LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pickup and Carry Down

Picked up a 5HP Powermatic 66 and a Rockwell Unisaw (with vintage Biesemeyer fences) last weekend. I am keeping the Powermatic and will be restoring it.

Unisaw:

Electrical wiring Electric fan Automotive tire Gas Machine


Powermatic 66 (with a 65 Mustang)

Wood Gas Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain


I stripped the 66 down and carried the components down into my basement. I was a pain-in-the-... getting the cabinet down. Luckily I have a exterior cement staircase and a good hand truck.

Motor vehicle Gas Automotive exterior Machine Wood


Wood Flooring Floor Rectangle Automotive exterior


The Powermatic has what looks like a fairly new 3 phase Baldor motor in it. It cant be more than a year old. I am looking to replace it with a single phase motor.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Pickup and Carry Down

Picked up a 5HP Powermatic 66 and a Rockwell Unisaw (with vintage Biesemeyer fences) last weekend. I am keeping the Powermatic and will be restoring it.

Unisaw:

Electrical wiring Electric fan Automotive tire Gas Machine


Powermatic 66 (with a 65 Mustang)

Wood Gas Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain


I stripped the 66 down and carried the components down into my basement. I was a pain-in-the-... getting the cabinet down. Luckily I have a exterior cement staircase and a good hand truck.

Motor vehicle Gas Automotive exterior Machine Wood


Wood Flooring Floor Rectangle Automotive exterior


The Powermatic has what looks like a fairly new 3 phase Baldor motor in it. It cant be more than a year old. I am looking to replace it with a single phase motor.
Nice Haul!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,871 Posts
Pickup and Carry Down

Picked up a 5HP Powermatic 66 and a Rockwell Unisaw (with vintage Biesemeyer fences) last weekend. I am keeping the Powermatic and will be restoring it.

Unisaw:

Electrical wiring Electric fan Automotive tire Gas Machine


Powermatic 66 (with a 65 Mustang)

Wood Gas Automotive exterior Hardwood Wood stain


I stripped the 66 down and carried the components down into my basement. I was a pain-in-the-... getting the cabinet down. Luckily I have a exterior cement staircase and a good hand truck.

Motor vehicle Gas Automotive exterior Machine Wood


Wood Flooring Floor Rectangle Automotive exterior


The Powermatic has what looks like a fairly new 3 phase Baldor motor in it. It cant be more than a year old. I am looking to replace it with a single phase motor.
Amen. Good score. It'll be fun watching you breathe new life into these !
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Strip, Prime, Paint

This weekend I decided to strip the Powermatic 66 and the 2 Beisemeyer fence systems and prime and paint them. I was hoping to keep the stripes on the saw, but the decals were tool badly damaged and I do not have the time to paint new ones on. I also was not able to match the original color, but I came "close". (I keep telling myself, "It is a saw, not your 65 Mustang,")

I still need to finish up some of the paint on the edges of the top, mount the fence rails, attach the starter controls, polish the top, and then of course-get everything perfectly square and parallel.

I still have not painted the rectangular tube that the fence slides on. I sanded it down and polished it up that it almost looks like chrome.

Wood Gas Engineering Audio equipment Machine


Rectangle Gas Composite material Font Wood


Rectangle Wood Material property Paint Font


Automotive design Wood Motor vehicle Gas Engineering


Table Engineering Computer desk Gas Wood


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
Strip, Prime, Paint

This weekend I decided to strip the Powermatic 66 and the 2 Beisemeyer fence systems and prime and paint them. I was hoping to keep the stripes on the saw, but the decals were tool badly damaged and I do not have the time to paint new ones on. I also was not able to match the original color, but I came "close". (I keep telling myself, "It is a saw, not your 65 Mustang,")

I still need to finish up some of the paint on the edges of the top, mount the fence rails, attach the starter controls, polish the top, and then of course-get everything perfectly square and parallel.

I still have not painted the rectangular tube that the fence slides on. I sanded it down and polished it up that it almost looks like chrome.

Wood Gas Engineering Audio equipment Machine


Rectangle Gas Composite material Font Wood


Rectangle Wood Material property Paint Font


Automotive design Wood Motor vehicle Gas Engineering


Table Engineering Computer desk Gas Wood


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal
Looks good to me. I'll be around for the finish.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Strip, Prime, Paint

This weekend I decided to strip the Powermatic 66 and the 2 Beisemeyer fence systems and prime and paint them. I was hoping to keep the stripes on the saw, but the decals were tool badly damaged and I do not have the time to paint new ones on. I also was not able to match the original color, but I came "close". (I keep telling myself, "It is a saw, not your 65 Mustang,")

I still need to finish up some of the paint on the edges of the top, mount the fence rails, attach the starter controls, polish the top, and then of course-get everything perfectly square and parallel.

I still have not painted the rectangular tube that the fence slides on. I sanded it down and polished it up that it almost looks like chrome.

