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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Concept and Casework, Shelves

I saw this in an older Fine Woodworking issue (#202) and was compelled to finish my outfeed table for my Unisaw.

Mine needs to be built a little different as I have the sliding table to the left of my saw, and the left extension wing is removed. My storage below the table will really only have only one usable side and end. I designed it to be 90 degrees from the photo, two drawers at the bottom, table saw blade storage, and an open spot for my dado blade kits on the higher level.



I started out with the only 3/4" baltic birch I had on hand being a little warped and that has caused all kinds of issues.

Decided to update the storage system for my table saw blades as well, not fond of the idea of damaging the teeth if one slipped out of my hand (as in the photo above). I found a number of concepts, combined them and hope mine turns out well.

Now have the cabinet built (working on straightening middle shelf now) and working on the 1/2" pieces for the blade storage.

I attempted to build this unit without mechanical fasteners (using only glue and the Festool Domino system), but with the warped plywood, ended up putting in one screw and a few brads to tighten the joints up.



Trying to pressure the center shelf and bottom of the case to bend a bit with clamps and cauls…not having much luck.

I built the case 42" long x 27 1/2" wide.

A 4" base includes the adjustable feet.
The case is almost 29 1/4" tall, and adding the laminated piece for the top, it comes close to 34" (height of the top of the Unisaw).





The shelves are ganged together to sand out irregularities in the bandsaw cuts.



The 1/2" shelves are sanded now and next I will rout the front edge and access hole, then add the spacers / slides.

Part 2.
 
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13,555 Posts
Concept and Casework, Shelves

I saw this in an older Fine Woodworking issue (#202) and was compelled to finish my outfeed table for my Unisaw.

Mine needs to be built a little different as I have the sliding table to the left of my saw, and the left extension wing is removed. My storage below the table will really only have only one usable side and end. I designed it to be 90 degrees from the photo, two drawers at the bottom, table saw blade storage, and an open spot for my dado blade kits on the higher level.



I started out with the only 3/4" baltic birch I had on hand being a little warped and that has caused all kinds of issues.

Decided to update the storage system for my table saw blades as well, not fond of the idea of damaging the teeth if one slipped out of my hand (as in the photo above). I found a number of concepts, combined them and hope mine turns out well.

Now have the cabinet built (working on straightening middle shelf now) and working on the 1/2" pieces for the blade storage.

I attempted to build this unit without mechanical fasteners (using only glue and the Festool Domino system), but with the warped plywood, ended up putting in one screw and a few brads to tighten the joints up.



Trying to pressure the center shelf and bottom of the case to bend a bit with clamps and cauls…not having much luck.

I built the case 42" long x 27 1/2" wide.

A 4" base includes the adjustable feet.
The case is almost 29 1/4" tall, and adding the laminated piece for the top, it comes close to 34" (height of the top of the Unisaw).





The shelves are ganged together to sand out irregularities in the bandsaw cuts.



The 1/2" shelves are sanded now and next I will rout the front edge and access hole, then add the spacers / slides.

Part 2.
Nice start!
 

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Concept and Casework, Shelves

I saw this in an older Fine Woodworking issue (#202) and was compelled to finish my outfeed table for my Unisaw.

Mine needs to be built a little different as I have the sliding table to the left of my saw, and the left extension wing is removed. My storage below the table will really only have only one usable side and end. I designed it to be 90 degrees from the photo, two drawers at the bottom, table saw blade storage, and an open spot for my dado blade kits on the higher level.



I started out with the only 3/4" baltic birch I had on hand being a little warped and that has caused all kinds of issues.

Decided to update the storage system for my table saw blades as well, not fond of the idea of damaging the teeth if one slipped out of my hand (as in the photo above). I found a number of concepts, combined them and hope mine turns out well.

Now have the cabinet built (working on straightening middle shelf now) and working on the 1/2" pieces for the blade storage.

I attempted to build this unit without mechanical fasteners (using only glue and the Festool Domino system), but with the warped plywood, ended up putting in one screw and a few brads to tighten the joints up.



Trying to pressure the center shelf and bottom of the case to bend a bit with clamps and cauls…not having much luck.

I built the case 42" long x 27 1/2" wide.

A 4" base includes the adjustable feet.
The case is almost 29 1/4" tall, and adding the laminated piece for the top, it comes close to 34" (height of the top of the Unisaw).





The shelves are ganged together to sand out irregularities in the bandsaw cuts.



The 1/2" shelves are sanded now and next I will rout the front edge and access hole, then add the spacers / slides.

