 tables, rusty, old, and calling my name….a saw vice!!!! Oh boy, was I quick to wrap my hands on that and begin to see what worked and what didn't. The wing nut was half broke off but the actual job of the tool seemed to vice up fine. I figured with some WD-40 to the rescue I could see positive things in using this piece, so I had to get a price for it! I approached the kind old lady and asked "Good afternoon, how much?" "Ten dollars" she replied. I was almost as quick as John Wayne in "The Shootist" drawing that ten dollar bill out of my wallet…lol. I recall past annoying ebay scenarios more than a few times and got tired of the endless bidding for one of these as the prices got so out of hand with the shipping.

But not today, this was a really nice vice and honestly a terrific price for something that worked!

With vice in hand we were onward and upward to Toppers!

I think the cool part of living your life is if you stick around long enough perhaps you may be blessed with meeting a few good and unforgettable people. I have been very lucky to meet some interesting and good folks in my short time. Topper is one of those people. I don't know anyone else like him, he's an outlaw of sorts, a teacher, a joker, a man of incredible instincts. He is not in any way a weekend warrior of hunting, fishing, or wood skills. Topper is a part of the woods and the woods are a part of him. Topper is one of the most respected deer hunters there is in that section of upstate NY.

So you can only imagine the knowledge of many things he shares within 5 minutes of just casual chatter at his kitchen table, take notes…there is a a lot of it..lol.

From the various plants, trees, animals, leaves, guns, knives, beer, deer, venison, poker…haaaa and his beloved China Buffett…lol, I never find spending some time with Topper ever to be boring. As you carry on forward with conversation you take notice of how Topper hears and sees everything, it is amazing his delicate senses to the sounds, although I suppose that is the many years of hunting that have provided him with that and many other skills.

After a well spent afternoon with us three taking a small hike and seeing the various trees, plants and portions of lakes we headed back to his house so I could …..look in his barn….oh yeah…the tool junky within ….took me over…haaaa, get ready friends and let the search begin!

The barn doors opened and that wonderful smell of old wood, engine oil and history rushed into my senses. It was dim inside but once my eyes adjusted the treasures unfolded. A bow saw….a real old school rusty bow saw. A few hickory handled axes in the corner next to his old blue tractor. An old wooden beat to hell tote with some rusty chains intertwined with some nice old drill braces, files, and a rugged small crow bar. A huge eggbeater shoulder drill off to the side with a portion of an old hand plane. A white pale sat towards the one corner and sticking awkwardly in the center of cluttered parts and pieces was a nice old handsaw! I pulled the old lovely out for a look, a ton of caked rust and paint decorated the years of the blade. It had good teeth but was slightly warped, just like me….lmao. Nonetheless I loved it and envisioned in my minds eye of what a good cleaning session could make it look like again.

Here are some photos of the saw before and after:










Topper sat inside the edge of the barn upon his riding mower like a jolly Santa Clause in a junk pile…saying "Take it, I ain't gonna use it."

I was truly like a kid in a country hardware store with all of these fantastic treats that I could clean and possibly use again! Saw sets large and small, a great compadre to my latest saw vice purchase! A shoulder plane, a leather punch, some additional aged jagged this and rusty ole that…the list kept growing!

As the list grew Topper continued "Take it, I ain't gonna use it." What a wonderful gift and I realized he saw the joy in my finds as I continued to contort myself around tractor tires and various boxes of parts searching like a kid on Christmas morning for more toys.

My beautiful girlfriend laughed with her Dad seeing just how much of a goof I was over a pile of things most would be relieved to chuck into the dumpster…hey we all have our own song to sing and mine has melodies of sweet woodcraft and planed pine shavings for all…lol.

Here are a few pics of what I was able to salvage with this hand saw. It is Warranted Superior medallion Dec 27, 1887. It will require some light anvil work to attempt to straighten the blade out more, as well as a nice sharpening that my newly purchased saw vice can provide. If it cannot be used it can remain a wonderful time piece to hang in my shop and enjoy. I really cherish these old tools as most of them were Topper's father's. His dad was a carpenter and some of these very same tools may have been handed down to Topper's Dad from his Grandfather, pretty neat stuff indeed.

It is important to keep these old tools and their owners legacy alive. With caring and a little cleaning we can once again share their history, see their tool marked stories on parts of their beaten bodies of hard work from a past time.

As you drive around some old country roads you never know and it is sure fun to think, what may lie inside some old barn. As the summer high pines stand tall and the waters flow true and strong there can always be old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

The tools as always were only an added bonus for it was the quality of the company that made the entire time a real blast. Perhaps the real favorite of it all was remembering to snap a picture of me and Topper.

It reminds me of a fun moment at lunch we shared. All 3 of us were at the China Buffet…of course…lol. At the end of our pig out fest we in true tradition read our fortune cookies. Topper read his message and it went something like this "You are surrounded by people that care about you" Amen to that, and thank you Topper, your fortune was right on target.

Topper and me.



May all of your fortunes be as great and thank you for reading!

Joe
Glad you enjoyed it Joe.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,502 Posts
Old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

Hello friends, I have been meaning to share some tales of a wonderful trip I took at the end of August to upstate NY. Finally I have the chance to get this story and the pictures uploaded. I hope you may enjoy this blog and I thank you for taking a moment and reading….here we go!..........

The road was a winding ride through the beautiful tall green trees of upstate NY. The mountains were a backdrop of a totally peaceful environment showing strength and inviting calm. Around this area the folks that live here operate at a much different pace and lifestyle. You can leave your barn/garage open and go out to the store and you'll come back and everything is still there…lol. Maybe we need to think about that…I guess that should not be such a funny statement should it? Where and how did we lose such an trusted faith in our fellow neighbors in most areas of this great country?

I found the people here very hard working, experienced, easy going but nobody's fool. Many grow up shooting a rifle, crossbow, using a knife, and somehow crime is extremely low in this area, perhaps another lesson for us to ponder in our increasing troubled times and gang growing youth.

It was a nice sunny day and me and my girlfriend were off to visit her dad Topper. My past blog work has included Topper, he's a very interesting character.

To my lucky surprise just at the beginning of a 2 minute ride up the hill to Topper's house we found an older lady having an outside auction in her front yard. We pulled over and took a few minutes to look some things over….no worries, old hand tools appeared! There were at least 8-9 old hollows and rounding planes but far out of whack and way too worn for my latest craving of old relics to tinker with. I rooted around in a bucket of about 15-20 various rusty files, screwdrivers and pieces of this and that although still nothing I could not live without.