Wood Gas Engineering Audio equipment Machine


Rectangle Gas Composite material Font Wood


Rectangle Wood Material property Paint Font


Automotive design Wood Motor vehicle Gas Engineering


Table Engineering Computer desk Gas Wood


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal
oh pretty
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
Strip, Prime, Paint

This weekend I decided to strip the Powermatic 66 and the 2 Beisemeyer fence systems and prime and paint them. I was hoping to keep the stripes on the saw, but the decals were tool badly damaged and I do not have the time to paint new ones on. I also was not able to match the original color, but I came "close". (I keep telling myself, "It is a saw, not your 65 Mustang,")

I still need to finish up some of the paint on the edges of the top, mount the fence rails, attach the starter controls, polish the top, and then of course-get everything perfectly square and parallel.

I still have not painted the rectangular tube that the fence slides on. I sanded it down and polished it up that it almost looks like chrome.

Wood Gas Engineering Audio equipment Machine


Rectangle Gas Composite material Font Wood


Rectangle Wood Material property Paint Font


Automotive design Wood Motor vehicle Gas Engineering


Table Engineering Computer desk Gas Wood


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal
it look better then new
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
863 Posts
Strip, Prime, Paint

This weekend I decided to strip the Powermatic 66 and the 2 Beisemeyer fence systems and prime and paint them. I was hoping to keep the stripes on the saw, but the decals were tool badly damaged and I do not have the time to paint new ones on. I also was not able to match the original color, but I came "close". (I keep telling myself, "It is a saw, not your 65 Mustang,")

I still need to finish up some of the paint on the edges of the top, mount the fence rails, attach the starter controls, polish the top, and then of course-get everything perfectly square and parallel.

I still have not painted the rectangular tube that the fence slides on. I sanded it down and polished it up that it almost looks like chrome.

Wood Gas Engineering Audio equipment Machine


Rectangle Gas Composite material Font Wood


Rectangle Wood Material property Paint Font


Automotive design Wood Motor vehicle Gas Engineering


Table Engineering Computer desk Gas Wood


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal
Looks great! What did you use to paint it? What are your plans with the Unisaw?
btw: i live on LI too..
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Strip, Prime, Paint

This weekend I decided to strip the Powermatic 66 and the 2 Beisemeyer fence systems and prime and paint them. I was hoping to keep the stripes on the saw, but the decals were tool badly damaged and I do not have the time to paint new ones on. I also was not able to match the original color, but I came "close". (I keep telling myself, "It is a saw, not your 65 Mustang,")

I still need to finish up some of the paint on the edges of the top, mount the fence rails, attach the starter controls, polish the top, and then of course-get everything perfectly square and parallel.

I still have not painted the rectangular tube that the fence slides on. I sanded it down and polished it up that it almost looks like chrome.

Wood Gas Engineering Audio equipment Machine


Rectangle Gas Composite material Font Wood


Rectangle Wood Material property Paint Font


Automotive design Wood Motor vehicle Gas Engineering


Table Engineering Computer desk Gas Wood


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal
Chuck: I used metallic gold Rust-oleum that I picked up at my HD. I was going to have the paint color matched at a body shop-but then i reminded myself that this is a saw (and as my dad pointed out to me last night, there are no "Classic Saw Shows". Although it would be really funny to see a Mecum style event with vintage power tools rolling up on stage.)

I am going to clean up the Unisaw and then sell it. The guy who sold it to me needed in out of his shop and practically gave it to me for less than its worth in scrap metal. I probably wont even need to clean it up to turn a profit on it.

And for LI: Whereabouts? You should join the Long Island Woodworkers Club. We meet once a month in Smithtown.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
863 Posts
Strip, Prime, Paint

This weekend I decided to strip the Powermatic 66 and the 2 Beisemeyer fence systems and prime and paint them. I was hoping to keep the stripes on the saw, but the decals were tool badly damaged and I do not have the time to paint new ones on. I also was not able to match the original color, but I came "close". (I keep telling myself, "It is a saw, not your 65 Mustang,")

I still need to finish up some of the paint on the edges of the top, mount the fence rails, attach the starter controls, polish the top, and then of course-get everything perfectly square and parallel.

I still have not painted the rectangular tube that the fence slides on. I sanded it down and polished it up that it almost looks like chrome.

Wood Gas Engineering Audio equipment Machine


Rectangle Gas Composite material Font Wood


Rectangle Wood Material property Paint Font


Automotive design Wood Motor vehicle Gas Engineering


Table Engineering Computer desk Gas Wood


Wood Gas Machine Engineering Metal
It came out great..
I live in Farmingdale. I spoke to a few guys in that club when I went to the woodworking show in Old Bethpage. I've been tempted to join, maybe one day I will…
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
On the Fence and Need Some Help

I spent a few hours last night disassembling the 2 Biesemeyer T-Squares and removing the laminated plywood faces. Besides a nasty splinter in my thumb, the process left me with a bigger problem: How to re-face the T-Squares.

I do not want to purchase the Beisemeyer replacement face. They are too expensive and there is just something fundamentally wrong with a woodworker paying 70 dollars for a 3×42 piece of laminated ply. I have come up with the following options, but am not sure which is the best choice:

  1. Laminated Plywood (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?, not sure which species)
  2. UHMW Polyethylene: I am not sure how flat this is and how to attach this to the T-Square body
  3. MDF or Laminated MDF (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?)
  4. Phenolic ??
  5. Something else ???