Part 2.
Nice start and the final project looks beautiful

Good luck for the future
 

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Concept and Casework, Shelves

I saw this in an older Fine Woodworking issue (#202) and was compelled to finish my outfeed table for my Unisaw.

Mine needs to be built a little different as I have the sliding table to the left of my saw, and the left extension wing is removed. My storage below the table will really only have only one usable side and end. I designed it to be 90 degrees from the photo, two drawers at the bottom, table saw blade storage, and an open spot for my dado blade kits on the higher level.



I started out with the only 3/4" baltic birch I had on hand being a little warped and that has caused all kinds of issues.

Decided to update the storage system for my table saw blades as well, not fond of the idea of damaging the teeth if one slipped out of my hand (as in the photo above). I found a number of concepts, combined them and hope mine turns out well.

Now have the cabinet built (working on straightening middle shelf now) and working on the 1/2" pieces for the blade storage.

I attempted to build this unit without mechanical fasteners (using only glue and the Festool Domino system), but with the warped plywood, ended up putting in one screw and a few brads to tighten the joints up.



Trying to pressure the center shelf and bottom of the case to bend a bit with clamps and cauls…not having much luck.

I built the case 42" long x 27 1/2" wide.

A 4" base includes the adjustable feet.
The case is almost 29 1/4" tall, and adding the laminated piece for the top, it comes close to 34" (height of the top of the Unisaw).





The shelves are ganged together to sand out irregularities in the bandsaw cuts.



The 1/2" shelves are sanded now and next I will rout the front edge and access hole, then add the spacers / slides.

Part 2.
Very cool. Can't wait to see the finished product.
 

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2,351 Posts
Concept and Casework, Shelves

I saw this in an older Fine Woodworking issue (#202) and was compelled to finish my outfeed table for my Unisaw.

Mine needs to be built a little different as I have the sliding table to the left of my saw, and the left extension wing is removed. My storage below the table will really only have only one usable side and end. I designed it to be 90 degrees from the photo, two drawers at the bottom, table saw blade storage, and an open spot for my dado blade kits on the higher level.



I started out with the only 3/4" baltic birch I had on hand being a little warped and that has caused all kinds of issues.

Decided to update the storage system for my table saw blades as well, not fond of the idea of damaging the teeth if one slipped out of my hand (as in the photo above). I found a number of concepts, combined them and hope mine turns out well.

Now have the cabinet built (working on straightening middle shelf now) and working on the 1/2" pieces for the blade storage.

I attempted to build this unit without mechanical fasteners (using only glue and the Festool Domino system), but with the warped plywood, ended up putting in one screw and a few brads to tighten the joints up.



Trying to pressure the center shelf and bottom of the case to bend a bit with clamps and cauls…not having much luck.

I built the case 42" long x 27 1/2" wide.

A 4" base includes the adjustable feet.
The case is almost 29 1/4" tall, and adding the laminated piece for the top, it comes close to 34" (height of the top of the Unisaw).





The shelves are ganged together to sand out irregularities in the bandsaw cuts.



The 1/2" shelves are sanded now and next I will rout the front edge and access hole, then add the spacers / slides.

Part 2.
I agree with CiscoKid I can't wait to see the finished product

I want to make one for my table saw and my semi router table

Thanks for sharing
 

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Concept and Casework, Shelves

I saw this in an older Fine Woodworking issue (#202) and was compelled to finish my outfeed table for my Unisaw.

Mine needs to be built a little different as I have the sliding table to the left of my saw, and the left extension wing is removed. My storage below the table will really only have only one usable side and end. I designed it to be 90 degrees from the photo, two drawers at the bottom, table saw blade storage, and an open spot for my dado blade kits on the higher level.



I started out with the only 3/4" baltic birch I had on hand being a little warped and that has caused all kinds of issues.

Decided to update the storage system for my table saw blades as well, not fond of the idea of damaging the teeth if one slipped out of my hand (as in the photo above). I found a number of concepts, combined them and hope mine turns out well.

Now have the cabinet built (working on straightening middle shelf now) and working on the 1/2" pieces for the blade storage.

I attempted to build this unit without mechanical fasteners (using only glue and the Festool Domino system), but with the warped plywood, ended up putting in one screw and a few brads to tighten the joints up.



Trying to pressure the center shelf and bottom of the case to bend a bit with clamps and cauls…not having much luck.

I built the case 42" long x 27 1/2" wide.

A 4" base includes the adjustable feet.
The case is almost 29 1/4" tall, and adding the laminated piece for the top, it comes close to 34" (height of the top of the Unisaw).