Then…..she sat on the edge of the first of 3 tables, rusty, old, and calling my name….a saw vice!!!! Oh boy, was I quick to wrap my hands on that and begin to see what worked and what didn't. The wing nut was half broke off but the actual job of the tool seemed to vice up fine. I figured with some WD-40 to the rescue I could see positive things in using this piece, so I had to get a price for it! I approached the kind old lady and asked "Good afternoon, how much?" "Ten dollars" she replied. I was almost as quick as John Wayne in "The Shootist" drawing that ten dollar bill out of my wallet…lol. I recall past annoying ebay scenarios more than a few times and got tired of the endless bidding for one of these as the prices got so out of hand with the shipping.

But not today, this was a really nice vice and honestly a terrific price for something that worked!

With vice in hand we were onward and upward to Toppers!

I think the cool part of living your life is if you stick around long enough perhaps you may be blessed with meeting a few good and unforgettable people. I have been very lucky to meet some interesting and good folks in my short time. Topper is one of those people. I don't know anyone else like him, he's an outlaw of sorts, a teacher, a joker, a man of incredible instincts. He is not in any way a weekend warrior of hunting, fishing, or wood skills. Topper is a part of the woods and the woods are a part of him. Topper is one of the most respected deer hunters there is in that section of upstate NY.

So you can only imagine the knowledge of many things he shares within 5 minutes of just casual chatter at his kitchen table, take notes…there is a a lot of it..lol.

From the various plants, trees, animals, leaves, guns, knives, beer, deer, venison, poker…haaaa and his beloved China Buffett…lol, I never find spending some time with Topper ever to be boring. As you carry on forward with conversation you take notice of how Topper hears and sees everything, it is amazing his delicate senses to the sounds, although I suppose that is the many years of hunting that have provided him with that and many other skills.

After a well spent afternoon with us three taking a small hike and seeing the various trees, plants and portions of lakes we headed back to his house so I could …..look in his barn….oh yeah…the tool junky within ….took me over…haaaa, get ready friends and let the search begin!

The barn doors opened and that wonderful smell of old wood, engine oil and history rushed into my senses. It was dim inside but once my eyes adjusted the treasures unfolded. A bow saw….a real old school rusty bow saw. A few hickory handled axes in the corner next to his old blue tractor. An old wooden beat to hell tote with some rusty chains intertwined with some nice old drill braces, files, and a rugged small crow bar. A huge eggbeater shoulder drill off to the side with a portion of an old hand plane. A white pale sat towards the one corner and sticking awkwardly in the center of cluttered parts and pieces was a nice old handsaw! I pulled the old lovely out for a look, a ton of caked rust and paint decorated the years of the blade. It had good teeth but was slightly warped, just like me….lmao. Nonetheless I loved it and envisioned in my minds eye of what a good cleaning session could make it look like again.

Here are some photos of the saw before and after:










Topper sat inside the edge of the barn upon his riding mower like a jolly Santa Clause in a junk pile…saying "Take it, I ain't gonna use it."

I was truly like a kid in a country hardware store with all of these fantastic treats that I could clean and possibly use again! Saw sets large and small, a great compadre to my latest saw vice purchase! A shoulder plane, a leather punch, some additional aged jagged this and rusty ole that…the list kept growing!

As the list grew Topper continued "Take it, I ain't gonna use it." What a wonderful gift and I realized he saw the joy in my finds as I continued to contort myself around tractor tires and various boxes of parts searching like a kid on Christmas morning for more toys.

My beautiful girlfriend laughed with her Dad seeing just how much of a goof I was over a pile of things most would be relieved to chuck into the dumpster…hey we all have our own song to sing and mine has melodies of sweet woodcraft and planed pine shavings for all…lol.

Here are a few pics of what I was able to salvage with this hand saw. It is Warranted Superior medallion Dec 27, 1887. It will require some light anvil work to attempt to straighten the blade out more, as well as a nice sharpening that my newly purchased saw vice can provide. If it cannot be used it can remain a wonderful time piece to hang in my shop and enjoy. I really cherish these old tools as most of them were Topper's father's. His dad was a carpenter and some of these very same tools may have been handed down to Topper's Dad from his Grandfather, pretty neat stuff indeed.

It is important to keep these old tools and their owners legacy alive. With caring and a little cleaning we can once again share their history, see their tool marked stories on parts of their beaten bodies of hard work from a past time.

As you drive around some old country roads you never know and it is sure fun to think, what may lie inside some old barn. As the summer high pines stand tall and the waters flow true and strong there can always be old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

The tools as always were only an added bonus for it was the quality of the company that made the entire time a real blast. Perhaps the real favorite of it all was remembering to snap a picture of me and Topper.

It reminds me of a fun moment at lunch we shared. All 3 of us were at the China Buffet…of course…lol. At the end of our pig out fest we in true tradition read our fortune cookies. Topper read his message and it went something like this "You are surrounded by people that care about you" Amen to that, and thank you Topper, your fortune was right on target.

Topper and me.



May all of your fortunes be as great and thank you for reading!

Joe
Thnx for lettin me ride along. Welcome back
 

· Registered
Joined
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter · #344 ·
Old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

Hello friends, I have been meaning to share some tales of a wonderful trip I took at the end of August to upstate NY. Finally I have the chance to get this story and the pictures uploaded. I hope you may enjoy this blog and I thank you for taking a moment and reading….here we go!..........

The road was a winding ride through the beautiful tall green trees of upstate NY. The mountains were a backdrop of a totally peaceful environment showing strength and inviting calm. Around this area the folks that live here operate at a much different pace and lifestyle. You can leave your barn/garage open and go out to the store and you'll come back and everything is still there…lol. Maybe we need to think about that…I guess that should not be such a funny statement should it? Where and how did we lose such an trusted faith in our fellow neighbors in most areas of this great country?

I found the people here very hard working, experienced, easy going but nobody's fool. Many grow up shooting a rifle, crossbow, using a knife, and somehow crime is extremely low in this area, perhaps another lesson for us to ponder in our increasing troubled times and gang growing youth.

It was a nice sunny day and me and my girlfriend were off to visit her dad Topper. My past blog work has included Topper, he's a very interesting character.