UHMW Polyethylene

I have a sheet of UHMW that I purchased and it is cupped, bowed and twisted. I was going to see if I could glue this somehow to a piece of MDF or Ply, but the gluing process seems a bit too complicated with this material. I was going to try screwing it from the backside, but because it is so warped, I do not think that this option would be good for a fence.

Laminating the Ply or MDF

Then for my choice of laminates, I was wondering if anyone has ever used Formica's Micro-dot laminate. It is the same one that Kreg uses on its router table. I also have no experience in laminating with anything other than wood, so I am not sure what else is out there.

I feel that I am in a good position to experiment here. I have 2 T-Squares for the saw, so I could implement 2 options and see which one I like. I could also build out one square as an auxiliary fence and make it so that I could easily attach jigs, guides and sacrificial fences to it.

If anyone has any experience with this, or could point me to some resources I would be very grateful for your help.

Now onto the next question: When I am done, do I get a Powermatic or a Biesemeyer decal for the top of the fence? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,123 Posts
On the Fence and Need Some Help

I spent a few hours last night disassembling the 2 Biesemeyer T-Squares and removing the laminated plywood faces. Besides a nasty splinter in my thumb, the process left me with a bigger problem: How to re-face the T-Squares.

I do not want to purchase the Beisemeyer replacement face. They are too expensive and there is just something fundamentally wrong with a woodworker paying 70 dollars for a 3×42 piece of laminated ply. I have come up with the following options, but am not sure which is the best choice:

  1. Laminated Plywood (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?, not sure which species)
  2. UHMW Polyethylene: I am not sure how flat this is and how to attach this to the T-Square body
  3. MDF or Laminated MDF (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?)
  4. Phenolic ??
  5. Something else ???

UHMW Polyethylene

I have a sheet of UHMW that I purchased and it is cupped, bowed and twisted. I was going to see if I could glue this somehow to a piece of MDF or Ply, but the gluing process seems a bit too complicated with this material. I was going to try screwing it from the backside, but because it is so warped, I do not think that this option would be good for a fence.

Laminating the Ply or MDF

Then for my choice of laminates, I was wondering if anyone has ever used Formica's Micro-dot laminate. It is the same one that Kreg uses on its router table. I also have no experience in laminating with anything other than wood, so I am not sure what else is out there.

I feel that I am in a good position to experiment here. I have 2 T-Squares for the saw, so I could implement 2 options and see which one I like. I could also build out one square as an auxiliary fence and make it so that I could easily attach jigs, guides and sacrificial fences to it.

If anyone has any experience with this, or could point me to some resources I would be very grateful for your help.

Now onto the next question: When I am done, do I get a Powermatic or a Biesemeyer decal for the top of the fence? :)
I have UHMW on one of my fences and it's straight, but ply I think would be better cuz you can make it higher and put a T-track in it. Heres a pic of it.
http://i855.photobucket.com/albums/ab120/icomba/bigdaddiesshoppics004.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
On the Fence and Need Some Help

I spent a few hours last night disassembling the 2 Biesemeyer T-Squares and removing the laminated plywood faces. Besides a nasty splinter in my thumb, the process left me with a bigger problem: How to re-face the T-Squares.

I do not want to purchase the Beisemeyer replacement face. They are too expensive and there is just something fundamentally wrong with a woodworker paying 70 dollars for a 3×42 piece of laminated ply. I have come up with the following options, but am not sure which is the best choice:

  1. Laminated Plywood (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?, not sure which species)
  2. UHMW Polyethylene: I am not sure how flat this is and how to attach this to the T-Square body
  3. MDF or Laminated MDF (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?)
  4. Phenolic ??
  5. Something else ???

UHMW Polyethylene

I have a sheet of UHMW that I purchased and it is cupped, bowed and twisted. I was going to see if I could glue this somehow to a piece of MDF or Ply, but the gluing process seems a bit too complicated with this material. I was going to try screwing it from the backside, but because it is so warped, I do not think that this option would be good for a fence.

Laminating the Ply or MDF

Then for my choice of laminates, I was wondering if anyone has ever used Formica's Micro-dot laminate. It is the same one that Kreg uses on its router table. I also have no experience in laminating with anything other than wood, so I am not sure what else is out there.

I feel that I am in a good position to experiment here. I have 2 T-Squares for the saw, so I could implement 2 options and see which one I like. I could also build out one square as an auxiliary fence and make it so that I could easily attach jigs, guides and sacrificial fences to it.

If anyone has any experience with this, or could point me to some resources I would be very grateful for your help.

Now onto the next question: When I am done, do I get a Powermatic or a Biesemeyer decal for the top of the fence? :)
I used ABS plastic, check out the pic in my projects page on table saw. There is a guy here in cleveland ohio on Craigslist, that sell ABS plastic Sheets. I use them for many jigs and such. Another thought is Old counter top material, laminate your own.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
903 Posts
On the Fence and Need Some Help

I spent a few hours last night disassembling the 2 Biesemeyer T-Squares and removing the laminated plywood faces. Besides a nasty splinter in my thumb, the process left me with a bigger problem: How to re-face the T-Squares.

I do not want to purchase the Beisemeyer replacement face. They are too expensive and there is just something fundamentally wrong with a woodworker paying 70 dollars for a 3×42 piece of laminated ply. I have come up with the following options, but am not sure which is the best choice:

  1. Laminated Plywood (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?, not sure which species)
  2. UHMW Polyethylene: I am not sure how flat this is and how to attach this to the T-Square body
  3. MDF or Laminated MDF (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?)
  4. Phenolic ??
  5. Something else ???

