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horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Bravo !!!!!!!!!!!! Excellent build, Mads!!!!!!!!!!!!

cheers, Jim
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,953 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Thanks for the detailed how-to, Mads!
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
7,335 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Nice solution, Mads! Looks like that will serve you well wherever you happen to be.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,494 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
MaFe,

That project/idea is fantastic. Things like this is why I love LJ so much. Thankyou for posting.

p.s. I think this will evolve into a product line for some tool mfg for sure.

Great idea
 

· Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Upon a full reading it is more terrific than I first imagined. Well done, lad (mad?).
 

· Banned
Joined
·
18,919 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
always love your blogs and all the pic's you provide,you always inspire me to do more buddy.so glad you got through the depression and are back at it.when and what you do here will be your choice that i respect my friend.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Cant see any pictures :(
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Frustrator, I have written LJ and asked them what goes on, I have begun to get messages from people using mobiles, that they can't see the pictures… I guess it's because mine and others pictures are on our own servers, not on LJ and something on LJ stops that now, when you are on the phone…
I expect they will solve the problem as soon as possible, sorry.
So you have to look on a computer until they solve it.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,736 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
doesn't work on the computer neither. (using CHROME)
works with MS EDGE
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hmmmmmmm strange, I have not heard anything from LJ, hope they are looking into it….
Perhaps I should try and write Cricket directly?
 

· Banned
Joined
·
18,919 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
yeah thats strange havn't heard anyone mention that problem,sounds like it's on his end maybe?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,736 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
It is browser sensitive as I have experienced.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,332 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.


Just a wee higher than the systainer, to avoid catching the edge.
It will be mounted under the table on to the systainer.


Here you can see the systainer, has a natural lip, that will be used for support.


Next up is the table top.
Festool MFT3 holes are marked up, with the 96 mm spacing, so I can use my clamps, dogs and other stuff with it.


My DIY router plate are marked up.
Here four blogs about it:
Here you can see how the base plate was made, as I made another router table, for my allotment: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131023


Like this I could get most holes.


After marking the holes carefully with a brat awl, they are drilled, with a 20mm Forstner bit.


Almost through, the top is turned and drilled from the back, this is to avoid tear out.


Tataaaaaa!
A small worktabe, for the systainer.
Starting to look like the idea I had.


Time to work on the router part.


A hole…


Just for the jigsaw, to saw out the cenrtre.
Leaving the shoulder, for the router plate to rest on.


Then the router can come to use, routing out for the plates thickness.


That's kind of it…


But I guess I did not tighten the bit or the base, since, a part of the shoulder had been routed out, half a mm too deep…
Bad luck MaFe!


Well easy fixed, with masking tape in layers, until the plate and table are all flush.


Plate mounted with screws and now drilling hole for a starter pin on three sides.
(What is a starter pin:
).


Starter pin ready for safe routing.


All edges are run over, with a 45° router bit with ball bearing.
Like this it becomes smooth, sexy and stronger.


Sexy!


Uhhhh getting even closer to the idea.
Here with the router mounted on to the plate.


I have ordered a spare China base for the router, that I will attach and leave on, for quick and easy use, so I don't get tempted to be lazy.


By now it functions as a small router table, that can be mounted on any tabe, here on my MFT3 from festoool, this was part of what I were planning for.


A simple fence, from plywood.
Using a 3D printed bench dog in one end as picot point and a spare lamp clamp, I had laying in a drawer of nonsense for years..


From under side.


Lamp clamp, it can be any clamp.


Bench dog held in place by a knob bolt.


Kind of annoyed me, to see the clamp, sticking up over the table…


So routing a rabbet for it.


Like this I have a flush surface.


Hmmmm the router slipped in the middle and made a small round spot there…
******************** happens and no one will ever know - if you promise me, you don't tell it…


Now the fence can also be used more easy.
Notice I made a hole, that the dog can slip into, like this it goes deeper into the base and gets a better hold.


Here with standard clamp.


A couple of extra holes in the fence, makes it usable as a bench hook / stop.


In both directions.


Why I liked the lamp clamp.
(This end version can not be used on the systainer).


Finally back to the systainer.
The side spacers / holds position are found.


Marking centre of the spacer.


Spacers get double sided tape.


And are put in place.


Table put on top, to check the hight.


Drilling and sinking holes.


Screws to secure the spacers.


I also prepared holes, so it's possible to secure the top to the systainer, if needed.


Like so.


For storage, the screws are put in from the underside, so they are ready.


Finally here we have it, a systainer router table.
(The black clips are flush with table when fully opened, so no problem there).


In workbench mode.


Used as a saw horse.


It's all up to your imagination.


Here with Makitas small fence.


Sweet.


Can be stored, with router mounted.


A tall fence…
A new idea emerged, once the router table was done, so I made this quick plywood tall fence.


Because with a MFT3 table, you have the option to clamp on the sides and so, the router table could become a horizontal table in a moment.


Just move the fence to set bit distance.


Stops can be mounted with clamps.


Now we have a floating tenon setup, Domino light if you like.
You can buy a box of Dominos (or make them) and you have an extra joinery option.


Or just a tall fence for the table.


The top is flipped and router mounted.


Like this.
You also need to set the depth, no router lift here.


Your hand can get into the box, from the back of the table, to turn the router on and off.


Let's route.
This will be great for on site tasks.


Everything can be stored in the box, plenty of room for my other router bases also.


I'm out of here, see you all soon.

To my friends here:
This summer I have been almost absent from LJ, long story short, I got a depression last winter and spend the summer recovering in my new allotment house, building, gardening, restoring, making lovely food and finding my feet again. Now I feel better than ever, but also realized I have to be better at managing my time. Suffering from chronic pain and PTSD, I have a strong need for time in peace and time alone. This means I will try to come here as often, as I have the energy, but I can not be the one who always leaves my friends a comment, on every project. Hope you all understand and respect this choice.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even better some systainer router tables.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
No pictures Mads.

==Madts.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,332 Posts
horizontal router table (blog)

Systainer router table
and Festool MFT vertical / horizontal router table.
(Extra long title, laugh).

Systainer router table?
A router table, that can be stored in the router systainer (tools box), used with the systainer as a small on site router table, but also used in the workshop, as a small vertical and horizontal router table.
Almost sounds too good to be true, but I actually pulled it off!

The project were made out of need, since I realized, I were using my palm router quite often, in a really stupid way, yes and of course also out of pure joy.


So here we have the systainer.
It's for my Makita cordless palm router, a tool I have come to use a lot and as much as I used to hate routers, I start to use this one more and more.
First step is to measure the inside width.


Then the widest sections deepness.


38,8 x x20,1 cm, I think it's the same for all systainers, but you better check it your self, if you plan on building one, for a different brand…


DANGER!
This is how I often found my self using the palm router, as a micro router table, you can probably imagine, how easy it can tip over and I would have to go looking for my fingers…
(I am aware I am a completely idiot, so you are allowed to nag).


A piece of good quality (scrap) plywood cut to size.
Notice there are a gap behind and in front, this is due to the systainers shape, but it also gives a air flow and makes it possible to attach a vacuum hose, if dust extraction is needed.
The systainer will hold most of the shavings and dust, so it can be easily emptied after use.


I choose a size, that could slice down the rabbet in the systainer, so I can use it as a divider, under transport.


Cutting some strips of plywood, to raise and support the table in the systainer.