The shelves are ganged together to sand out irregularities in the bandsaw cuts.



The 1/2" shelves are sanded now and next I will rout the front edge and access hole, then add the spacers / slides.

Part 2.
That is very cool if you have the space! Nice way to go…............Jim
 

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Concept and Casework, Shelves

I saw this in an older Fine Woodworking issue (#202) and was compelled to finish my outfeed table for my Unisaw.

Mine needs to be built a little different as I have the sliding table to the left of my saw, and the left extension wing is removed. My storage below the table will really only have only one usable side and end. I designed it to be 90 degrees from the photo, two drawers at the bottom, table saw blade storage, and an open spot for my dado blade kits on the higher level.



I started out with the only 3/4" baltic birch I had on hand being a little warped and that has caused all kinds of issues.

Decided to update the storage system for my table saw blades as well, not fond of the idea of damaging the teeth if one slipped out of my hand (as in the photo above). I found a number of concepts, combined them and hope mine turns out well.

Now have the cabinet built (working on straightening middle shelf now) and working on the 1/2" pieces for the blade storage.

I attempted to build this unit without mechanical fasteners (using only glue and the Festool Domino system), but with the warped plywood, ended up putting in one screw and a few brads to tighten the joints up.



Trying to pressure the center shelf and bottom of the case to bend a bit with clamps and cauls…not having much luck.

I built the case 42" long x 27 1/2" wide.

A 4" base includes the adjustable feet.
The case is almost 29 1/4" tall, and adding the laminated piece for the top, it comes close to 34" (height of the top of the Unisaw).





The shelves are ganged together to sand out irregularities in the bandsaw cuts.



The 1/2" shelves are sanded now and next I will rout the front edge and access hole, then add the spacers / slides.

Part 2.
Thanks for sharing. Currently I have an old island top held up with 2×4's
Just the inspiration I needed.
Brian Keeping
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Taking way to long to complete this simple project...

I finally got some time back in the shop.

I calculated the size of the outfeed table, had a friend with a cold press laminate both sides of a sheet of MDF for me, I cut it roughly to size and set it aside to finish up the base cabinet.

I lost some photos somewhere for the middle of this process, but once my blade storage shelves were sanded out, I turned some purpleheart center dowels on the lathe for the blades to sit on. I made two sizes, one for the 10" blades, and one for the 12" and Festool sized blades.

I also cut 1/4" plywood spacers to fit between the blades.

Then I cut the fronts from purpleheart, installed them and gave them a coat of shellac.

I put on a "spit coat" of shellac to protect the baltic birch cabinet from getting dirty or greasy fingerprints on it, then installed the sliding plywood "shelves" and waxed them to ensure easy movement.





Then built a new finger-joint jig and ripped 1/2" pieces of plywood to make the drawer boxes.

While looking for a thin strip of plywood, I mistakenly picked up one of the sides, and ripped a nice 1 1/2" piece off of it. After realizing what I had done, I had to cut that drawer down, but left the other full height.

While assembling the drawer boxes, I had an alignment issue with the larger box, ended up pulling it apart and breaking loose some of the plywood veneer…now I am not so anxious to finish but have to keep going.

Second mistake of that night was to cut one of the drawer bottoms almost 1/4" too small, and now starting to think it would look good in the fireplace.

Finally got the drawers patched up, glue blocks on the underside of the "almost too small bottom" and they received two coats of shellac.

Amazing how many of the simple steps you really have to really think about when you are away from the process for a few years.

I had planed and glued up the purpleheart pieces for my drawer fronts, and when I checked to see how they looked, noticed both had cupped a bit. So out came the plane and after I flattened them, I then ran them back through the Performax, and lost all that nice purple color again…

My cousin came over for a visit, and I talked him into helping me set the top in place, make a few adjustments and fasten it to the saw supports and screw it to the cabinet.



As we were doing this, I realized I had made an error in measuring, and that my cabinet was going to sit about a foot closer to the saw than I planned…



I need access on the right side, so trimmed an angle off, then taped another angle to see if I liked it better. I think I will just round those edges off and leave it the way I originally cut it.

Next was to install the drawers, and I had posted the problem I had with the Accuride slides (I had two sets of 18" slides in one box, turned out they were different model numbers and once assembled, would not come apart), but that's another chapter…

Now that they are installed, finish up sizing the drawer fronts, and set up to install them.



I have used this Blum system in the past with attached fronts, it involved drilling a 20mm hole in the hardwood front, inserting a "marker" (my cousin turned these aluminum ones on a metal lathe for me), pressing them up against the drawer and then drilling a hole in the drawer where the mark was made.