To my lucky surprise just at the beginning of a 2 minute ride up the hill to Topper's house we found an older lady having an outside auction in her front yard. We pulled over and took a few minutes to look some things over….no worries, old hand tools appeared! There were at least 8-9 old hollows and rounding planes but far out of whack and way too worn for my latest craving of old relics to tinker with. I rooted around in a bucket of about 15-20 various rusty files, screwdrivers and pieces of this and that although still nothing I could not live without.

Then…..she sat on the edge of the first of 3 tables, rusty, old, and calling my name….a saw vice!!!! Oh boy, was I quick to wrap my hands on that and begin to see what worked and what didn't. The wing nut was half broke off but the actual job of the tool seemed to vice up fine. I figured with some WD-40 to the rescue I could see positive things in using this piece, so I had to get a price for it! I approached the kind old lady and asked "Good afternoon, how much?" "Ten dollars" she replied. I was almost as quick as John Wayne in "The Shootist" drawing that ten dollar bill out of my wallet…lol. I recall past annoying ebay scenarios more than a few times and got tired of the endless bidding for one of these as the prices got so out of hand with the shipping.

But not today, this was a really nice vice and honestly a terrific price for something that worked!

With vice in hand we were onward and upward to Toppers!

I think the cool part of living your life is if you stick around long enough perhaps you may be blessed with meeting a few good and unforgettable people. I have been very lucky to meet some interesting and good folks in my short time. Topper is one of those people. I don't know anyone else like him, he's an outlaw of sorts, a teacher, a joker, a man of incredible instincts. He is not in any way a weekend warrior of hunting, fishing, or wood skills. Topper is a part of the woods and the woods are a part of him. Topper is one of the most respected deer hunters there is in that section of upstate NY.

So you can only imagine the knowledge of many things he shares within 5 minutes of just casual chatter at his kitchen table, take notes…there is a a lot of it..lol.

From the various plants, trees, animals, leaves, guns, knives, beer, deer, venison, poker…haaaa and his beloved China Buffett…lol, I never find spending some time with Topper ever to be boring. As you carry on forward with conversation you take notice of how Topper hears and sees everything, it is amazing his delicate senses to the sounds, although I suppose that is the many years of hunting that have provided him with that and many other skills.

After a well spent afternoon with us three taking a small hike and seeing the various trees, plants and portions of lakes we headed back to his house so I could …..look in his barn….oh yeah…the tool junky within ….took me over…haaaa, get ready friends and let the search begin!

The barn doors opened and that wonderful smell of old wood, engine oil and history rushed into my senses. It was dim inside but once my eyes adjusted the treasures unfolded. A bow saw….a real old school rusty bow saw. A few hickory handled axes in the corner next to his old blue tractor. An old wooden beat to hell tote with some rusty chains intertwined with some nice old drill braces, files, and a rugged small crow bar. A huge eggbeater shoulder drill off to the side with a portion of an old hand plane. A white pale sat towards the one corner and sticking awkwardly in the center of cluttered parts and pieces was a nice old handsaw! I pulled the old lovely out for a look, a ton of caked rust and paint decorated the years of the blade. It had good teeth but was slightly warped, just like me….lmao. Nonetheless I loved it and envisioned in my minds eye of what a good cleaning session could make it look like again.

Here are some photos of the saw before and after:










Topper sat inside the edge of the barn upon his riding mower like a jolly Santa Clause in a junk pile…saying "Take it, I ain't gonna use it."

I was truly like a kid in a country hardware store with all of these fantastic treats that I could clean and possibly use again! Saw sets large and small, a great compadre to my latest saw vice purchase! A shoulder plane, a leather punch, some additional aged jagged this and rusty ole that…the list kept growing!

As the list grew Topper continued "Take it, I ain't gonna use it." What a wonderful gift and I realized he saw the joy in my finds as I continued to contort myself around tractor tires and various boxes of parts searching like a kid on Christmas morning for more toys.

My beautiful girlfriend laughed with her Dad seeing just how much of a goof I was over a pile of things most would be relieved to chuck into the dumpster…hey we all have our own song to sing and mine has melodies of sweet woodcraft and planed pine shavings for all…lol.

Here are a few pics of what I was able to salvage with this hand saw. It is Warranted Superior medallion Dec 27, 1887. It will require some light anvil work to attempt to straighten the blade out more, as well as a nice sharpening that my newly purchased saw vice can provide. If it cannot be used it can remain a wonderful time piece to hang in my shop and enjoy. I really cherish these old tools as most of them were Topper's father's. His dad was a carpenter and some of these very same tools may have been handed down to Topper's Dad from his Grandfather, pretty neat stuff indeed.

It is important to keep these old tools and their owners legacy alive. With caring and a little cleaning we can once again share their history, see their tool marked stories on parts of their beaten bodies of hard work from a past time.

As you drive around some old country roads you never know and it is sure fun to think, what may lie inside some old barn. As the summer high pines stand tall and the waters flow true and strong there can always be old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

The tools as always were only an added bonus for it was the quality of the company that made the entire time a real blast. Perhaps the real favorite of it all was remembering to snap a picture of me and Topper.

It reminds me of a fun moment at lunch we shared. All 3 of us were at the China Buffet…of course…lol. At the end of our pig out fest we in true tradition read our fortune cookies. Topper read his message and it went something like this "You are surrounded by people that care about you" Amen to that, and thank you Topper, your fortune was right on target.

Topper and me.



May all of your fortunes be as great and thank you for reading!

Joe
Thank you friends! Great to see and read your comments.
 

· Registered
Joined
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10,033 Posts
Old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

Hello friends, I have been meaning to share some tales of a wonderful trip I took at the end of August to upstate NY. Finally I have the chance to get this story and the pictures uploaded. I hope you may enjoy this blog and I thank you for taking a moment and reading….here we go!..........

The road was a winding ride through the beautiful tall green trees of upstate NY. The mountains were a backdrop of a totally peaceful environment showing strength and inviting calm. Around this area the folks that live here operate at a much different pace and lifestyle. You can leave your barn/garage open and go out to the store and you'll come back and everything is still there…lol. Maybe we need to think about that…I guess that should not be such a funny statement should it? Where and how did we lose such an trusted faith in our fellow neighbors in most areas of this great country?