UHMW Polyethylene

I have a sheet of UHMW that I purchased and it is cupped, bowed and twisted. I was going to see if I could glue this somehow to a piece of MDF or Ply, but the gluing process seems a bit too complicated with this material. I was going to try screwing it from the backside, but because it is so warped, I do not think that this option would be good for a fence.

Laminating the Ply or MDF

Then for my choice of laminates, I was wondering if anyone has ever used Formica's Micro-dot laminate. It is the same one that Kreg uses on its router table. I also have no experience in laminating with anything other than wood, so I am not sure what else is out there.

I feel that I am in a good position to experiment here. I have 2 T-Squares for the saw, so I could implement 2 options and see which one I like. I could also build out one square as an auxiliary fence and make it so that I could easily attach jigs, guides and sacrificial fences to it.

If anyone has any experience with this, or could point me to some resources I would be very grateful for your help.

Now onto the next question: When I am done, do I get a Powermatic or a Biesemeyer decal for the top of the fence? :)
Hi Mike,
You know what looks cool is 1/2" Baltic birch plywood with Formica laminate. Slightly arch the exposed edges and varnish them. MDF has to be veneered on all sides, more weight and more work.

Don't T slots require 3/4" mat.? It sounds like a good idea but I've never needed this feature yet.
I guess if I was making the same cut on 500 ft. of wood, a feather board on top would be good. You could just clamp one on too.

It's a matter of personal preference in the end. You could make 2 and have both options.

It's a BEISEMEYER fence, and so a proper sticker would be the same. right?

"cupped, bowed and twisted".....nice firewood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
On the Fence and Need Some Help

I spent a few hours last night disassembling the 2 Biesemeyer T-Squares and removing the laminated plywood faces. Besides a nasty splinter in my thumb, the process left me with a bigger problem: How to re-face the T-Squares.

I do not want to purchase the Beisemeyer replacement face. They are too expensive and there is just something fundamentally wrong with a woodworker paying 70 dollars for a 3×42 piece of laminated ply. I have come up with the following options, but am not sure which is the best choice:

  1. Laminated Plywood (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?, not sure which species)
  2. UHMW Polyethylene: I am not sure how flat this is and how to attach this to the T-Square body
  3. MDF or Laminated MDF (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?)
  4. Phenolic ??
  5. Something else ???

UHMW Polyethylene

I have a sheet of UHMW that I purchased and it is cupped, bowed and twisted. I was going to see if I could glue this somehow to a piece of MDF or Ply, but the gluing process seems a bit too complicated with this material. I was going to try screwing it from the backside, but because it is so warped, I do not think that this option would be good for a fence.

Laminating the Ply or MDF

Then for my choice of laminates, I was wondering if anyone has ever used Formica's Micro-dot laminate. It is the same one that Kreg uses on its router table. I also have no experience in laminating with anything other than wood, so I am not sure what else is out there.

I feel that I am in a good position to experiment here. I have 2 T-Squares for the saw, so I could implement 2 options and see which one I like. I could also build out one square as an auxiliary fence and make it so that I could easily attach jigs, guides and sacrificial fences to it.

If anyone has any experience with this, or could point me to some resources I would be very grateful for your help.

Now onto the next question: When I am done, do I get a Powermatic or a Biesemeyer decal for the top of the fence? :)
Hi Mike
your best bet would be 1/2" phenolic plywood. this stuff is slick, is stable, and stays very flat.
it makes good jig and fence material, however it is hard to get a drill bit started in it because
it is so hard and slick. That uhmw is not alwas flat and is hard to shim, I found this out on my accu fence
powermatic's clone of the biesemeyer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
On the Fence and Need Some Help

I spent a few hours last night disassembling the 2 Biesemeyer T-Squares and removing the laminated plywood faces. Besides a nasty splinter in my thumb, the process left me with a bigger problem: How to re-face the T-Squares.

I do not want to purchase the Beisemeyer replacement face. They are too expensive and there is just something fundamentally wrong with a woodworker paying 70 dollars for a 3×42 piece of laminated ply. I have come up with the following options, but am not sure which is the best choice:

  1. Laminated Plywood (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?, not sure which species)
  2. UHMW Polyethylene: I am not sure how flat this is and how to attach this to the T-Square body
  3. MDF or Laminated MDF (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?)
  4. Phenolic ??
  5. Something else ???

UHMW Polyethylene

I have a sheet of UHMW that I purchased and it is cupped, bowed and twisted. I was going to see if I could glue this somehow to a piece of MDF or Ply, but the gluing process seems a bit too complicated with this material. I was going to try screwing it from the backside, but because it is so warped, I do not think that this option would be good for a fence.

Laminating the Ply or MDF

Then for my choice of laminates, I was wondering if anyone has ever used Formica's Micro-dot laminate. It is the same one that Kreg uses on its router table. I also have no experience in laminating with anything other than wood, so I am not sure what else is out there.