AFTER that is done, insert the Blum adjuster and install the front by fastening the screw through the drawer into the metal part of the adjuster. Photos will be better at explaining it.







Once installed, they have 1/8" movement in all directions, so it makes for easy and quick adjustment to ensure the drawer fronts have the same reveal all around.

After they are adjusted to fit the opening, I secure the drawers with 1" screws to ensure they are not going anywhere (size is roughly 22" x 11")



Now I will design a handle (maybe baltic birch to match?), and let the drawer fronts "turn purple" again before putting a clear coat of shellac on them.







I hope you have enjoyed the tour of this project, and I am sure you will be able to benefit by my mistakes… :)

If you have any questions, let me know and I will illustrate with photos if necessary.
 

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Taking way to long to complete this simple project...

I finally got some time back in the shop.

I calculated the size of the outfeed table, had a friend with a cold press laminate both sides of a sheet of MDF for me, I cut it roughly to size and set it aside to finish up the base cabinet.

I lost some photos somewhere for the middle of this process, but once my blade storage shelves were sanded out, I turned some purpleheart center dowels on the lathe for the blades to sit on. I made two sizes, one for the 10" blades, and one for the 12" and Festool sized blades.

I also cut 1/4" plywood spacers to fit between the blades.

Then I cut the fronts from purpleheart, installed them and gave them a coat of shellac.

I put on a "spit coat" of shellac to protect the baltic birch cabinet from getting dirty or greasy fingerprints on it, then installed the sliding plywood "shelves" and waxed them to ensure easy movement.





Then built a new finger-joint jig and ripped 1/2" pieces of plywood to make the drawer boxes.

While looking for a thin strip of plywood, I mistakenly picked up one of the sides, and ripped a nice 1 1/2" piece off of it. After realizing what I had done, I had to cut that drawer down, but left the other full height.

While assembling the drawer boxes, I had an alignment issue with the larger box, ended up pulling it apart and breaking loose some of the plywood veneer…now I am not so anxious to finish but have to keep going.

Second mistake of that night was to cut one of the drawer bottoms almost 1/4" too small, and now starting to think it would look good in the fireplace.

Finally got the drawers patched up, glue blocks on the underside of the "almost too small bottom" and they received two coats of shellac.

Amazing how many of the simple steps you really have to really think about when you are away from the process for a few years.

I had planed and glued up the purpleheart pieces for my drawer fronts, and when I checked to see how they looked, noticed both had cupped a bit. So out came the plane and after I flattened them, I then ran them back through the Performax, and lost all that nice purple color again…

My cousin came over for a visit, and I talked him into helping me set the top in place, make a few adjustments and fasten it to the saw supports and screw it to the cabinet.



As we were doing this, I realized I had made an error in measuring, and that my cabinet was going to sit about a foot closer to the saw than I planned…



I need access on the right side, so trimmed an angle off, then taped another angle to see if I liked it better. I think I will just round those edges off and leave it the way I originally cut it.

Next was to install the drawers, and I had posted the problem I had with the Accuride slides (I had two sets of 18" slides in one box, turned out they were different model numbers and once assembled, would not come apart), but that's another chapter…

Now that they are installed, finish up sizing the drawer fronts, and set up to install them.



I have used this Blum system in the past with attached fronts, it involved drilling a 20mm hole in the hardwood front, inserting a "marker" (my cousin turned these aluminum ones on a metal lathe for me), pressing them up against the drawer and then drilling a hole in the drawer where the mark was made.







AFTER that is done, insert the Blum adjuster and install the front by fastening the screw through the drawer into the metal part of the adjuster. Photos will be better at explaining it.







Once installed, they have 1/8" movement in all directions, so it makes for easy and quick adjustment to ensure the drawer fronts have the same reveal all around.

After they are adjusted to fit the opening, I secure the drawers with 1" screws to ensure they are not going anywhere (size is roughly 22" x 11")



Now I will design a handle (maybe baltic birch to match?), and let the drawer fronts "turn purple" again before putting a clear coat of shellac on them.







I hope you have enjoyed the tour of this project, and I am sure you will be able to benefit by my mistakes… :)

If you have any questions, let me know and I will illustrate with photos if necessary.
looks very nice Randy.
As ole Norm used to do you can call this one a "proto type".
It's really a trick to get a new project bang on with only one chance and no plan to go from.

p.s. all my stuff is prototype.;-)
 

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Joined
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3,958 Posts
Taking way to long to complete this simple project...