I found the people here very hard working, experienced, easy going but nobody's fool. Many grow up shooting a rifle, crossbow, using a knife, and somehow crime is extremely low in this area, perhaps another lesson for us to ponder in our increasing troubled times and gang growing youth.

It was a nice sunny day and me and my girlfriend were off to visit her dad Topper. My past blog work has included Topper, he's a very interesting character.

To my lucky surprise just at the beginning of a 2 minute ride up the hill to Topper's house we found an older lady having an outside auction in her front yard. We pulled over and took a few minutes to look some things over….no worries, old hand tools appeared! There were at least 8-9 old hollows and rounding planes but far out of whack and way too worn for my latest craving of old relics to tinker with. I rooted around in a bucket of about 15-20 various rusty files, screwdrivers and pieces of this and that although still nothing I could not live without.

Then…..she sat on the edge of the first of 3 tables, rusty, old, and calling my name….a saw vice!!!! Oh boy, was I quick to wrap my hands on that and begin to see what worked and what didn't. The wing nut was half broke off but the actual job of the tool seemed to vice up fine. I figured with some WD-40 to the rescue I could see positive things in using this piece, so I had to get a price for it! I approached the kind old lady and asked "Good afternoon, how much?" "Ten dollars" she replied. I was almost as quick as John Wayne in "The Shootist" drawing that ten dollar bill out of my wallet…lol. I recall past annoying ebay scenarios more than a few times and got tired of the endless bidding for one of these as the prices got so out of hand with the shipping.

But not today, this was a really nice vice and honestly a terrific price for something that worked!

With vice in hand we were onward and upward to Toppers!

I think the cool part of living your life is if you stick around long enough perhaps you may be blessed with meeting a few good and unforgettable people. I have been very lucky to meet some interesting and good folks in my short time. Topper is one of those people. I don't know anyone else like him, he's an outlaw of sorts, a teacher, a joker, a man of incredible instincts. He is not in any way a weekend warrior of hunting, fishing, or wood skills. Topper is a part of the woods and the woods are a part of him. Topper is one of the most respected deer hunters there is in that section of upstate NY.

So you can only imagine the knowledge of many things he shares within 5 minutes of just casual chatter at his kitchen table, take notes…there is a a lot of it..lol.

From the various plants, trees, animals, leaves, guns, knives, beer, deer, venison, poker…haaaa and his beloved China Buffett…lol, I never find spending some time with Topper ever to be boring. As you carry on forward with conversation you take notice of how Topper hears and sees everything, it is amazing his delicate senses to the sounds, although I suppose that is the many years of hunting that have provided him with that and many other skills.

After a well spent afternoon with us three taking a small hike and seeing the various trees, plants and portions of lakes we headed back to his house so I could …..look in his barn….oh yeah…the tool junky within ….took me over…haaaa, get ready friends and let the search begin!

The barn doors opened and that wonderful smell of old wood, engine oil and history rushed into my senses. It was dim inside but once my eyes adjusted the treasures unfolded. A bow saw….a real old school rusty bow saw. A few hickory handled axes in the corner next to his old blue tractor. An old wooden beat to hell tote with some rusty chains intertwined with some nice old drill braces, files, and a rugged small crow bar. A huge eggbeater shoulder drill off to the side with a portion of an old hand plane. A white pale sat towards the one corner and sticking awkwardly in the center of cluttered parts and pieces was a nice old handsaw! I pulled the old lovely out for a look, a ton of caked rust and paint decorated the years of the blade. It had good teeth but was slightly warped, just like me….lmao. Nonetheless I loved it and envisioned in my minds eye of what a good cleaning session could make it look like again.

Here are some photos of the saw before and after:










Topper sat inside the edge of the barn upon his riding mower like a jolly Santa Clause in a junk pile…saying "Take it, I ain't gonna use it."

I was truly like a kid in a country hardware store with all of these fantastic treats that I could clean and possibly use again! Saw sets large and small, a great compadre to my latest saw vice purchase! A shoulder plane, a leather punch, some additional aged jagged this and rusty ole that…the list kept growing!

As the list grew Topper continued "Take it, I ain't gonna use it." What a wonderful gift and I realized he saw the joy in my finds as I continued to contort myself around tractor tires and various boxes of parts searching like a kid on Christmas morning for more toys.

My beautiful girlfriend laughed with her Dad seeing just how much of a goof I was over a pile of things most would be relieved to chuck into the dumpster…hey we all have our own song to sing and mine has melodies of sweet woodcraft and planed pine shavings for all…lol.

Here are a few pics of what I was able to salvage with this hand saw. It is Warranted Superior medallion Dec 27, 1887. It will require some light anvil work to attempt to straighten the blade out more, as well as a nice sharpening that my newly purchased saw vice can provide. If it cannot be used it can remain a wonderful time piece to hang in my shop and enjoy. I really cherish these old tools as most of them were Topper's father's. His dad was a carpenter and some of these very same tools may have been handed down to Topper's Dad from his Grandfather, pretty neat stuff indeed.

It is important to keep these old tools and their owners legacy alive. With caring and a little cleaning we can once again share their history, see their tool marked stories on parts of their beaten bodies of hard work from a past time.

As you drive around some old country roads you never know and it is sure fun to think, what may lie inside some old barn. As the summer high pines stand tall and the waters flow true and strong there can always be old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

The tools as always were only an added bonus for it was the quality of the company that made the entire time a real blast. Perhaps the real favorite of it all was remembering to snap a picture of me and Topper.

It reminds me of a fun moment at lunch we shared. All 3 of us were at the China Buffet…of course…lol. At the end of our pig out fest we in true tradition read our fortune cookies. Topper read his message and it went something like this "You are surrounded by people that care about you" Amen to that, and thank you Topper, your fortune was right on target.

Topper and me.



May all of your fortunes be as great and thank you for reading!

Joe
Great story and a great saw too.
You the man.
 

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Old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

Hello friends, I have been meaning to share some tales of a wonderful trip I took at the end of August to upstate NY. Finally I have the chance to get this story and the pictures uploaded. I hope you may enjoy this blog and I thank you for taking a moment and reading….here we go!..........