I feel that I am in a good position to experiment here. I have 2 T-Squares for the saw, so I could implement 2 options and see which one I like. I could also build out one square as an auxiliary fence and make it so that I could easily attach jigs, guides and sacrificial fences to it.

If anyone has any experience with this, or could point me to some resources I would be very grateful for your help.

Now onto the next question: When I am done, do I get a Powermatic or a Biesemeyer decal for the top of the fence? :)
I used laminated plywood with formica for mine .It has held up well and I also mounted a T -track on top. It seems very stable dimensionly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
On the Fence and Need Some Help

I spent a few hours last night disassembling the 2 Biesemeyer T-Squares and removing the laminated plywood faces. Besides a nasty splinter in my thumb, the process left me with a bigger problem: How to re-face the T-Squares.

I do not want to purchase the Beisemeyer replacement face. They are too expensive and there is just something fundamentally wrong with a woodworker paying 70 dollars for a 3×42 piece of laminated ply. I have come up with the following options, but am not sure which is the best choice:

  1. Laminated Plywood (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?, not sure which species)
  2. UHMW Polyethylene: I am not sure how flat this is and how to attach this to the T-Square body
  3. MDF or Laminated MDF (1/2 inch?, 3/4 inch?)
  4. Phenolic ??
  5. Something else ???

UHMW Polyethylene

I have a sheet of UHMW that I purchased and it is cupped, bowed and twisted. I was going to see if I could glue this somehow to a piece of MDF or Ply, but the gluing process seems a bit too complicated with this material. I was going to try screwing it from the backside, but because it is so warped, I do not think that this option would be good for a fence.

Laminating the Ply or MDF

Then for my choice of laminates, I was wondering if anyone has ever used Formica's Micro-dot laminate. It is the same one that Kreg uses on its router table. I also have no experience in laminating with anything other than wood, so I am not sure what else is out there.

I feel that I am in a good position to experiment here. I have 2 T-Squares for the saw, so I could implement 2 options and see which one I like. I could also build out one square as an auxiliary fence and make it so that I could easily attach jigs, guides and sacrificial fences to it.

If anyone has any experience with this, or could point me to some resources I would be very grateful for your help.

Now onto the next question: When I am done, do I get a Powermatic or a Biesemeyer decal for the top of the fence? :)
Thanks for all your tips. I am still not sure what I am going to do, but will be experimenting this weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Powering a 5HP Monster with Single Phase Power

So, just as I suspected, the 66 came with a fairly new 5 horse 3 phase Baldor motor. (Yeah Me!) I was able to figure this out by calling Baldor's customer service and reading them through the different numbers on the motor plate. As it turns out, the motor is only 2 years old. The saw is 22.

As many of you know from reading other posting on Lumberjocks, there are several options to consider when your shop simply has single phase power and your machinery requires 3 phase power. The first of these options is to replace your motor all together with a new (or used) single phase motor. Because the motor in my Powermatic was so new, and because it was 5 horsepower, I could not bring myself to replace it with a 3 horse motor. I could have replaced it with a single phase 5 horsepower motor, but because the cost is so high I would be better off buying a brand new saw. This being said, I opted to keep the saw and its motor and to figure out a way to power it with single phase current.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Many of you will ask: "Mike, why do you need a 5 horsepower table saw?" My answer: "I don't! It is just the principle of it."

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Now before I begin here, I must admit that I am a Computer Scientist, not an Electrical Engineer, so forgive me if I don't have all of the facts straight or 100% correct. I did my best over the past week to evaluate the options and to come to a decision that was right for me. What follows are some of my findings that led me to my decision.

If you would like to power a three phase motor off of a single phase power source, you have the following options:

  1. Static Phase Converter
  2. Rotary Phase Converter
  3. Variable Frequency Drive (or AC Drive)

Static Phase Converter

A static phase converter is a low cost method to power a 3 phase motor on a single phase power source. A static converter is essentially a "battery" that stores up electricity that is used to power the 3rd phase of the motor. Because it stores electrical energy, it can only deliver power for a short period of time, and thus is only used to get the electric motor turning. Once spinning, the "battery" is drained of its power and stops supplying power to the third phase. For this reason, if you choose to employ a static phase converter you will only be leveraging 2/3rds of the power of your motor.

A good way to view a static phase converter is to think of a human propelled merry-go-round in a park. Picture three adults standing around the merry go round while it is stationary; each adult represents a phase, where the third adult represents the phase supplied by the static converter. Now picture all three adults grabbing the bars of the ride and then spinning in. Once they get it going the third adult runs away to take care of something else and only two adults are left spinning the ride. This is essentially what happens when you use a static phase converter to "spin" your motor.

With this disadvantage you might wonder why someone would ever use a static converter. Price. A static phase converter is the most economical way to power a piece of equipment that requires three phase power where the operator is not concerned with horsepower loss. (Note: In recent years, Variable Frequency Drives have come down in price, making it less economically attractive to run static phase converters. We will learn about this more later.)

Rotary Phase Converter

A rotary phase converter (RPC) is essentially a 3 phase electric motor that is used to generate a third phase of electricity. You can think of it as an "electric powered electric generator". Rotary phase converters are great because when sized correctly, they allow you to power your equipment on 3 phase power with no horsepower loss.