I finally got some time back in the shop.

I calculated the size of the outfeed table, had a friend with a cold press laminate both sides of a sheet of MDF for me, I cut it roughly to size and set it aside to finish up the base cabinet.

I lost some photos somewhere for the middle of this process, but once my blade storage shelves were sanded out, I turned some purpleheart center dowels on the lathe for the blades to sit on. I made two sizes, one for the 10" blades, and one for the 12" and Festool sized blades.

I also cut 1/4" plywood spacers to fit between the blades.

Then I cut the fronts from purpleheart, installed them and gave them a coat of shellac.

I put on a "spit coat" of shellac to protect the baltic birch cabinet from getting dirty or greasy fingerprints on it, then installed the sliding plywood "shelves" and waxed them to ensure easy movement.





Then built a new finger-joint jig and ripped 1/2" pieces of plywood to make the drawer boxes.

While looking for a thin strip of plywood, I mistakenly picked up one of the sides, and ripped a nice 1 1/2" piece off of it. After realizing what I had done, I had to cut that drawer down, but left the other full height.

While assembling the drawer boxes, I had an alignment issue with the larger box, ended up pulling it apart and breaking loose some of the plywood veneer…now I am not so anxious to finish but have to keep going.

Second mistake of that night was to cut one of the drawer bottoms almost 1/4" too small, and now starting to think it would look good in the fireplace.

Finally got the drawers patched up, glue blocks on the underside of the "almost too small bottom" and they received two coats of shellac.

Amazing how many of the simple steps you really have to really think about when you are away from the process for a few years.

I had planed and glued up the purpleheart pieces for my drawer fronts, and when I checked to see how they looked, noticed both had cupped a bit. So out came the plane and after I flattened them, I then ran them back through the Performax, and lost all that nice purple color again…

My cousin came over for a visit, and I talked him into helping me set the top in place, make a few adjustments and fasten it to the saw supports and screw it to the cabinet.



As we were doing this, I realized I had made an error in measuring, and that my cabinet was going to sit about a foot closer to the saw than I planned…



I need access on the right side, so trimmed an angle off, then taped another angle to see if I liked it better. I think I will just round those edges off and leave it the way I originally cut it.

Next was to install the drawers, and I had posted the problem I had with the Accuride slides (I had two sets of 18" slides in one box, turned out they were different model numbers and once assembled, would not come apart), but that's another chapter…

Now that they are installed, finish up sizing the drawer fronts, and set up to install them.



I have used this Blum system in the past with attached fronts, it involved drilling a 20mm hole in the hardwood front, inserting a "marker" (my cousin turned these aluminum ones on a metal lathe for me), pressing them up against the drawer and then drilling a hole in the drawer where the mark was made.







AFTER that is done, insert the Blum adjuster and install the front by fastening the screw through the drawer into the metal part of the adjuster. Photos will be better at explaining it.







Once installed, they have 1/8" movement in all directions, so it makes for easy and quick adjustment to ensure the drawer fronts have the same reveal all around.

After they are adjusted to fit the opening, I secure the drawers with 1" screws to ensure they are not going anywhere (size is roughly 22" x 11")



Now I will design a handle (maybe baltic birch to match?), and let the drawer fronts "turn purple" again before putting a clear coat of shellac on them.







I hope you have enjoyed the tour of this project, and I am sure you will be able to benefit by my mistakes… :)

If you have any questions, let me know and I will illustrate with photos if necessary.
Looks very nice Randy.
As ole Norm used to do you can call this one a "proto type".
It's really a trick to get a new project bang on with only one chance and no plan to go from.

Question: Why did you decide to put the saw blade storage on the back?
p.s. all my stuff is prototype.;-)
 

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254 Posts
Taking way to long to complete this simple project...

I finally got some time back in the shop.

I calculated the size of the outfeed table, had a friend with a cold press laminate both sides of a sheet of MDF for me, I cut it roughly to size and set it aside to finish up the base cabinet.

I lost some photos somewhere for the middle of this process, but once my blade storage shelves were sanded out, I turned some purpleheart center dowels on the lathe for the blades to sit on. I made two sizes, one for the 10" blades, and one for the 12" and Festool sized blades.

I also cut 1/4" plywood spacers to fit between the blades.

Then I cut the fronts from purpleheart, installed them and gave them a coat of shellac.

I put on a "spit coat" of shellac to protect the baltic birch cabinet from getting dirty or greasy fingerprints on it, then installed the sliding plywood "shelves" and waxed them to ensure easy movement.