The road was a winding ride through the beautiful tall green trees of upstate NY. The mountains were a backdrop of a totally peaceful environment showing strength and inviting calm. Around this area the folks that live here operate at a much different pace and lifestyle. You can leave your barn/garage open and go out to the store and you'll come back and everything is still there…lol. Maybe we need to think about that…I guess that should not be such a funny statement should it? Where and how did we lose such an trusted faith in our fellow neighbors in most areas of this great country?

I found the people here very hard working, experienced, easy going but nobody's fool. Many grow up shooting a rifle, crossbow, using a knife, and somehow crime is extremely low in this area, perhaps another lesson for us to ponder in our increasing troubled times and gang growing youth.

It was a nice sunny day and me and my girlfriend were off to visit her dad Topper. My past blog work has included Topper, he's a very interesting character.

To my lucky surprise just at the beginning of a 2 minute ride up the hill to Topper's house we found an older lady having an outside auction in her front yard. We pulled over and took a few minutes to look some things over….no worries, old hand tools appeared! There were at least 8-9 old hollows and rounding planes but far out of whack and way too worn for my latest craving of old relics to tinker with. I rooted around in a bucket of about 15-20 various rusty files, screwdrivers and pieces of this and that although still nothing I could not live without.

Then…..she sat on the edge of the first of 3 tables, rusty, old, and calling my name….a saw vice!!!! Oh boy, was I quick to wrap my hands on that and begin to see what worked and what didn't. The wing nut was half broke off but the actual job of the tool seemed to vice up fine. I figured with some WD-40 to the rescue I could see positive things in using this piece, so I had to get a price for it! I approached the kind old lady and asked "Good afternoon, how much?" "Ten dollars" she replied. I was almost as quick as John Wayne in "The Shootist" drawing that ten dollar bill out of my wallet…lol. I recall past annoying ebay scenarios more than a few times and got tired of the endless bidding for one of these as the prices got so out of hand with the shipping.

But not today, this was a really nice vice and honestly a terrific price for something that worked!

With vice in hand we were onward and upward to Toppers!

I think the cool part of living your life is if you stick around long enough perhaps you may be blessed with meeting a few good and unforgettable people. I have been very lucky to meet some interesting and good folks in my short time. Topper is one of those people. I don't know anyone else like him, he's an outlaw of sorts, a teacher, a joker, a man of incredible instincts. He is not in any way a weekend warrior of hunting, fishing, or wood skills. Topper is a part of the woods and the woods are a part of him. Topper is one of the most respected deer hunters there is in that section of upstate NY.

So you can only imagine the knowledge of many things he shares within 5 minutes of just casual chatter at his kitchen table, take notes…there is a a lot of it..lol.

From the various plants, trees, animals, leaves, guns, knives, beer, deer, venison, poker…haaaa and his beloved China Buffett…lol, I never find spending some time with Topper ever to be boring. As you carry on forward with conversation you take notice of how Topper hears and sees everything, it is amazing his delicate senses to the sounds, although I suppose that is the many years of hunting that have provided him with that and many other skills.

After a well spent afternoon with us three taking a small hike and seeing the various trees, plants and portions of lakes we headed back to his house so I could …..look in his barn….oh yeah…the tool junky within ….took me over…haaaa, get ready friends and let the search begin!

The barn doors opened and that wonderful smell of old wood, engine oil and history rushed into my senses. It was dim inside but once my eyes adjusted the treasures unfolded. A bow saw….a real old school rusty bow saw. A few hickory handled axes in the corner next to his old blue tractor. An old wooden beat to hell tote with some rusty chains intertwined with some nice old drill braces, files, and a rugged small crow bar. A huge eggbeater shoulder drill off to the side with a portion of an old hand plane. A white pale sat towards the one corner and sticking awkwardly in the center of cluttered parts and pieces was a nice old handsaw! I pulled the old lovely out for a look, a ton of caked rust and paint decorated the years of the blade. It had good teeth but was slightly warped, just like me….lmao. Nonetheless I loved it and envisioned in my minds eye of what a good cleaning session could make it look like again.

Here are some photos of the saw before and after:










Topper sat inside the edge of the barn upon his riding mower like a jolly Santa Clause in a junk pile…saying "Take it, I ain't gonna use it."

I was truly like a kid in a country hardware store with all of these fantastic treats that I could clean and possibly use again! Saw sets large and small, a great compadre to my latest saw vice purchase! A shoulder plane, a leather punch, some additional aged jagged this and rusty ole that…the list kept growing!

As the list grew Topper continued "Take it, I ain't gonna use it." What a wonderful gift and I realized he saw the joy in my finds as I continued to contort myself around tractor tires and various boxes of parts searching like a kid on Christmas morning for more toys.

My beautiful girlfriend laughed with her Dad seeing just how much of a goof I was over a pile of things most would be relieved to chuck into the dumpster…hey we all have our own song to sing and mine has melodies of sweet woodcraft and planed pine shavings for all…lol.

Here are a few pics of what I was able to salvage with this hand saw. It is Warranted Superior medallion Dec 27, 1887. It will require some light anvil work to attempt to straighten the blade out more, as well as a nice sharpening that my newly purchased saw vice can provide. If it cannot be used it can remain a wonderful time piece to hang in my shop and enjoy. I really cherish these old tools as most of them were Topper's father's. His dad was a carpenter and some of these very same tools may have been handed down to Topper's Dad from his Grandfather, pretty neat stuff indeed.

It is important to keep these old tools and their owners legacy alive. With caring and a little cleaning we can once again share their history, see their tool marked stories on parts of their beaten bodies of hard work from a past time.

As you drive around some old country roads you never know and it is sure fun to think, what may lie inside some old barn. As the summer high pines stand tall and the waters flow true and strong there can always be old treasures, green mountains and great fortunes.

The tools as always were only an added bonus for it was the quality of the company that made the entire time a real blast. Perhaps the real favorite of it all was remembering to snap a picture of me and Topper.

It reminds me of a fun moment at lunch we shared. All 3 of us were at the China Buffet…of course…lol. At the end of our pig out fest we in true tradition read our fortune cookies. Topper read his message and it went something like this "You are surrounded by people that care about you" Amen to that, and thank you Topper, your fortune was right on target.

Topper and me.



May all of your fortunes be as great and thank you for reading!

Joe
Nice tour Joe,
And a wonderful restore.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Discussion Starter · #347 ·
A book worth more than just shavings

What book is that? Oh, it is the rereleased printing of Wille Sundqvist's "Swedish Carving Techniques"

For a few years now this fine book has become a sort of cult classic and being that this book was out of print the powers that be that did have it for sale were sure to put a hefty price tag on it. I have seen copies in various condition ranging anywhere from $150-$500…..yeah…..It pays to wait.