So what is the down-side? Price. Because rotary phase converters often require a larger horsepower motor than the motor you are powering, they can get expensive. Additionally, rotary phase converters are very heavy (I almost bought a used 7.5 horsepower unit that weighed 270 pounds) they present a bit of a shipping challenge when you are buying them from a remotely located vendor (although I must admit, I found a couple of vendors who offered free shipping).

If you plan on purchasing or already have more than one machine that requires 3 phase power, a rotary phase converter might be a good option for you because, if sized correctly, you can run multiple machines off of a single RPC. You might not be able to start all of the machines simultaneously, but if that is your requirement you are most likely not a hobbyist.

Variable Frequency Drive

A variable frequency drive (VFD), or AC Drive, utilizes electronics to convert single phase power into three phase power and deliver this power to your motor with no power loss. VFDs control the frequency of the electricity that is being delivered to your motor, thus allowing you to soft start your motor and to precisely control the speed of your motor's rotation. With this also comes the ability to electrically stop your motor. Although you would probably not want your TS to stop spinning on a dime, you may choose to have the VFD stop the blade from spinning within 2 seconds of hitting the "Stop" control.

So what is the down-side? VFDs require a bit more skill to setup and program for your particular need. In addition, VFDs with single phase input can get pricey - especially when you are powering motors with horsepower ratings greater than 3.

VFDs also require that they are wired to the motor directly, so you will need to implement some sort of "On/Off" switch. Most VFDs have switches, but they are tiny buttons similar to the ones that are on a electronic thermostat. Now I don't know about you, but when I am balancing a sheet of ply and need to start my saw the last thing I want is a tiny "on" button. When the ply goes through the blade the last thing I want to do is to have to look for an "off" button.

My Choice Was…

After a dozen or so hours of searching online and calling vendors for both RPCs and VFDs, I decided to go with a VFD. I did find a 7.5 hp RPC in Manhattan on Craigslist that I talked the guy down to $500.00 for, but it was very large and I don't imagine that I will be buying much more 3 phase equipment.

I was able to get a VFD for $200.00 from an online retailer. I simply called them and explained my situation and told them what I was looking for. The salesman that I talked with was a great guy and gave me a great price on the unit.

My decision to use a VFD was based off of the following:

  1. Price: For me, a $200.00 VFD seemed very reasonable. (One alternative was to replace the motor with a single phase Leeson that I found new for $300.00 w/o shipping.)
  2. My Dad is an Electrician: Because my dad and a close family friend are electricians, my labor costs are basically nothing (well, maybe a Pizza). Because they are both master electricians (and my dad is also an Electrical Engineer), I can be sure that they will hookup the VFD correctly.
  3. I wanted to keep the existing motor. My dad keeps telling me "You want 3 phase for machines that big, trust me!"

So I hope whoever reads this finds it helpful. Again I am not an Electrical Engineer or an electrician so for those that are, please don't beat me up as to the validity of my comments (I know there are some exceptions to what I said above). Before you purchase any equipment, be sure you consult with whatever vendor for whatever solution you decide and make sure that your particular piece of machinery will work with their product. As a tip, have a picture of your motor plate handy to read to them over the phone, or as I did, to email to them.

And remember, if you are uncomfortable with electricity hire a professional.

Table Machine tool Wood Gas Tool
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
Powering a 5HP Monster with Single Phase Power

So, just as I suspected, the 66 came with a fairly new 5 horse 3 phase Baldor motor. (Yeah Me!) I was able to figure this out by calling Baldor's customer service and reading them through the different numbers on the motor plate. As it turns out, the motor is only 2 years old. The saw is 22.

As many of you know from reading other posting on Lumberjocks, there are several options to consider when your shop simply has single phase power and your machinery requires 3 phase power. The first of these options is to replace your motor all together with a new (or used) single phase motor. Because the motor in my Powermatic was so new, and because it was 5 horsepower, I could not bring myself to replace it with a 3 horse motor. I could have replaced it with a single phase 5 horsepower motor, but because the cost is so high I would be better off buying a brand new saw. This being said, I opted to keep the saw and its motor and to figure out a way to power it with single phase current.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Many of you will ask: "Mike, why do you need a 5 horsepower table saw?" My answer: "I don't! It is just the principle of it."

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Now before I begin here, I must admit that I am a Computer Scientist, not an Electrical Engineer, so forgive me if I don't have all of the facts straight or 100% correct. I did my best over the past week to evaluate the options and to come to a decision that was right for me. What follows are some of my findings that led me to my decision.

If you would like to power a three phase motor off of a single phase power source, you have the following options:

  1. Static Phase Converter
  2. Rotary Phase Converter
  3. Variable Frequency Drive (or AC Drive)

Static Phase Converter

A static phase converter is a low cost method to power a 3 phase motor on a single phase power source. A static converter is essentially a "battery" that stores up electricity that is used to power the 3rd phase of the motor. Because it stores electrical energy, it can only deliver power for a short period of time, and thus is only used to get the electric motor turning. Once spinning, the "battery" is drained of its power and stops supplying power to the third phase. For this reason, if you choose to employ a static phase converter you will only be leveraging 2/3rds of the power of your motor.