Then built a new finger-joint jig and ripped 1/2" pieces of plywood to make the drawer boxes.

While looking for a thin strip of plywood, I mistakenly picked up one of the sides, and ripped a nice 1 1/2" piece off of it. After realizing what I had done, I had to cut that drawer down, but left the other full height.

While assembling the drawer boxes, I had an alignment issue with the larger box, ended up pulling it apart and breaking loose some of the plywood veneer…now I am not so anxious to finish but have to keep going.

Second mistake of that night was to cut one of the drawer bottoms almost 1/4" too small, and now starting to think it would look good in the fireplace.

Finally got the drawers patched up, glue blocks on the underside of the "almost too small bottom" and they received two coats of shellac.

Amazing how many of the simple steps you really have to really think about when you are away from the process for a few years.

I had planed and glued up the purpleheart pieces for my drawer fronts, and when I checked to see how they looked, noticed both had cupped a bit. So out came the plane and after I flattened them, I then ran them back through the Performax, and lost all that nice purple color again…

My cousin came over for a visit, and I talked him into helping me set the top in place, make a few adjustments and fasten it to the saw supports and screw it to the cabinet.



As we were doing this, I realized I had made an error in measuring, and that my cabinet was going to sit about a foot closer to the saw than I planned…



I need access on the right side, so trimmed an angle off, then taped another angle to see if I liked it better. I think I will just round those edges off and leave it the way I originally cut it.

Next was to install the drawers, and I had posted the problem I had with the Accuride slides (I had two sets of 18" slides in one box, turned out they were different model numbers and once assembled, would not come apart), but that's another chapter…

Now that they are installed, finish up sizing the drawer fronts, and set up to install them.



I have used this Blum system in the past with attached fronts, it involved drilling a 20mm hole in the hardwood front, inserting a "marker" (my cousin turned these aluminum ones on a metal lathe for me), pressing them up against the drawer and then drilling a hole in the drawer where the mark was made.







AFTER that is done, insert the Blum adjuster and install the front by fastening the screw through the drawer into the metal part of the adjuster. Photos will be better at explaining it.







Once installed, they have 1/8" movement in all directions, so it makes for easy and quick adjustment to ensure the drawer fronts have the same reveal all around.

After they are adjusted to fit the opening, I secure the drawers with 1" screws to ensure they are not going anywhere (size is roughly 22" x 11")



Now I will design a handle (maybe baltic birch to match?), and let the drawer fronts "turn purple" again before putting a clear coat of shellac on them.







I hope you have enjoyed the tour of this project, and I am sure you will be able to benefit by my mistakes… :)

If you have any questions, let me know and I will illustrate with photos if necessary.
That's a great work surface to have. I wish I had the space to do something similar. As it is I have to keep everything on wheels in my shop.
 
Joined
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13,555 Posts
Taking way to long to complete this simple project...

I finally got some time back in the shop.

I calculated the size of the outfeed table, had a friend with a cold press laminate both sides of a sheet of MDF for me, I cut it roughly to size and set it aside to finish up the base cabinet.

I lost some photos somewhere for the middle of this process, but once my blade storage shelves were sanded out, I turned some purpleheart center dowels on the lathe for the blades to sit on. I made two sizes, one for the 10" blades, and one for the 12" and Festool sized blades.

I also cut 1/4" plywood spacers to fit between the blades.

Then I cut the fronts from purpleheart, installed them and gave them a coat of shellac.

I put on a "spit coat" of shellac to protect the baltic birch cabinet from getting dirty or greasy fingerprints on it, then installed the sliding plywood "shelves" and waxed them to ensure easy movement.





Then built a new finger-joint jig and ripped 1/2" pieces of plywood to make the drawer boxes.

While looking for a thin strip of plywood, I mistakenly picked up one of the sides, and ripped a nice 1 1/2" piece off of it. After realizing what I had done, I had to cut that drawer down, but left the other full height.

While assembling the drawer boxes, I had an alignment issue with the larger box, ended up pulling it apart and breaking loose some of the plywood veneer…now I am not so anxious to finish but have to keep going.

Second mistake of that night was to cut one of the drawer bottoms almost 1/4" too small, and now starting to think it would look good in the fireplace.

Finally got the drawers patched up, glue blocks on the underside of the "almost too small bottom" and they received two coats of shellac.

Amazing how many of the simple steps you really have to really think about when you are away from the process for a few years.