Finally about 8 months or so back this book by popular demand was rereleased and just recently last month I finally got around to getting a copy for myself. Some of you may have this book, many probably do not. If you do, I hope your knowledge and joy of the subjects in this text may have made your life a little bit better. I can say for myself this book is worth more than just shavings.

I find this book to be a friendly companion to anyone that needs to take a break from the maddening routines of the modern world and all of it's high tech clutter. This book is also a great break for those woodworkers that make production pieces and are getting burnt out from the daily grind of doing that.

This book to me is a simple text with amazing complexity, pride and care that reminds us of many lost skills that are valuable to everyone in one way or another. Each chapter contains wonderful lessons. Wille explains the care and craftsmanship of creating a ladle, spoon, bowl, or wooden buttons, all the way to correctly sharpening a pencil with your sloyd knife.

The chapters are all about care and having pride for your various crafts. I found the subject of using sandpaper very helpful and interesting. It has a spirit of the wilderness while embracing natural shapes and elements to see what we can use timber for in our own daily lives.

I would say it celebrates the tree and traditional tools as well as plugging into some electrical aspects of your shop ranging from the use of a bandsaw or lathe.

Personally I think if you never have carved before or simply do not care too carve at all that this book still contains some wonderful views on the subject of carrying on traditions for us and the future of our youth to explore.

Sadly I am reminded by reading this book that many of our current youth are lost. They lack proper mentoring and would benefit greatly from learning a craft. Bells, whistles, icons and phone apps should not be the only breakfast, lunch and dinner for our society to gulp down and drone forward on mindlessly and empty. Kids need something more personal that will install pride and discipline within themselves that they can carry with them throughout life. Although I would also agree that many of us adults could benefit from these solid principles as well.

I am glad to say that this book can now be purchased through country workshops as well as other outlets for a very decent price of $25.00. You may find this link helpful if you have the interest: http://www.countryworkshops.org/books.html

Just recently made my first butter paddle, another lesson in one of the books chapters. It was a real blast to give it a try and see new shapes and be challenged by them. If you care too, please stop by my latest project and check it out along with 2 new spoons. All done in Cherry!

I hope this may inspire some or even one of you to sharpen your hatchet, get a yourself a handy, sharp knife and spend an hour or few outside along a tree or in your shop. Life is full of wonderful, free and natural gifts that we take so much for granted.

Enjoy every shaving, and be well!

Joe
 

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154 Posts
A book worth more than just shavings

What book is that? Oh, it is the rereleased printing of Wille Sundqvist's "Swedish Carving Techniques"

For a few years now this fine book has become a sort of cult classic and being that this book was out of print the powers that be that did have it for sale were sure to put a hefty price tag on it. I have seen copies in various condition ranging anywhere from $150-$500…..yeah…..It pays to wait.

Finally about 8 months or so back this book by popular demand was rereleased and just recently last month I finally got around to getting a copy for myself. Some of you may have this book, many probably do not. If you do, I hope your knowledge and joy of the subjects in this text may have made your life a little bit better. I can say for myself this book is worth more than just shavings.

I find this book to be a friendly companion to anyone that needs to take a break from the maddening routines of the modern world and all of it's high tech clutter. This book is also a great break for those woodworkers that make production pieces and are getting burnt out from the daily grind of doing that.

This book to me is a simple text with amazing complexity, pride and care that reminds us of many lost skills that are valuable to everyone in one way or another. Each chapter contains wonderful lessons. Wille explains the care and craftsmanship of creating a ladle, spoon, bowl, or wooden buttons, all the way to correctly sharpening a pencil with your sloyd knife.

The chapters are all about care and having pride for your various crafts. I found the subject of using sandpaper very helpful and interesting. It has a spirit of the wilderness while embracing natural shapes and elements to see what we can use timber for in our own daily lives.

I would say it celebrates the tree and traditional tools as well as plugging into some electrical aspects of your shop ranging from the use of a bandsaw or lathe.

Personally I think if you never have carved before or simply do not care too carve at all that this book still contains some wonderful views on the subject of carrying on traditions for us and the future of our youth to explore.

Sadly I am reminded by reading this book that many of our current youth are lost. They lack proper mentoring and would benefit greatly from learning a craft. Bells, whistles, icons and phone apps should not be the only breakfast, lunch and dinner for our society to gulp down and drone forward on mindlessly and empty. Kids need something more personal that will install pride and discipline within themselves that they can carry with them throughout life. Although I would also agree that many of us adults could benefit from these solid principles as well.

I am glad to say that this book can now be purchased through country workshops as well as other outlets for a very decent price of $25.00. You may find this link helpful if you have the interest: http://www.countryworkshops.org/books.html

Just recently made my first butter paddle, another lesson in one of the books chapters. It was a real blast to give it a try and see new shapes and be challenged by them. If you care too, please stop by my latest project and check it out along with 2 new spoons. All done in Cherry!

I hope this may inspire some or even one of you to sharpen your hatchet, get a yourself a handy, sharp knife and spend an hour or few outside along a tree or in your shop. Life is full of wonderful, free and natural gifts that we take so much for granted.

Enjoy every shaving, and be well!

Joe
Hi Joe,
I have ordered this book last week and I should get it soon. Looking forward to reading it.
 

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A book worth more than just shavings

What book is that? Oh, it is the rereleased printing of Wille Sundqvist's "Swedish Carving Techniques"

For a few years now this fine book has become a sort of cult classic and being that this book was out of print the powers that be that did have it for sale were sure to put a hefty price tag on it. I have seen copies in various condition ranging anywhere from $150-$500…..yeah…..It pays to wait.

Finally about 8 months or so back this book by popular demand was rereleased and just recently last month I finally got around to getting a copy for myself. Some of you may have this book, many probably do not. If you do, I hope your knowledge and joy of the subjects in this text may have made your life a little bit better. I can say for myself this book is worth more than just shavings.

I find this book to be a friendly companion to anyone that needs to take a break from the maddening routines of the modern world and all of it's high tech clutter. This book is also a great break for those woodworkers that make production pieces and are getting burnt out from the daily grind of doing that.