A good way to view a static phase converter is to think of a human propelled merry-go-round in a park. Picture three adults standing around the merry go round while it is stationary; each adult represents a phase, where the third adult represents the phase supplied by the static converter. Now picture all three adults grabbing the bars of the ride and then spinning in. Once they get it going the third adult runs away to take care of something else and only two adults are left spinning the ride. This is essentially what happens when you use a static phase converter to "spin" your motor.

With this disadvantage you might wonder why someone would ever use a static converter. Price. A static phase converter is the most economical way to power a piece of equipment that requires three phase power where the operator is not concerned with horsepower loss. (Note: In recent years, Variable Frequency Drives have come down in price, making it less economically attractive to run static phase converters. We will learn about this more later.)

Rotary Phase Converter

A rotary phase converter (RPC) is essentially a 3 phase electric motor that is used to generate a third phase of electricity. You can think of it as an "electric powered electric generator". Rotary phase converters are great because when sized correctly, they allow you to power your equipment on 3 phase power with no horsepower loss.

So what is the down-side? Price. Because rotary phase converters often require a larger horsepower motor than the motor you are powering, they can get expensive. Additionally, rotary phase converters are very heavy (I almost bought a used 7.5 horsepower unit that weighed 270 pounds) they present a bit of a shipping challenge when you are buying them from a remotely located vendor (although I must admit, I found a couple of vendors who offered free shipping).

If you plan on purchasing or already have more than one machine that requires 3 phase power, a rotary phase converter might be a good option for you because, if sized correctly, you can run multiple machines off of a single RPC. You might not be able to start all of the machines simultaneously, but if that is your requirement you are most likely not a hobbyist.

Variable Frequency Drive

A variable frequency drive (VFD), or AC Drive, utilizes electronics to convert single phase power into three phase power and deliver this power to your motor with no power loss. VFDs control the frequency of the electricity that is being delivered to your motor, thus allowing you to soft start your motor and to precisely control the speed of your motor's rotation. With this also comes the ability to electrically stop your motor. Although you would probably not want your TS to stop spinning on a dime, you may choose to have the VFD stop the blade from spinning within 2 seconds of hitting the "Stop" control.

So what is the down-side? VFDs require a bit more skill to setup and program for your particular need. In addition, VFDs with single phase input can get pricey - especially when you are powering motors with horsepower ratings greater than 3.

VFDs also require that they are wired to the motor directly, so you will need to implement some sort of "On/Off" switch. Most VFDs have switches, but they are tiny buttons similar to the ones that are on a electronic thermostat. Now I don't know about you, but when I am balancing a sheet of ply and need to start my saw the last thing I want is a tiny "on" button. When the ply goes through the blade the last thing I want to do is to have to look for an "off" button.

My Choice Was…

After a dozen or so hours of searching online and calling vendors for both RPCs and VFDs, I decided to go with a VFD. I did find a 7.5 hp RPC in Manhattan on Craigslist that I talked the guy down to $500.00 for, but it was very large and I don't imagine that I will be buying much more 3 phase equipment.

I was able to get a VFD for $200.00 from an online retailer. I simply called them and explained my situation and told them what I was looking for. The salesman that I talked with was a great guy and gave me a great price on the unit.

My decision to use a VFD was based off of the following:

  1. Price: For me, a $200.00 VFD seemed very reasonable. (One alternative was to replace the motor with a single phase Leeson that I found new for $300.00 w/o shipping.)
  2. My Dad is an Electrician: Because my dad and a close family friend are electricians, my labor costs are basically nothing (well, maybe a Pizza). Because they are both master electricians (and my dad is also an Electrical Engineer), I can be sure that they will hookup the VFD correctly.
  3. I wanted to keep the existing motor. My dad keeps telling me "You want 3 phase for machines that big, trust me!"

So I hope whoever reads this finds it helpful. Again I am not an Electrical Engineer or an electrician so for those that are, please don't beat me up as to the validity of my comments (I know there are some exceptions to what I said above). Before you purchase any equipment, be sure you consult with whatever vendor for whatever solution you decide and make sure that your particular piece of machinery will work with their product. As a tip, have a picture of your motor plate handy to read to them over the phone, or as I did, to email to them.

And remember, if you are uncomfortable with electricity hire a professional.

Table Machine tool Wood Gas Tool
Nice saw, hope it works out for you.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Powering a 5HP Monster with Single Phase Power

So, just as I suspected, the 66 came with a fairly new 5 horse 3 phase Baldor motor. (Yeah Me!) I was able to figure this out by calling Baldor's customer service and reading them through the different numbers on the motor plate. As it turns out, the motor is only 2 years old. The saw is 22.

As many of you know from reading other posting on Lumberjocks, there are several options to consider when your shop simply has single phase power and your machinery requires 3 phase power. The first of these options is to replace your motor all together with a new (or used) single phase motor. Because the motor in my Powermatic was so new, and because it was 5 horsepower, I could not bring myself to replace it with a 3 horse motor. I could have replaced it with a single phase 5 horsepower motor, but because the cost is so high I would be better off buying a brand new saw. This being said, I opted to keep the saw and its motor and to figure out a way to power it with single phase current.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Many of you will ask: "Mike, why do you need a 5 horsepower table saw?" My answer: "I don't! It is just the principle of it."