I had planed and glued up the purpleheart pieces for my drawer fronts, and when I checked to see how they looked, noticed both had cupped a bit. So out came the plane and after I flattened them, I then ran them back through the Performax, and lost all that nice purple color again…

My cousin came over for a visit, and I talked him into helping me set the top in place, make a few adjustments and fasten it to the saw supports and screw it to the cabinet.



As we were doing this, I realized I had made an error in measuring, and that my cabinet was going to sit about a foot closer to the saw than I planned…



I need access on the right side, so trimmed an angle off, then taped another angle to see if I liked it better. I think I will just round those edges off and leave it the way I originally cut it.

Next was to install the drawers, and I had posted the problem I had with the Accuride slides (I had two sets of 18" slides in one box, turned out they were different model numbers and once assembled, would not come apart), but that's another chapter…

Now that they are installed, finish up sizing the drawer fronts, and set up to install them.



I have used this Blum system in the past with attached fronts, it involved drilling a 20mm hole in the hardwood front, inserting a "marker" (my cousin turned these aluminum ones on a metal lathe for me), pressing them up against the drawer and then drilling a hole in the drawer where the mark was made.







AFTER that is done, insert the Blum adjuster and install the front by fastening the screw through the drawer into the metal part of the adjuster. Photos will be better at explaining it.







Once installed, they have 1/8" movement in all directions, so it makes for easy and quick adjustment to ensure the drawer fronts have the same reveal all around.

After they are adjusted to fit the opening, I secure the drawers with 1" screws to ensure they are not going anywhere (size is roughly 22" x 11")



Now I will design a handle (maybe baltic birch to match?), and let the drawer fronts "turn purple" again before putting a clear coat of shellac on them.







I hope you have enjoyed the tour of this project, and I am sure you will be able to benefit by my mistakes… :)

If you have any questions, let me know and I will illustrate with photos if necessary.
Thats a nice outfeed table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Taking way to long to complete this simple project...

I finally got some time back in the shop.

I calculated the size of the outfeed table, had a friend with a cold press laminate both sides of a sheet of MDF for me, I cut it roughly to size and set it aside to finish up the base cabinet.

I lost some photos somewhere for the middle of this process, but once my blade storage shelves were sanded out, I turned some purpleheart center dowels on the lathe for the blades to sit on. I made two sizes, one for the 10" blades, and one for the 12" and Festool sized blades.

I also cut 1/4" plywood spacers to fit between the blades.

Then I cut the fronts from purpleheart, installed them and gave them a coat of shellac.

I put on a "spit coat" of shellac to protect the baltic birch cabinet from getting dirty or greasy fingerprints on it, then installed the sliding plywood "shelves" and waxed them to ensure easy movement.





Then built a new finger-joint jig and ripped 1/2" pieces of plywood to make the drawer boxes.

While looking for a thin strip of plywood, I mistakenly picked up one of the sides, and ripped a nice 1 1/2" piece off of it. After realizing what I had done, I had to cut that drawer down, but left the other full height.

While assembling the drawer boxes, I had an alignment issue with the larger box, ended up pulling it apart and breaking loose some of the plywood veneer…now I am not so anxious to finish but have to keep going.

Second mistake of that night was to cut one of the drawer bottoms almost 1/4" too small, and now starting to think it would look good in the fireplace.

Finally got the drawers patched up, glue blocks on the underside of the "almost too small bottom" and they received two coats of shellac.

Amazing how many of the simple steps you really have to really think about when you are away from the process for a few years.

I had planed and glued up the purpleheart pieces for my drawer fronts, and when I checked to see how they looked, noticed both had cupped a bit. So out came the plane and after I flattened them, I then ran them back through the Performax, and lost all that nice purple color again…

My cousin came over for a visit, and I talked him into helping me set the top in place, make a few adjustments and fasten it to the saw supports and screw it to the cabinet.



As we were doing this, I realized I had made an error in measuring, and that my cabinet was going to sit about a foot closer to the saw than I planned…



I need access on the right side, so trimmed an angle off, then taped another angle to see if I liked it better. I think I will just round those edges off and leave it the way I originally cut it.

Next was to install the drawers, and I had posted the problem I had with the Accuride slides (I had two sets of 18" slides in one box, turned out they were different model numbers and once assembled, would not come apart), but that's another chapter…

Now that they are installed, finish up sizing the drawer fronts, and set up to install them.



I have used this Blum system in the past with attached fronts, it involved drilling a 20mm hole in the hardwood front, inserting a "marker" (my cousin turned these aluminum ones on a metal lathe for me), pressing them up against the drawer and then drilling a hole in the drawer where the mark was made.