This book to me is a simple text with amazing complexity, pride and care that reminds us of many lost skills that are valuable to everyone in one way or another. Each chapter contains wonderful lessons. Wille explains the care and craftsmanship of creating a ladle, spoon, bowl, or wooden buttons, all the way to correctly sharpening a pencil with your sloyd knife.

The chapters are all about care and having pride for your various crafts. I found the subject of using sandpaper very helpful and interesting. It has a spirit of the wilderness while embracing natural shapes and elements to see what we can use timber for in our own daily lives.

I would say it celebrates the tree and traditional tools as well as plugging into some electrical aspects of your shop ranging from the use of a bandsaw or lathe.

Personally I think if you never have carved before or simply do not care too carve at all that this book still contains some wonderful views on the subject of carrying on traditions for us and the future of our youth to explore.

Sadly I am reminded by reading this book that many of our current youth are lost. They lack proper mentoring and would benefit greatly from learning a craft. Bells, whistles, icons and phone apps should not be the only breakfast, lunch and dinner for our society to gulp down and drone forward on mindlessly and empty. Kids need something more personal that will install pride and discipline within themselves that they can carry with them throughout life. Although I would also agree that many of us adults could benefit from these solid principles as well.

I am glad to say that this book can now be purchased through country workshops as well as other outlets for a very decent price of $25.00. You may find this link helpful if you have the interest: http://www.countryworkshops.org/books.html

Just recently made my first butter paddle, another lesson in one of the books chapters. It was a real blast to give it a try and see new shapes and be challenged by them. If you care too, please stop by my latest project and check it out along with 2 new spoons. All done in Cherry!

I hope this may inspire some or even one of you to sharpen your hatchet, get a yourself a handy, sharp knife and spend an hour or few outside along a tree or in your shop. Life is full of wonderful, free and natural gifts that we take so much for granted.

Enjoy every shaving, and be well!

Joe
Thank ya Joe.
 

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Joined
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10,033 Posts
A book worth more than just shavings

What book is that? Oh, it is the rereleased printing of Wille Sundqvist's "Swedish Carving Techniques"

For a few years now this fine book has become a sort of cult classic and being that this book was out of print the powers that be that did have it for sale were sure to put a hefty price tag on it. I have seen copies in various condition ranging anywhere from $150-$500…..yeah…..It pays to wait.

Finally about 8 months or so back this book by popular demand was rereleased and just recently last month I finally got around to getting a copy for myself. Some of you may have this book, many probably do not. If you do, I hope your knowledge and joy of the subjects in this text may have made your life a little bit better. I can say for myself this book is worth more than just shavings.

I find this book to be a friendly companion to anyone that needs to take a break from the maddening routines of the modern world and all of it's high tech clutter. This book is also a great break for those woodworkers that make production pieces and are getting burnt out from the daily grind of doing that.

This book to me is a simple text with amazing complexity, pride and care that reminds us of many lost skills that are valuable to everyone in one way or another. Each chapter contains wonderful lessons. Wille explains the care and craftsmanship of creating a ladle, spoon, bowl, or wooden buttons, all the way to correctly sharpening a pencil with your sloyd knife.

The chapters are all about care and having pride for your various crafts. I found the subject of using sandpaper very helpful and interesting. It has a spirit of the wilderness while embracing natural shapes and elements to see what we can use timber for in our own daily lives.

I would say it celebrates the tree and traditional tools as well as plugging into some electrical aspects of your shop ranging from the use of a bandsaw or lathe.

Personally I think if you never have carved before or simply do not care too carve at all that this book still contains some wonderful views on the subject of carrying on traditions for us and the future of our youth to explore.

Sadly I am reminded by reading this book that many of our current youth are lost. They lack proper mentoring and would benefit greatly from learning a craft. Bells, whistles, icons and phone apps should not be the only breakfast, lunch and dinner for our society to gulp down and drone forward on mindlessly and empty. Kids need something more personal that will install pride and discipline within themselves that they can carry with them throughout life. Although I would also agree that many of us adults could benefit from these solid principles as well.

I am glad to say that this book can now be purchased through country workshops as well as other outlets for a very decent price of $25.00. You may find this link helpful if you have the interest: http://www.countryworkshops.org/books.html

Just recently made my first butter paddle, another lesson in one of the books chapters. It was a real blast to give it a try and see new shapes and be challenged by them. If you care too, please stop by my latest project and check it out along with 2 new spoons. All done in Cherry!

I hope this may inspire some or even one of you to sharpen your hatchet, get a yourself a handy, sharp knife and spend an hour or few outside along a tree or in your shop. Life is full of wonderful, free and natural gifts that we take so much for granted.

Enjoy every shaving, and be well!

Joe
Joe i will have to check it out
 

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Joined
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6,114 Posts
A book worth more than just shavings

What book is that? Oh, it is the rereleased printing of Wille Sundqvist's "Swedish Carving Techniques"

For a few years now this fine book has become a sort of cult classic and being that this book was out of print the powers that be that did have it for sale were sure to put a hefty price tag on it. I have seen copies in various condition ranging anywhere from $150-$500…..yeah…..It pays to wait.

Finally about 8 months or so back this book by popular demand was rereleased and just recently last month I finally got around to getting a copy for myself. Some of you may have this book, many probably do not. If you do, I hope your knowledge and joy of the subjects in this text may have made your life a little bit better. I can say for myself this book is worth more than just shavings.

I find this book to be a friendly companion to anyone that needs to take a break from the maddening routines of the modern world and all of it's high tech clutter. This book is also a great break for those woodworkers that make production pieces and are getting burnt out from the daily grind of doing that.

This book to me is a simple text with amazing complexity, pride and care that reminds us of many lost skills that are valuable to everyone in one way or another. Each chapter contains wonderful lessons. Wille explains the care and craftsmanship of creating a ladle, spoon, bowl, or wooden buttons, all the way to correctly sharpening a pencil with your sloyd knife.

The chapters are all about care and having pride for your various crafts. I found the subject of using sandpaper very helpful and interesting. It has a spirit of the wilderness while embracing natural shapes and elements to see what we can use timber for in our own daily lives.

I would say it celebrates the tree and traditional tools as well as plugging into some electrical aspects of your shop ranging from the use of a bandsaw or lathe.

Personally I think if you never have carved before or simply do not care too carve at all that this book still contains some wonderful views on the subject of carrying on traditions for us and the future of our youth to explore.

