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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
 

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Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
Given you have Autocad skills you may want to consider using Sketchup to reverse engineer the photo. The photo match process in Sketchup is quite effective. You can see a clear demonstration of the process in this video:

photomatch-a-chair
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
You know, I've had a lot of trouble learning SketchUp for some reason. You guys here on LJ's have put me to shame. I'm on the verge of ordering a SketchUp for Dummies book because I've been blown away by the Craftsman furniture I've found in SketchUp galleries. When you add in the fact that you can change the look of a SketchUp drawing to look like an anitique plan (ala DaveR), I'm sold.
 

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Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
These sites have lots of video on Sketchup.

sketchucation

go-2-school.

YouTube channel

If you go to over to Fine Woodworking to Design. Click. Build. you can look through all the info DaveR and Tim have posted. Be sure to check out the Archive as well.

You can see some of the Sketchup for dummies online before you buy.

Sketchup has a different conceptual framework than Autocad and therefore can be tricky to transition to if you don't do a little primer work. Also, don't let your Autocad keyboard habits frustrate you (particularly the 'space bar' = enter). Sketchup is very useful, however, it doesn't replace Autocad it adds to it.
 

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Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
looks like a plan
 

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Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
Skully,

I was having the same EXACT problem with Sketchup. 2 Suggestions. If you have a laptop, plug in another monitor (I have several around that came from old desktops) and use both screens. Put the tutorial on one screen and your drawing on the other. This alone will usually do the job. But, if this fails, try and attend the Woodworking in America conference on design next year. Bob Lang's class along with the 10 hour a day workshop alone made the trip to Chicago worth it for me. Lang teaches the class in practical terms, and he's a woodworker so he knows what your gonna ask before you ask it.
 
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Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
Going to be a great project!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
I text messaged myself these dimensions at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco. Good thing I brought a tape measure.

Stickley #818 - 39 H x 48 W x 20 D

This matches the Craftsman Home dims. I can run down to Berkeley and check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Selecting the Plans

At first, I was enamored with #802, as done so well by Dale



I looked it up in Robert Lang's book "Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture". I found an article on building it in Woodworking Magazine, Summer 2009 edition. I felt like I had done my homework and thought I might slip this in between the dining table and the chairs. We already have decent chairs.

I didn't really realize it until I saw Stickley Sideboard #818 at the Arts & Crafts Fair in San Francisco this morning that I thought the #802 was a bit anemic for our future dining room set and the #800 was a bit much for anything less than a formal dining room. I came across an antique #818



I showed it to my girlfriend and asked permission of the vendor to take a picture, which she graciously allowed, thanking me for asking. I then found #818 in a Stickley catalog and jotted down the dimensions. I believe the isometric view and the overall size will allow me to reverse engineer the plans for this ala Robert Lang. I may even draw them up in AutoCAD and post them here.

If I keep up this rate, I'm going to have to get a branding iron…
Thanks Dave, you're unbelievably generous. I may take some time at the beginning of the year to teach myself SketchUp. I may take you up on your offer after I do the groundwork. I just taught myself Flash for a job, so my brain is a little swollen right now. This site is especially good at illustrating how powerful a tool SketchUp is for woodworkers. When you factor in how many LJ's are doing it and I'm a techie, it makes it all the more imperative. When I'm ready, I'll shoot you a PM.

Thanks again,

Chris
 
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