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Now before I begin here, I must admit that I am a Computer Scientist, not an Electrical Engineer, so forgive me if I don't have all of the facts straight or 100% correct. I did my best over the past week to evaluate the options and to come to a decision that was right for me. What follows are some of my findings that led me to my decision.

If you would like to power a three phase motor off of a single phase power source, you have the following options:

  1. Static Phase Converter
  2. Rotary Phase Converter
  3. Variable Frequency Drive (or AC Drive)

Static Phase Converter

A static phase converter is a low cost method to power a 3 phase motor on a single phase power source. A static converter is essentially a "battery" that stores up electricity that is used to power the 3rd phase of the motor. Because it stores electrical energy, it can only deliver power for a short period of time, and thus is only used to get the electric motor turning. Once spinning, the "battery" is drained of its power and stops supplying power to the third phase. For this reason, if you choose to employ a static phase converter you will only be leveraging 2/3rds of the power of your motor.

A good way to view a static phase converter is to think of a human propelled merry-go-round in a park. Picture three adults standing around the merry go round while it is stationary; each adult represents a phase, where the third adult represents the phase supplied by the static converter. Now picture all three adults grabbing the bars of the ride and then spinning in. Once they get it going the third adult runs away to take care of something else and only two adults are left spinning the ride. This is essentially what happens when you use a static phase converter to "spin" your motor.

With this disadvantage you might wonder why someone would ever use a static converter. Price. A static phase converter is the most economical way to power a piece of equipment that requires three phase power where the operator is not concerned with horsepower loss. (Note: In recent years, Variable Frequency Drives have come down in price, making it less economically attractive to run static phase converters. We will learn about this more later.)

Rotary Phase Converter

A rotary phase converter (RPC) is essentially a 3 phase electric motor that is used to generate a third phase of electricity. You can think of it as an "electric powered electric generator". Rotary phase converters are great because when sized correctly, they allow you to power your equipment on 3 phase power with no horsepower loss.

So what is the down-side? Price. Because rotary phase converters often require a larger horsepower motor than the motor you are powering, they can get expensive. Additionally, rotary phase converters are very heavy (I almost bought a used 7.5 horsepower unit that weighed 270 pounds) they present a bit of a shipping challenge when you are buying them from a remotely located vendor (although I must admit, I found a couple of vendors who offered free shipping).

If you plan on purchasing or already have more than one machine that requires 3 phase power, a rotary phase converter might be a good option for you because, if sized correctly, you can run multiple machines off of a single RPC. You might not be able to start all of the machines simultaneously, but if that is your requirement you are most likely not a hobbyist.

Variable Frequency Drive

A variable frequency drive (VFD), or AC Drive, utilizes electronics to convert single phase power into three phase power and deliver this power to your motor with no power loss. VFDs control the frequency of the electricity that is being delivered to your motor, thus allowing you to soft start your motor and to precisely control the speed of your motor's rotation. With this also comes the ability to electrically stop your motor. Although you would probably not want your TS to stop spinning on a dime, you may choose to have the VFD stop the blade from spinning within 2 seconds of hitting the "Stop" control.

So what is the down-side? VFDs require a bit more skill to setup and program for your particular need. In addition, VFDs with single phase input can get pricey - especially when you are powering motors with horsepower ratings greater than 3.

VFDs also require that they are wired to the motor directly, so you will need to implement some sort of "On/Off" switch. Most VFDs have switches, but they are tiny buttons similar to the ones that are on a electronic thermostat. Now I don't know about you, but when I am balancing a sheet of ply and need to start my saw the last thing I want is a tiny "on" button. When the ply goes through the blade the last thing I want to do is to have to look for an "off" button.

My Choice Was…

After a dozen or so hours of searching online and calling vendors for both RPCs and VFDs, I decided to go with a VFD. I did find a 7.5 hp RPC in Manhattan on Craigslist that I talked the guy down to $500.00 for, but it was very large and I don't imagine that I will be buying much more 3 phase equipment.

I was able to get a VFD for $200.00 from an online retailer. I simply called them and explained my situation and told them what I was looking for. The salesman that I talked with was a great guy and gave me a great price on the unit.

My decision to use a VFD was based off of the following:

  1. Price: For me, a $200.00 VFD seemed very reasonable. (One alternative was to replace the motor with a single phase Leeson that I found new for $300.00 w/o shipping.)
  2. My Dad is an Electrician: Because my dad and a close family friend are electricians, my labor costs are basically nothing (well, maybe a Pizza). Because they are both master electricians (and my dad is also an Electrical Engineer), I can be sure that they will hookup the VFD correctly.
  3. I wanted to keep the existing motor. My dad keeps telling me "You want 3 phase for machines that big, trust me!"

So I hope whoever reads this finds it helpful. Again I am not an Electrical Engineer or an electrician so for those that are, please don't beat me up as to the validity of my comments (I know there are some exceptions to what I said above). Before you purchase any equipment, be sure you consult with whatever vendor for whatever solution you decide and make sure that your particular piece of machinery will work with their product. As a tip, have a picture of your motor plate handy to read to them over the phone, or as I did, to email to them.

And remember, if you are uncomfortable with electricity hire a professional.

Table Machine tool Wood Gas Tool
Mike,

Thanks for the logical and detailed explanation. Looks like a great machine you got there.
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 47 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top