Sadly I am reminded by reading this book that many of our current youth are lost. They lack proper mentoring and would benefit greatly from learning a craft. Bells, whistles, icons and phone apps should not be the only breakfast, lunch and dinner for our society to gulp down and drone forward on mindlessly and empty. Kids need something more personal that will install pride and discipline within themselves that they can carry with them throughout life. Although I would also agree that many of us adults could benefit from these solid principles as well.

I am glad to say that this book can now be purchased through country workshops as well as other outlets for a very decent price of $25.00. You may find this link helpful if you have the interest: http://www.countryworkshops.org/books.html

Just recently made my first butter paddle, another lesson in one of the books chapters. It was a real blast to give it a try and see new shapes and be challenged by them. If you care too, please stop by my latest project and check it out along with 2 new spoons. All done in Cherry!

I hope this may inspire some or even one of you to sharpen your hatchet, get a yourself a handy, sharp knife and spend an hour or few outside along a tree or in your shop. Life is full of wonderful, free and natural gifts that we take so much for granted.

Enjoy every shaving, and be well!

Joe
Thank you for the review, I will look into this.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Joined
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Discussion Starter · #352 ·
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
 

· Registered
Joined
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32 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
Agree on the Rant and Nice job on dressing up the hinges…...
 

· Registered
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4,464 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
While things such as pride in ones work, craftsmanship, and traditional values are taking a pummeling at the hands of corporate sponsored popular culture, all is not lost. I have met many young people here, and in person doing volunteer work for my church to know that the love of craft is far from dead. And while anyone that knows me in person knows the only reason I would ever hug a tree is either I have had a few too many beers, or I am trying to figure out how many board feet are in that thing… But I must say that if our society is going to be sustainable, then durable craftsmanship will be the way to go forward instead of the disposable society that has been built up… And honestly, something I figured out a long time ago, if you want it done right, and you have the ability to, you had better do it yourself. Nobody else cares as much about the quality of your things as you do…

By the way, I really like the way you dressed up that hinge. I hope you don't mind if I borrow your idea…
 

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1,517 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
Joe what a great hinge uplift, can I borrow the idea :)
I've a collection of old style slotted screws as well could be a nice
combo.
Joe I'm fortunate enough that both my family and friends don't get
caught in hype thankfully. My customers buy into my values. I stand by
my products and don't discard wood with a minor flaw. Today I did a run
of 100 plus of one product. I'm pleased to say there are no two the same.
A friend popped in for a blether (chat) and ended up shaping some parts, his
radiuses are different from mine. I could jig more I could go the CNC route, I'm
choosing the wonderful warm human element.Be well my friend.

Jamie
 

· Registered
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181 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
Check out Popular Mechanics on google books. The issues from the 50s shows that. I like the look of the hinges.
 

· Registered
Joined
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1,332 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
Quality rant anD nice hinges.
 

· Banned
Joined
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2,577 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
You hit the nail on the head with your quality/craftsmanship and pride thoughts. One of the main and important reasons I really like going to and participating in craft and art shows is that it is a community of creative people that take tremendous pride in their creativity and work…and many of the people who visit are those who appreciate what we do.

Nice hinges…
 

· In Loving Memory
Joined
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8,391 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
I like the hinge idea. It came out great. As for society being what it is, follow your own star and try to get others interested in making stuff. Most folks aren't that interested in creative pastimes, but then we need them to say wow! when they see our projects.
 

· Registered
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9,607 Posts
Resurrecting craft in a throw away society

Somehow things in our modern world have moved so fast that I think the craft, care and pride has become second to strictly making money off of dumbed down consumers. Tools, automobiles, furniture, so many things seem spit out of a robotic assembly line and tossed in our faces through constant visual media.

The machine of the marketing world I think at most depends on our stressed out, overworked lifestyles to cave in and just except modern junk. It attempts to pacify our weary minds with fast buttons on amped up hand held gadgets convincing us that the next fast and gratifying minute is worth forgetting our present moment. We continue to see jobs where souls once gave their hard earned hours now being taken over by computers, robots and people so desperate they are willing to work faster, cheaper, and keep the machine of big business selling us a lot of stuff.

We live in a throw away society. I feel sad that many of todays youth feel fine being ignorant of the simple pleasures of living in order to have more gigabytes to speed things up and push buttons to make things seem fantastic. We are slowly becoming hamsters spinning around without even realizing it.

The latest phrase that the marketing ignorant are selling our modern household is "I can be the hero" I think that stinks. I think of our veterans, young men and women today without limbs…our modern world of self entitlement needs a swift kick on it's backside and a fast dam humbling. Every time I see a WWII veteran I am in awe of them….they are hero's. I would not even have the right to type this if not for what they did. We are losing values I fear, so many of us focused on ourselves with plastic junk that we toss away.

Well, I need to share some good things now. I am not here to blog and bum everyone out..lol.

Life is what we make it…so let's make something!

I had these rather rectangular and boring looking hinges that I will be using for a new tool box I have been working on.

I suppose my previous rant above was in my head looking at these cheap hinges. Sure they will do the job, but I thought…perhaps I can resurrect the craft in a throw away society….jazz these suckers up a little..lol.

Here is a before and after to get the idea of the original shape:



I set about my task with a Rats Tail file and Combo file to follow my new idea. I used my Grandfather's vise for the job. I tried a little Whitesmithing I suppose, it's alway fun to work metal. If you do so please try and wear a mask.


Now onto the new tool box I hope to unveil in the upcoming month. I like the curves and the bit of flow these hinges give off now. It felt good to take something and customize it, sort of add your stamp on it.


Well I surely know that my little hinge operation will not solve the worlds problems, but I do think it keeps my focus on some things that are important. We all have the great option to make things, to take media of any sort, paper, music, timber, metal, etc. and excuse ourselves from throw away mass produced junk.

No matter how well or how rough our creations become, they have soul, and I like to think they honor those that paved the way for us today. Make no mistake, it is a world of wonderful things. We have made amazing gains in many fields. My thoughts are that we all need to keep the course on the shore of fast waves and ever changing tides. Unlike our computers, there are no reboots in our lives, try to enjoy each moment.

Thanks for stopping by…and file those hinges!

I will always keep a sharp saw in the till for ya,

Joe
Nice work Joe.
 
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