AFTER that is done, insert the Blum adjuster and install the front by fastening the screw through the drawer into the metal part of the adjuster. Photos will be better at explaining it.







Once installed, they have 1/8" movement in all directions, so it makes for easy and quick adjustment to ensure the drawer fronts have the same reveal all around.

After they are adjusted to fit the opening, I secure the drawers with 1" screws to ensure they are not going anywhere (size is roughly 22" x 11")



Now I will design a handle (maybe baltic birch to match?), and let the drawer fronts "turn purple" again before putting a clear coat of shellac on them.







I hope you have enjoyed the tour of this project, and I am sure you will be able to benefit by my mistakes… :)

If you have any questions, let me know and I will illustrate with photos if necessary.
Thanks for the comments!

Bob, this is my only prototype. It should outlast me.

It's good to go for a walk once in awhile… so to select my blade where the light is good and out of the way seemed to work for me.

My first thought was to build my blade storage under the right front of the saw, but I need my jigs and push sticks and hold downs in those drawers, so to the back it went.

Come on over and take a look!
 

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Taking way to long to complete this simple project...

I finally got some time back in the shop.

I calculated the size of the outfeed table, had a friend with a cold press laminate both sides of a sheet of MDF for me, I cut it roughly to size and set it aside to finish up the base cabinet.

I lost some photos somewhere for the middle of this process, but once my blade storage shelves were sanded out, I turned some purpleheart center dowels on the lathe for the blades to sit on. I made two sizes, one for the 10" blades, and one for the 12" and Festool sized blades.

I also cut 1/4" plywood spacers to fit between the blades.

Then I cut the fronts from purpleheart, installed them and gave them a coat of shellac.

I put on a "spit coat" of shellac to protect the baltic birch cabinet from getting dirty or greasy fingerprints on it, then installed the sliding plywood "shelves" and waxed them to ensure easy movement.





Then built a new finger-joint jig and ripped 1/2" pieces of plywood to make the drawer boxes.

While looking for a thin strip of plywood, I mistakenly picked up one of the sides, and ripped a nice 1 1/2" piece off of it. After realizing what I had done, I had to cut that drawer down, but left the other full height.

While assembling the drawer boxes, I had an alignment issue with the larger box, ended up pulling it apart and breaking loose some of the plywood veneer…now I am not so anxious to finish but have to keep going.

Second mistake of that night was to cut one of the drawer bottoms almost 1/4" too small, and now starting to think it would look good in the fireplace.

Finally got the drawers patched up, glue blocks on the underside of the "almost too small bottom" and they received two coats of shellac.

Amazing how many of the simple steps you really have to really think about when you are away from the process for a few years.

I had planed and glued up the purpleheart pieces for my drawer fronts, and when I checked to see how they looked, noticed both had cupped a bit. So out came the plane and after I flattened them, I then ran them back through the Performax, and lost all that nice purple color again…

My cousin came over for a visit, and I talked him into helping me set the top in place, make a few adjustments and fasten it to the saw supports and screw it to the cabinet.



As we were doing this, I realized I had made an error in measuring, and that my cabinet was going to sit about a foot closer to the saw than I planned…



I need access on the right side, so trimmed an angle off, then taped another angle to see if I liked it better. I think I will just round those edges off and leave it the way I originally cut it.

Next was to install the drawers, and I had posted the problem I had with the Accuride slides (I had two sets of 18" slides in one box, turned out they were different model numbers and once assembled, would not come apart), but that's another chapter…

Now that they are installed, finish up sizing the drawer fronts, and set up to install them.



I have used this Blum system in the past with attached fronts, it involved drilling a 20mm hole in the hardwood front, inserting a "marker" (my cousin turned these aluminum ones on a metal lathe for me), pressing them up against the drawer and then drilling a hole in the drawer where the mark was made.







AFTER that is done, insert the Blum adjuster and install the front by fastening the screw through the drawer into the metal part of the adjuster. Photos will be better at explaining it.







Once installed, they have 1/8" movement in all directions, so it makes for easy and quick adjustment to ensure the drawer fronts have the same reveal all around.

After they are adjusted to fit the opening, I secure the drawers with 1" screws to ensure they are not going anywhere (size is roughly 22" x 11")



Now I will design a handle (maybe baltic birch to match?), and let the drawer fronts "turn purple" again before putting a clear coat of shellac on them.







I hope you have enjoyed the tour of this project, and I am sure you will be able to benefit by my mistakes… :)

If you have any questions, let me know and I will illustrate with photos if necessary.
Thanks for the invite.
I'll have to make it a bit later on . Out of town for a bit next week.
 
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